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Journal Article

“Sticky” Lining – the Phenomena, Mechanism and Prevention

2008-04-14
2008-01-0819
An unique bonding mechanism was studied after several instances, where the linings stuck to the brake drums on transit buses, were reported. Evidences suggested that the linings were “glued” to the brake drums surface after wear debris (dust) was turned into “adhesive paste” through complicated thermal and chemical changes. Factors such as the friction materials, environment and service conditions, which could activate and deactivate the lining bonding, were observed and discussed. The prevention measures are proposed.
Technical Paper

“Smart sensing” of Oil Degradation and Oil Level Measurements in Gasoline Engines

2000-03-06
2000-01-1366
Proper lubrication of moving parts is a critical factor in internal combustion engine performance and longevity. Determination of ideal lubricant change intervals is a prerequisite to ensuring maximum engine efficiency and useful life. When oil change intervals are pushed too far, increased engine wear and even engine damage can result. On the other hand, premature oil changes are inconvenient, add to vehicle maintenance cost, and result in wasted natural resources. In order to determine the appropriate oil change interval, we have developed an oil condition sensor that measures the electrical properties of engine oil, and correlates these electrical properties to the physical and chemical properties of oil. This paper provides a brief background discussion of the oil degradation process, followed by a description of the sensor operational principles and the correlation of the sensor output with physical and chemical engine oil properties.
Technical Paper

“DELRIN” ACETAL RESIN —a new engineering material

1959-01-01
590033
“DELRIN” is a new thermoplastic which offers high strength, excellent thermal stability, good fatigue life, low creep, and excellent solvent resistance. This paper describes the physical and chemical properties of the material, and the range of possible uses. The material is easily fabricated into complex shapes by standard injection-molding techniques. Also, it can be easily joined to itself or to other materials. The authors think that the material offers advantages over metals in its good fric-tional properties, abrasion resistance, and corrosion resistance.
Technical Paper

pCBT: A New Material for High Performance Composites in Automotive Applications1

2004-10-26
2004-01-2698
Cyclic oligomers of butylene terephthalate (CBT™)† represent a new chemical route to semi-crystalline thermoplastic polybutylene terephthalate (PBT). The oligomers of interest melt completely at about 150°C to produce a low viscosity fluid that is ideal for wetting and dispersing fibrous fillers and reinforcements thereby enabling the development of composites that were previously not possible when working with high viscosity commercial PBT. Introduction of catalyst to undiluted molten cyclic oligomer leads to rapid ring opening polymerization and the formation of high molecular weight thermoplastic PBT without the generation of volatile organic compounds. The polymer resulting from this polymerization will be hereby referred to as pCBT. Treatment of cyclic oligomers in this fashion results in pCBT thermoplastic resin with a high melting point (230°C) and physical performance similar to that of other commercially available PBT resins.
Technical Paper

Zinc-Magnesium-Aluminium (ZM)-HDG-Coated Steel Sheet for Structural Parts to Outer Panels

2017-03-28
2017-01-0507
Zinc-coatings with a substantial Magnesium content have been in use for over 30 years by now. Unlike the well-established Zn-Al-Mg coatings originating from Japan which have significant higher alloying contents applied mainly for building applications, this Zinc Magnesium Aluminum coating (ZM) is also specifically designed to meet the requirements of car manufacturers. The ZM coating introduced by voestalpine, corrender, is in the upper range of ZM-alloying compositions, which was set by VDA (German Association of the Automotive Industry) and SAE to be within 1.0 to 2.0 wt. % Mg and 1.0 to 3.0 wt. % Al. The properties of these “European” Zinc-Magnesium coatings are well comparable within this range. Compared to GI and GA ZM coatings exhibit significant advantages in the press shops with its excellent formability and reduced galling and powdering respectively which is a significant advantage for the forming of outer panels.
Standard

Zinc Die Casting Alloys

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J469_201712
Because of the drastic chilling involved in die casting and the fact that the solid solubilities of both aluminum and copper in zinc change with temperature, these alloys are subject to some aging changes, one of which is a dimensional change. Both of the alloys undergo a slight shrinkage after casting, which at room temperature is about two-thirds complete in five weeks. It is possible to accelerate this shrinkage by a stabilizing anneal, after which no further changes occur. The recommended stabilizing anneal is 3 to 6 h at 100 °C (212 °F), or 5 to 10 h at 85 °C (185 °F), or 10 to 20 h at 70 °C (158 °F). The time in each case is measured from the time at which the castings reach the annealing temperature. The parts may be air cooled after annealing. Such a treatment will cause a shrinkage (0.0004 in per in) of about two-thirds of the total, and the remaining shrinkage will occur at room temperature during the subsequent few weeks.
Standard

