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Technical Paper

The Challenges of Developing an Energy, Emissions, and Fuel Economy Test Procedure for Heavy-Duty Hybrid Electric Transit Vehicles

1995-11-01
952610
Over twenty prototype hybrid buses and other commercial vehicles are currently being completed and deployed. These vehicles are primarily “series” hybrid vehicles which use electric motors for primary traction while internal combustion engines, or high-speed turbine engines connected to generators, supply some portion of the electric propulsion and battery recharge energy. Hybrid-electric vehicles have an electric energy storage system on board that influences the operation of the heat engine. The storage system design and level affect the vehicle emissions, electricity consumption, and fuel economy. Existing heavy-duty emissions test procedures require that the engine be tested over a transient cycle before it can be used in vehicles (over 26,000 lbs GVW). This paper describes current test procedures for assessing engine and vehicle emissions, and proposes techniques for evaluating engines used with hybrid-electric vehicle propulsion systems.
Technical Paper

Solid Particle Number and Ash Emissions from Heavy-Duty Natural Gas and Diesel w/SCRF Engines

2018-04-03
2018-01-0362
Solid and metallic ash particle number (PN) and particulate matter (PM) mass emission measurements were performed on a heavy-duty (HD) on-highway diesel engine and a compressed natural gas (CNG) engine. Measurements were conducted under transient engine operation that included the FTP, WHTC and RMC. Both engines were calibrated to meet CARB ultra low NOX emission target of 0.02 g/hp-hr, a 90% reduction from current emissions limit. The HD diesel engine final exhaust configuration included a number of aftertreatement sub-systems in addition to a selective catalytic reduction filter (SCRF). The stoichiometric CNG engine final configuration included a closed coupled Three Way Catalyst (ccTWC) and an under floor TWC (ufTWC). The aftertreatment systems for both engines were aged for a full useful life (FUL) of 435,000 miles, prior to emissions testing. PM mass emissions from both engines were comparable and well below the US EPA emissions standard.
Technical Paper

Roadmap for Hybridization of Military Tactical Vehicles: How Can We Get There?

2002-11-18
2002-01-3048
The U.S. Army's National Automotive Center has contracted with Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute (IITRI), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and Advanced Propulsion, LLC, to evaluate the effects on fuel consumption and logistics that would result from hybridizing the powertrains of the Army's tactical wheeled vehicle fleet. This paper will outline the approach taken to perform that evaluation and present a synopsis of results achieved to date.
Technical Paper

Quantitative Estimate of the Relation Between Rolling Resistance on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Tractor Trailers Using Both New and Retreaded Tires

2014-09-30
2014-01-2425
Road tests of class 8 tractor trailers were conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on a new and retreaded tires of varying rolling resistance in order to provide estimates of the quantitative relation between rolling resistance and fuel consumption. Reductions in fuel consumption were measured using the SAE J1231 (reaffirmation of 1986) test method. Vehicle rolling resistance was calculated as a load-weighted average of the rolling resistance (as measured by ISO28580) of the tires in each axle position. Both new and retreaded tires were tested in different combinations to obtain a range of vehicle coefficient of rolling resistance from a baseline of 7.7 kg/ton to 5.3 kg/ton. Reductions in fuel consumption displayed a strong linear relationship with coefficient of rolling resistance, with a maximum reduction of fuel consumption of 10 percent relative to the baseline.
Technical Paper

Parasitic Loss Reduction for 21st Century Trucks

2000-12-04
2000-01-3423
To reach its objective of reducing vehicle fuel consumption by 50 percent, the development of the 21st Century Truck (21T) will address all the aspects of truck design contributing to the achievement of that goal. [1] This paper will address one of these aspects, specifically vehicle parasitic loss reduction with special emphasis on drive train losses, concentrating on the potential benefits of replacing mechanical coolant (water) and oil pumps with electrically powered pumps.
Technical Paper

