Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 5 of 5
Technical Paper

The Importance of Tire Lag on Simulated Transient Vehicle Response

1991-02-01
910235
This paper discusses the importance of having an adequate model for the dynamic response characteristics of tire lateral force to steering inputs. Computer simulation and comparison with experimental results are used to show the importance of including appropriate tire dynamics in simulation tire models to produce accurate predictions of vehicle dynamics. Improvements made to the tire dynamics model of an existing vehicle stability and control simulation, the Vehicle Dynamics Analysis, Non-Linear (VDANL) simulation, are presented. Specifically, the improvements include changing the simulation's tire dynamics from first-order system tire side force lag dynamics to second-order system tire slip angle dynamics. A second-order system representation is necessary to model underdamped characteristics of tires at high speeds. Lagging slip angle (an input to the tire model) causes all slip angle dependent tire force and moment outputs to be lagged.
Technical Paper

Closed Loop Automobile Maneuvers Using Preview-Predictor Models

1982-02-01
820305
Two computer models of drivers using preview predictor strategies have been successfully implemented in conjunction with a recently developed, all digital vehicle simulation. The driver models determine control inputs to the vehicle simulation by first predicting future vehicle position and velocity and then determining the steering and braking commands necessary to move the vehicle from the predicted to the desired path. Full technical details of the method of implementation for each of the models are given. The results of sample simulations of the driver-vehicle system using each driver model are shown. Problems of each model are discussed.
Technical Paper

Closed Loop Automobile Maneuvers Using Describing Function Models

1982-02-01
820306
Two computer models of drivers using describing function strategies have been successfully implemented in conjunction with a recently developed, all digital vehicle simulation. The driver models determine control inputs to the vehicle simulation by means of feedback loops. Two feedback loops, an outer one on lateral position and an inner one on heading angle are used to determine the steering commands needed to move the vehicle to the desired path. One feedback loop on forward velocity is used to determine braking and acceleration commands. Full technical details of the method of implementation for each of the models are given. The results of sample simulations of the driver-vehicle system are shown and the results discussed.
Technical Paper

An Investigation, Via Simulation, of Vehicle Characteristics that Contribute to Steering Maneuver Induced Rollover

1992-02-01
920585
The goal of this research was to find vehicle characteristics which may contribute to steering maneuver induced rollover accidents. This work involved studying vehicle handling dynamics using the Vehicle Dynamics Analysis, Non-Linear (VDANL) computer simulation. The simulation was used to predict vehicle responses while performing 28 different steering induced maneuvers for each of 51 vehicles. Various measures of vehicle response (metrics), such as response times, percent overshoots, etc., were computed for each vehicle from simulation predictions. These vehicle directional response metrics were analyzed in an attempt to identify vehicle characteristics that might be good predictor/explanatory variables for vehicle rollover propensity. The metrics were correlated, using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) software and logistic regression, with single vehicle accident data from the state of Michigan for the years 1986 through 1988.
Technical Paper

A Methodology for Validating Vehicle Dynamics Simulations

1990-02-01
900128
This paper presents a methodology for validating vehicle stability and control computer simulations. Validation is defined as showing that, within some specified operating range of the vehicle, a simulation's predictions of a vehicle's responses agree with the actual measured vehicle's responses to within some specified level of accuracy. The method uses repeated experimental runs at each test condition to generate sufficient data for statistical analyses. The acquisition and reduction of experimental data, and the processing path for simulation data, are described. The usefulness of time domain validation for steady state and slowly varying transients is discussed. The importance of frequency domain validation for thoroughly validating a simulation is shown. Both qualitative and quantitative methods for the comparison of the simulation predictions with the actual test measurements are developed.
X