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Standard

Twin Engine Helicopter Power Requirements

1997-06-01
CURRENT
AIR1850A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) defines the power spectrum during normal and emergency operations of a twin engine helicopter and thereby postulates suitable power plant rating structures. This document does not address the power requirements for single engine helicopters or those with more than two engines.
Standard

The Effect of Installation Power Losses on the Overall Performance of a Helicopter

2005-06-07
CURRENT
AIR5642
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to illustrate the effect of installation power losses on the performance of a helicopter. Installation power losses result from a variety of sources, some associated directly with the basic engine installation, and some coming from the installation of specific items of aircraft mission specific equipment. Close attention must be paid to the accurate measurement of these losses so that the correct aircraft performance is calculated. Installation power losses inevitably result in a reduction in the overall performance of the aircraft. In some cases, careful attention to detail will allow specific elements of the overall loss to be reduced with immediate benefit for the mission performance of the aircraft. When considering items of equipment that affect the engine, it is important to understand the effect these will have on overall aircraft performance to ensure that mission capability is not unduly compromised.
Standard

Performance of Low Pressure Ratio Ejectors for Engine Nacelle Cooling

1999-03-01
CURRENT
AIR1191A
A general method for the preliminary design of a single, straight-sided, low subsonic ejector is presented. The method is based on the information presented in References 1, 2, 3, and 4, and utilizes analytical and empirical data for the sizing of the ejector mixing duct diameter and flow length. The low subsonic restriction applies because compressibility effects were not included in the development of the basic design equations. The equations are restricted to applications where Mach numbers within the ejector primary or secondary flow paths are equal to or less than 0.3.
Standard

Oil Systems for Helicopter Powerplants

1998-11-01
CURRENT
AIR4281
Turbine engines installed in helicopters require a highly sophisticated oil system to fulfill two tasks: a Cooling/oil supply b Lubrication While lubrication is an engine internal procedure, cooling and oil supply require more or less design activity on the aircraft side of the engine/airframe interface for proper engine function, depending on the engine type. The necessity for engine cooling and oil supply provisions on the airframe can lead to interface problems because the helicopter manufacturer can influence engine related functions due to the design of corresponding oil system components. This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) deals with integration of engine oil systems with the airframe and gives information for both helicopter and engine manufacturers for a better understanding of interface requirements.
Standard

Helicopter FUEL Economy Evaluation

1978-02-01
CURRENT
AS1516
The purpose of this standard is to provide a method of evaluating helicopter fuel economy which accounts for the significant technical variables in helicopter and powerplant design.
Standard

HELICOPTER TURBINE ENGINE WASH

1995-05-01
CURRENT
AIR4416
Engines subject to dust, industrial pollution, saltwater contamination or other chemically laden atmosphere (including pesticides and herbicides) lose performance due to deposits of contaminants on surfaces in the aidgas flow path. Engine wash and engine rinse procedures are utilized to restore turbine engine performance. These procedures are generated by the engine manufacturer and are included in the Engine Maintenance/Service Manuals. For most turbine engines these procedures are similar in concept and practice; however, application details, choice of solvents and many other service features can vary from engine manufacturer to engine manufacturer and may even vary within the range of engine models produced by any manufacturer.
Standard

Cockpit Information Required for Helicopter Turbine Engine Operation and Maintenance

1997-06-01
CURRENT
AIR1963A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) identifies Propulsion Engineer’s recommendations for the instrumentation that is required for the safe operation and maintenance of turbine engines as installed in helicopters. It should be used as a guide for cockpit layout, as well as a reference for maintenance considerations throughout the propulsion area. Propulsion instruments should receive attention early in the design phase of the helicopter. Maintenance and diagnostics recorders are not considered within the scope of this document. (See ARP1587, “Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Monitoring System Guide”.)
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