Model-Based Approach to Estimate Fuel Savings from Series Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicle: Model Development and Validation

2011-09-13
2011-01-2274
A simulation framework with a validated system model capable of estimating fuel consumption is a valuable tool in analysis and design of the hybrid vehicles. In particular, the framework can be used for (1) benchmarking the fuel economy achievable from alternate hybrid powertrain technologies, (2) investigating sensitivity of fuel savings with respect to design parameters (for example, component sizing), and (3) evaluating the performance of various supervisory control algorithms for energy management. This paper describes such a simulation framework that can be used to predict fuel economy of series hydraulic hybrid vehicle for any specified driver demand schedule (drive cycle), developed in MATLAB/Simulink. The key components of the series hydraulic hybrid vehicle are modeled using a combination of first principles and empirical data. A simplified driver model is included to follow the specified drive cycle.
Technical Paper

Methods of Improving Combustion Efficiency in a High-Efficiency, Lean Burn Dual-Fuel Heavy-Duty Engine

2019-01-15
2019-01-0032
Combustion losses are one of the largest areas on inefficiency in natural gas/diesel dual-fuel engines, especially when compared to the traditional diesel engines on which they are based. These losses can vary from 1-2% at high load, to more than 6% of the total fuel energy at part load conditions. For diesel/natural gas dual-fuel engines, the three main sources of combustion losses are: bulk losses (increasing air-fuel ratio, AFR, to the premixed fuel’s lean flammability limit), crevice losses (premixed fuel trapped near valve pockets and top ring lands unable to oxidize), and blow-through losses (fumigated fuel/air intake charge passes through the cylinder and out the exhaust valve during valve overlap). In order to improve overall engine efficiency and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, these losses must be minimized.
Journal Article

Medium-Duty Vehicle Fuel Saving Technology Analysis to Support Phase 2 Regulations

2015-09-29
2015-01-2769
This paper presents the results of engine and vehicle simulation modeling for a wide variety of individual technologies and technology packages applied to two medium-duty vocational vehicles. Simulation modeling was first conducted on one diesel and two gasoline medium-duty engines. Engine technologies were then applied to the baseline engines. The resulting fuel consumption maps were run over a range of vehicle duty cycles and payloads in the vehicle simulation model. Results were reported for both individual engine technologies and combinations or packages of technologies. Two vehicles, a Kenworth T270 box delivery truck and a Ford F-650 tow truck were evaluated. Once the baseline vehicle models were developed, vehicle technologies were added. As with the medium-duty engines, vehicle simulation results were reported for both individual technologies and for combinations. Vehicle technologies were evaluated only with the baseline 2019 diesel medium-duty engine.
Technical Paper

Low Cost Bharat Stage 3 and 4 Heavy Duty Diesel Technology

2011-01-19
2011-26-0078
This paper reviews the technologies available for Bharat Stage 3 and 4 Heavy Duty on-highway emissions standards. Benchmarking data from several existing engines is used to explore the trade-offs between engine/vehicle cost and fuel consumption. Other implications of the available technologies, such as durability / reliability requirements, are also addressed. The paper provides recommendations for low cost approaches to meeting Bharat Stage 3 and 4 standards with good fuel consumption and reliability/ durability characteristics. A brief look ahead to future Bharat Stage 5 requirements is also provided.
Technical Paper

Locomotive Emissions Measurements for Various Blends of Biodiesel Fuel

2013-09-08
2013-24-0106
The objective of this project was to assess the effects of various blends of biodiesel on locomotive engine exhaust emissions. Systematic, credible, and carefully designed and executed locomotive fuel effect studies produce statistically significant conclusions are very scarce, and only cover a very limited number of locomotive models. Most locomotive biodiesel work has been limited to cursory demonstration programs. Of primary concern to railroads and regulators is understanding any exhaust emission associated with biodiesel use, especially NOX emissions. In this study, emissions tests were conducted on two locomotive models, a Tier 2 EMD SD70ACe and a Tier 1+ GE Dash9-44CW with two baseline fuels, conventional EPA ASTM No. 2-D S15 (commonly referred to as ultra-low sulfur diesel - ULSD) certification diesel fuel, and commercially available California Air Resource Board (CARB) ULSD fuel.
Technical Paper

