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Technical Paper

“Fuel Flow Method2” for Estimating Aircraft Emissions

2006-08-30
2006-01-1987
In recent years there has been increasing interest in quantifying the emissions from aircraft in order to generate inventories of emissions for climate models, technology and scenario studies, and inventories of emissions for airline fleets typically presented in environmental reports. The preferred method for calculating aircraft engine emissions of NOx, HC, and CO is the proprietary “P3T3” method. This method relies on proprietary airplane and engine performance models along with proprietary engine emissions characterizations. In response and in order to provide a transparent method for calculating aircraft engine emissions non proprietary fuel flow based methods 1,2,3 have been developed. This paper presents derivation, updates, and clarifications of the fuel flow method methodology known as “Fuel Flow Method 2”.
Technical Paper

“Condensation – Why it Needs to be Addressed in Every Aircraft”

2003-09-08
2003-01-3000
A wide body aircraft carries almost a half–ton of water and ice between the cabin and skin of the aircraft. The water can get on wires and connectors, which can cause electrical problems, cause corrosion and rust, and, eventually, “rain in the plane”. The speaker is the CEO of CTT Systems that has developed a system that solves the condensation by using dry air. The speaker will discuss how condensation can be prevented and how airlines can also save maintenance costs in the process. This topic is relevant for the attendees at the Aerospace Expo, as they are decision makers who need to be aware of this issue. It is also important for the MRO shows as the attendees are on the front lines of dealing with this problem.
Technical Paper

“A Dry Aircraft is a Safer Aircraft – Beating Condensation by Using Dry Air”

2003-09-08
2003-01-3017
The airline industry seems to be providing more leisure features on planes like inflight entertainment, Internet access and Digital TV, but it seems the airline industry has ignored the issue of excess condensation on aircraft, which had plagued carriers since the birth of the airline industry. How safe are passengers when a wide body aircraft carries in excess almost a half ton of water and ice between the cabin and skin of the aircraft? Besides the added weight straining the aircraft, excess condensation soaks wires and connectors which can cause electrical shorts. There have been instances of emergency doors frozen shut, locked by ice stemming from excess water dripping inside the plane. Extra water also causes “rain-in-the-plane”, an issue that has gained national attention and causes passenger discomfort. It's time for the industry to address what has become a serious issue.
Technical Paper

Working Fluid De-freezing in Radiator on Base of LHP

2007-07-09
2007-01-3199
Selection of working fluid is one of the main criterions for designing of heat pipes thermal control systems (TCS) for space application. In this paper we will describe how we solved the task of development of the TCS with working fluid of high thermal physical properties. In 2004-2006 we developed the Engineering model of Deployable Radiator based on Loop Heat Pipe by CAST purchase order. It was developed for qualification tests. Ammonia application as LHP working fluid is stipulated by its high thermal physical properties. However Ammonia freezing temperature is of minus 77ºC. Such fact impedes Ammonia application when operation temperatures of LHP Radiator are lower than this value, for example, It takes several tens of hours to orbit a spacecraft and prepare it for work (at that moment the spacecraft is out of power supply) and the working fluid can be frozen in a condenser-radiator when the spacecraft being in the shadow over a long period of time.
Technical Paper

Workforce Enterprise Modeling

2007-09-17
2007-01-3834
Currently, many factors influence the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) workforce. These factors include the drive for return to flight, a Shuttle Program end date of 2010, and the Vision for Space Exploration which calls for the development of a new launch vehicle. Additionally, external factors exist as well, such as the area's cost of living, the availability of skilled resources, and the unemployment rate affect the overall workforce climate. To manage the human capital in a manner consistent with safety and mission success, and to strategically position NASA KSC to execute its future mission, it is necessary to understand how all of these different influencing factors work together to produce an overall workforce climate. We have been using System Dynamics models in order to capture some of these factors. These system dynamics models are also the starting point of agent-based models.
Standard

Wire, Electric, Polyvinyl Chloride Insulated, Copper or Copper Alloy

1998-03-01
HISTORICAL
AS50861
This specification covers polyvinyl chloride insulated single conductor electric wires made with tin-coated copper conductors or silver-coated copper alloy conductors as specified in the applicable military specification sheet. The polyvinyl chloride insulation of these wires may be used alone or in combination with other insulating or protective materials.
Standard

Wire and Cable Marking Process, UV Laser

2019-10-21
CURRENT
AS5649A
This standard is applicable to the marking of aerospace vehicle electrical wires and cables using ultraviolet (UV) lasers. This standard specifies the process requirements for the implementation of UV laser marking of aerospace electrical wire and cable and fiber optic cable to achieve an acceptable quality mark using equipment designed for UV laser marking of identification codes on aerospace wire and cable. Wiring specified as UV laser markable subject to AS4373 and which has been marked in accordance with this standard will conform to the requirements of AS50881.
Standard

Wire and Cable Marking Process, UV Laser

2007-05-31
HISTORICAL
AS5649
This standard is applicable to the marking of aerospace vehicle electrical wires and cables using ultraviolet (UV) lasers. This standard specifies the process requirements for the implementation of UV laser marking of aerospace electrical wire and cable and fiber optic cable to achieve an acceptable quality mark using equipment designed for UV laser marking of identification codes on aerospace wire and cable. Wiring specified as UV laser markable subject to AS4373 Test Methods for Insulated Electric Wire and which has been marked in accordance with this standard will conform to the requirements of AS50881.
Standard

Wipes, Cotton, Loosely Woven

1992-10-01
CURRENT
AMS3803A
This specification covers a loosely-woven cotton in the form of wipes supplied in rolls or cut sheets.
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