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Takeoff Performance Monitor (TOPM) System, Airplane, Minimum Performance Standard For

2007-09-02
WIP
AS8044A
This Aerospace Standard (AS), establishes minimum performance standards for those sensors, computers, transponders, and airplane flight deck controls/displays which together comprise a Takeoff Performance Monitor (TOPM) System. This standard also defines functional capabilities, design requirements, and test procedures. A TOPM system is intended to monitor the progress of the takeoff and to provide advisory information which the crew may use in conjunction with other available cues to decide to continue or abort the takeoff. See Appendix A for supplementary information relating to NTSB, CAA, and ad hoc committee concerns and background information.
Standard

TAKEOFF PERFORMANCE MONITOR (TOPM) SYSTEM, AIRPLANE, MINIMUM PERFORMANCE STANDARD FOR

1987-08-01
CURRENT
AS8044
This Aerospace Standard (AS), establishes minimum performance standards for those sensors, computers, transponders, and airplane flight deck controls/displays which together comprise a Takeoff Performance Monitor (TOPM) System. This standard also defines functional capabilities, design requirements, and test procedures. A TOPM system is intended to monitor the progress of the takeoff and to provide advisory information which the crew may use in conjunction with other available cues to decide to continue or abort the takeoff. See Appendix A for supplementary information relating to NTSB, CAA, and ad hoc committee concerns and background information.
Standard

Stowage of Flight Crew’s Survival Emergency and Miscellaneous Equipment

1988-07-01
HISTORICAL
ARP4101/6
This document recommends general specifications for the location, accessibility and restraint for those items of survival, emergency, and miscellaneous equipment which are intended to be used by the flight crew, and which are stowed on or near the flight deck.
Standard

Stowage of Flight Crew's Survival Emergency and Miscellaneous Equipment

2013-07-18
CURRENT
ARP4101/6A
This document recommends general specifications for the location, accessibility and restraint for those items of survival, emergency, and miscellaneous equipment which are intended to be used by the flight crew, and which are stowed on or near the flight deck.
Standard

Seats and Restraint Systems for the Flight Deck

1990-03-01
CURRENT
ARP4101/1
This document establishes the minimum requirements for seats and restraint systems for the flight deck. Due to limitations that it would place upon basic aircraft design, it is not considered practical for these requirements to apply fully to the observer seat. However, it is emphasized that every effort should be made to provide the observer seat position with an equivalent level of comfort and safety. This document is also intended to make recommendations for flight crew restraint systems. A properly designed crew restraint system will minimize injury or debilitation during a survivable crash and enable post crash assistance to occupants and escape from the aircraft. Crew member safety is the primary objective, with appropriate provisions for crew comfort taken into consideration. The criteria established herein are designed to standardize restraint systems without hindering the development of new, improved systems.
Standard

Seats and Restraint Systems for the Flight Deck

2013-05-22
WIP
ARP4101/1A
This document establishes the minimum requirements for seats and restraint systems for the flight deck. Due to limitations that it would place upon basic aircraft design, it is not considered practical for these requirements to apply fully to the observer seat. However, it is emphasized that every effort should be made to provide the observer seat position with an equivalent level of comfort and safety. This document is also intended to make recommendations for flight crew restraint systems. A properly designed crew restraint system will mminimize injury or debilitation during a survivable crash and enable post crash assistance to occupants and escape from the aircraft. Crew member safety is the primary objective, with appropriate provisions for crew comfort taken into consideration. The criteria established herein are designed to standardize restraint systems without hindering the development of new, improved systems.
Standard

Pilot Visibility From The Flight Deck

1989-02-01
CURRENT
ARP4101/2
This document recommends criteria to assure adequate visibility from the flight deck. The flight deck windshield must provide sufficient external vision to permit the pilot to perform any maneuvers within the operating limits of the aircraft safely and at the same time afford an unobstructed view of the flight instruments and other critical components and displays from the same eye position.
Standard

On Board Weight and Balance System

1988-07-01
CURRENT
ARP4102/1
This document recommends criteria for the flight deck display of an On Board Weight and Balance System. The system may have the capability of a primary operational device or be a secondary advisory source of information of weight and center of gravity position. The recommendations apply to transport aircraft and describe the operational and functional requirements for the display of an On Board Weight and Balance System.
Standard

NOMENCLATURE AND ABBREVIATIONS FOR USE ON THE FLIGHT DECK

1985-12-15
CURRENT
AS425C
This Standard is intended to establish preferred abbreviations for use on panels, controls, instruments, displays, placards and markings. The recommendations apply to terms used in the flight deck of transport aircraft. The abbreviations, symbols and codes do not supersede those used in airworthiness regulations or aeronautical charts and documents. Where conflict is possible the operational context must be such as to resolve any ambiguity. If doubt exists, an alternative abbreviation or less truncated abbreviation should be used.
Standard

Mitigation for Loss-of-Control Accidents in Transport Airplanes

2010-08-12
WIP
ARP6149
Prevention of catastrophic upset mishaps cannot depend solely on recovery training. The proposed document should complement the training initiatives already in place. As a committee dealing with transport human factors and handling qualities, the output must consider both issues. At the same time, we cannot ignore initial and recurrent training issues and the widespread use of ground-based simulators. The plan would follow the approach taken in the 2003 S-7 white paper but would extend the scope to all forms of LOC, not just repeated rudder reversals. As with the white pa-per, the new document would have sections on transport handling qualities, flight control modes, aircraft displays, simulator requirements, and approval for IFR test evaluations as well as covering training issues. This new document would complement, not replace documents such as the Airplane Upset Recovery Training Aid.
Standard

INTEGRATION PROCEDURES FOR THE INTRODUCTION OF NEW SYSTEMS TO THE COCKPIT

1995-03-01
CURRENT
ARP4927
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidance to achieve the optimum integration of new aircraft systems which have an impact on the cockpit layout or crew operating procedures. This process may also be used for modification of existing cockpits.
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