Hydraulic System Configurations for Improved Efficiency

2002-03-19
2002-01-1433
The design and selection of a hydraulic system for a particular machine is based upon a variety of factors which include: functionality, performance, safety, cost, reliability, duty cycle, component availability, and efficiency. With higher fuel costs and requirements to reduce engine exhaust emissions, new hydraulic system configurations should be considered. Traditional hydraulic systems conssume an excessive amount of energy due to metering losses. A single pump usually supplies flow to multiple functions, with differing flow and pressure requirements resulting in excessive metering losses. The energy of mass and inertial loads is usually dissipated by metering losses. Opportunities exist for reducing metering losses by the use of multiple pumps and by using hydrostatic control of individual functions. Hydrostatic control also allows for energy recovery when used in conjunction with an energy storage system.
Journal Article

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Fuel Saving Technology Analysis to Support Phase 2 Regulations

2015-09-29
2015-01-2775
This paper presents the fuel consumption results of engine and vehicle simulation modeling for a wide variety of individual technologies and technology packages applied to a long haul heavy duty vehicle. Based on the simulation modeling, up to 11% in fuel savings is possible using commercially available and emerging technologies applied to a 15L DD15 engine alone. The predicted fuel savings are up to 17% in a Kenworth T700 tractor-trailer unit equipped with a range of vehicle technologies, but using the baseline DD15 diesel engine. A combination of the most aggressive engine and vehicle technologies can provide savings of up to 29%, averaged over a range of drive cycles. Over 30% fuel savings were found with the most aggressive combination on a simulated long haul duty cycle. Note that not all of these technologies may prove to be cost-effective. The fuel savings benefits for individual technologies vary widely depending on the drive cycles and payload.
Technical Paper

Fuel Economy Improvements and NOx Reduction by Reduction of Parasitic Losses: Effect of Engine Design

2006-10-31
2006-01-3474
Reducing aerodynamic drag and tire rolling resistance in trucks using cooled EGR engines meeting EPA 2004 emissions standards has been observed to result in increases in fuel economy and decreases in NOx emissions. We report here on tests conducted using vehicles equipped a non-EGR engine meeting EPA 2004 emission standards and an electronically-controlled engine meeting EPA 1998 emissions standards. The effects of trailer fairings and single-wide tires on fuel economy and NOx emissions were tested using SAE test procedure J1321. NOx emissions were measured using a portable emissions monitoring system (PEMS). Fuel consumption was estimated by a carbon balance on PEMS output and by the gravimetric method specified by test procedure J1321. Fuel consumption decreased and fuel economy increased by a maximum of about 10 percent, and NOx emissions decreased by a maximum of 20 percent relative to baseline.
Technical Paper

Fuel Consumption of Crawler Tractors

1982-02-01
821081
In this paper, a mathematical model is used to determine the fuel-consuming characteristics of a typical crawler tractor with bulldozer under various opera ting regimes. The results are used to suggest various methods to reduce tractor fuel consumption.
Technical Paper

Emissions from Trucks by Chassis Version of 1983 Transient Procedure

1980-10-01
801371
Regulated gaseous, particulate and several unregulated emissions are reported from four heavy-duty diesel engines operated on the chassis version of the 1983 transient procedure. Emissions were obtained from Caterpillar 3208, Mack ENDT 676, Cummins Formula 290 and Detroit Diesel 8V-71 engines with several diesel fuels. A large dilution tunnel (57′ × 46″ ID) was fabricated to allow total exhaust dilution, rather than the double dilution employed in the stationary engine version of the transient procedure. A modal particulate sampler was developed to obtain particulate data from the individual segments of the 1983 transient procedure. The exhaust gas was analyzed for benzo(a)pyrene, metals, N2O, NO2, individual hydrocarbons and HCN. Sequential extractions were performed and measured versus calculated fuel consumptions were obtained.
Technical Paper