ZINC DIE CASTING ALLOYS

1989-01-01
HISTORICAL
J469_198901
Because of the drastic chilling involved in die casting and the fact that the solid solubilities of both aluminum and copper in zinc change with temperature, these alloys are subject to some aging changes, one of which is a dimensional change. Both of the alloys undergo a slight shrinkage after casting, which at room temperature is about two-thirds complete in five weeks. It is possible to accelerate this shrinkage by a stabilizing anneal, after which no further changes occur. The recommended stabilizing anneal is 3 to 6 h at 100 °C (212 °F), or 5 to 10 h at 85 °C (185 °F), or 10 to 20 h at 70 °C (158 °F). The time in each case is measured from the time at which the castings reach the annealing temperature. The parts may be air cooled after annealing. Such a treatment will cause a shrinkage (0.0004 in per in) of about two-thirds of the total, and the remaining shrinkage will occur at room temperature during the subsequent few weeks.
Technical Paper

Yellowing in Automotive Clearcoats

2016-04-05
2016-01-0538
Automotive clearcoats have many purposes, from providing a glossy finish to protecting the underlying paint layers from UV radiation. Yellowing of clearcoats is a natural phenomenon during weathering processes, as well as from extreme baking conditions, due to polymer degradation. However, occasionally yellowing may be caused by unexpected chemical reactions occurring in the clearcoat. These reactions may happen very quickly (within hours or days) or take years to manifest, as other chemicals migrate into the clearcoat. We have investigated one family of these unexpected reactions which occur with certain UV absorbers, as well as how to prevent the reactions from occurring. We found that certain benzotriazole UV absorbers react readily with some common metals, including copper and zinc, provided that the UV absorber is not in its excited state. The conformational change that occurs within the benzotriazole when it absorbs UV radiation effectively inhibits the reaction with metals.
Technical Paper

XB-70A Laboratory for Progress

1966-02-01
660276
The development of the XB-70 research aircraft produced advancements in many fields of technology. This paper covers a few of these advancements in the areas of materials, equipment, and manufacturing. These include honeycomb construction, PH 15-7 alloy steel, vacuum melted H-11 steel, equipment capable of withstanding high temperatures, chemical milling of many different alloys, miniaturized welding equipment, and exothermic brazing techniques.
Technical Paper

X-Rays and Gamma Rays-Their Industrial Application

1937-01-01
370138
THE X-ray spectrum readily adapts itself to problems in chemical analysis and crystal formation. It is effective on very minute particles which otherwise cannot be segregated. A permanent record is made, and the specimens may be used over and over again, as the X-ray is non-destructive. As a means of inspection, X-ray clearly shows the interior of objects such as weldings castings, forgings, cold-worked metals, and so on. Inhomogeneities that are very slight in width and a fraction of one per cent in thickness are seen easily on a radiograph. Defects thus found may be eliminated summarily by checking various steps in production.
Standard

Wrought copper and Copper Alloys

2002-12-20
HISTORICAL
J463_200212
This standard1 describes the chemical, mechanical, and dimensional requirements for a wide range of wrought copper and copper alloys used in the automotive and related industries.
Standard

Wrought Copper and Copper Alloys

2018-01-10
CURRENT
J463_201801
This standard1 describes the chemical, mechanical, and dimensional requirements for a wide range of wrought copper and copper alloys used in the automotive and related industries.
Standard

Wrench, Spanner

2013-05-28
CURRENT
AS6018
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers adjustable and non-adjustable spanner wrenches generally used for aerospace machinery maintenance and for tightening and loosening hose couplings and hydrant caps. Inclusion of dimensional data in this document is not intended to imply all of the products described therein are stock production sizes. Consumers are requested to consult with manufacturers concerning lists of stock production sizes.
Standard

Wire, Steel 0.18 - 0.23C (SAE 1020) Annealed

2019-04-02
CURRENT
AMS5032H
This specification covers a low-carbon steel in the form of wire up to 0.249 inch (6.32 mm), incl supplied as coils of wire or, when specified, as straight lengths.
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