Electromagnetic Compatibility in the Off-Highway Vehicle Part III: Electromagnetic Emissions (EME)

1992-09-01
921654
Electromagnetic emissions (EME) from vehicles and their effect on broadcast radio and television were studied as early as 1944. Their original effect was significantly reduced by the early 1960s. Today, ignition noise (broadband) and vehicular micro-processor-controlled system noise (narrowband) are interfering with Land Mobile (two-way) communication services and other devices such as computers. Two SAE test methods, J551 and J1816, are used to measure this EME. Under development are methods to measure conducted EME on vehicle signal wiring and power input leads. This paper discusses EME measurement methods, provides insight into the sources of EME problems, and gives information on the test instrumentation used to make these measurements. This paper is the third in a series of papers on electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) in the off-highway vehicle. The first paper was an overview of a complete EMC program with discussion of several important segments.
Technical Paper

Dilute Measurement of Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC) from a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

2017-10-08
2017-01-2393
Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) are a group of compounds in engine exhaust that either form during combustion or are part of the fuel and lubricating oil. Since these compounds occur at very low concentrations in diesel engine exhaust, the methods for sampling, handling, and analyzing these compounds are critical to obtaining good results. An improved dilute exhaust sampling method was used for sampling and analyzing SVOC in engine exhaust, and this method was performed during transient engine operation. A total of 22 different SVOC were measured using a 2012 medium-duty diesel engine. This engine was equipped with a stock diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), a diesel particulate filter (DPF), and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst in series. Exhaust concentrations for SVOC were compared both with and without exhaust aftertreatment. Concentrations for the engine-out SVOC were significantly higher than with the aftertreatment present.
Book

Diesel Emissions and Their Control

2006-12-01
This book will assist readers in meeting today's tough challenges of improving diesel engine emissions, diesel efficiency, and public perception of the diesel engine. It can be used as an introductory text, while at the same time providing practical information that will be useful for experienced readers. This comprehensive book is well illustrated with more than 560 figures and 80 tables. Each main section is broken down into chapters that offer more specific and extensive information on current issues, as well as answers to technical questions.
Journal Article

Cycle-Average Heavy-Duty Engine Test Procedure for Full Vehicle Certification - Numerical Algorithms for Interpreting Cycle-Average Fuel Maps

2016-09-27
2016-01-8018
In June of 2015, the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve the fuel efficiency of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. The agencies proposed that vehicle manufacturers would certify vehicles to the standards by using the agencies’ Greenhouse Gas Emission Model (GEM). The agencies also proposed a steady-state engine test procedure for generating GEM inputs to represent the vehicle’s engine performance. In the proposal the agencies also requested comment on an alternative engine test procedure, the details of which were published in two separate 2015 SAE Technical Papers [1, 2]. As an alternative to the proposed steady-state engine test procedure, these papers presented a cycle-average test procedure.
Technical Paper

Application of On-Highway Emissions Technology on a Scraper Engine

1992-04-01
920923
An investigation was performed to determine the effects of applying on-highway heavy-duty diesel engine emissions reduction technology to an off-highway version of the engine. Special attention was paid to the typical constraints of fuel consumption, heat rejection, packaging and cost-effectiveness. The primary focus of the effort was NOx, reduction while hopefully not worsening other gaseous and particulate emissions. Hardware changes were limited to “bolt-on” items, thus excluding piston and combustion chamber modifications. In the final configuration, NOx was improved by 28 percent, particulates by 58 percent, CO and HC were also better and the fuel economy penalty was limited to under 4 percent. Observations are made about the effectiveness of various individual and combined strategies, and potential problems are identified.
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