Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 9 of 9
Technical Paper

A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Elastomeric Tuned Mass Dampers and Particle Dampers

2003-05-05
2003-01-1419
This paper presents a study and comparison of two methods commonly used to treat unwanted vibration in vehicles. Laboratory work was done to measure and compare the effectiveness of common designs for practical tuned mass dampers (TMDs) and particle dampers under a wide range of conditions. The relative strength and weaknesses of the two approaches are compared in their abilities to treat vibration in a system due to resonant modes and forced response. The effectiveness of each method is investigated as a function of the weight of the treatment, amplitude and temperature effects.
Technical Paper

A Study on Vehicle Elastomer Mount Preloading and Impact Response with Test Validation

2005-04-11
2005-01-1415
A variety of elastomer mounts are being used for vehicles as isolators/dampers between body and frame, on the engine cradle, etc. These vehicle flexible mounts, made of mainly rubber materials and housed in a metallic tube, are indispensable components affecting the quality of the vehicle ride, noise and vibration. In the auto industry, the usual practice when designing vehicle flexible mounts is to minimally reflect impact considerations in the mount design features. However, in most high-speed vehicle crash events where the mounts fail, the crash responses, including occupant injury severity, are known to be very different from the responses of non-failure cases. Even in low-speed vehicle impact cases, excessive deformation of the flexible mounts could cause significant variance in the compliance of the vehicle acceleration level to the air-bag firing and timing threshold requirements.
Technical Paper

Application of a Constrained Layer Damping Treatment to a Cast Aluminum V6 Engine Front Cover

2005-05-16
2005-01-2286
Constrained Layer Damping (CLD) treatments have long provided a means to effectively impart damping to a structure [1, 2 and 3]. Traditionally, CLD treatments are constructed of a very thin polymer layer constrained by a thicker metal layer. Because the adhesion of a thin polymer layer is very sensitive to surface finish, surfaces that a CLD treatment can be effectively applied to have historically been limited to those that are very flat and smooth. New developments in material technology have provided thicker materials that are very effective and less expensive to apply when used as the damping layer in a CLD treatment. This paper documents the effectiveness of such a treatment on a cast aluminum front cover for a V6 engine. Physical construction of the treatment, material properties and design criteria will be discussed. Candidate applications, the assembly process, methods for secondary mechanical fastening will be presented.
Technical Paper

Design Issues in the Use of Elastomers in Automotive Tuned Mass Dampers

2007-05-15
2007-01-2198
The concept of using tuned mass dampers and absorbers to address undesirable vibration responses in vehicles is not new. However, there are several design issues that cause the vibration control performance of real life tuned dampers to be significantly less than that predicted by simple 2-DOF theory. In this paper, the authors will review tuned damper design theory. Practical issues regarding the use of real life elastomers as spring elements are reviewed, including temperature sensitivity, material damping and nonlinearity. Various elastomers are compared for their effectiveness and applicability to the typical automotive environment. Rules of thumb for tuned damper design are discussed including locations for placement of dampers in automotive structures, tuning for temperature variations, determining the needed mass, and measurements and simulations that can greatly improve the success and timing for tuned damper design.
Technical Paper

Laminated Steel Forming Modeling Techniques and Experimental Verifications

2003-03-03
2003-01-0689
Laminated steel sheets sandwiched with a polymer core are increasingly used for automotive applications due to their vibration and sound damping properties. However, it has become a major challenge in finite element modeling of laminated steel structures and forming processes due to the extremely large differences in mechanical properties and in the gauges of the polymer core and the steel skins. In this study, circular cup deep drawing and V-bending experiments using laminated steels were conducted in order to develop a modeling technique for laminate forming processes. The effectiveness of several finite element modeling techniques was investigated using the commercial FEM code LS-Dyna. Furthermore, two production parts were selected to verify the modeling techniques in real world applications.
Technical Paper

Low Temperature Impact Testing of Plastic Materials

2005-04-11
2005-01-1412
This study will analyze existing procedures and commercially available testing equipment for low temperature impact testing of plastic materials. The results of this analysis will be used to identify continuous improvement opportunities and develop recommended practices for low temperature impact testing to support ongoing efforts to meet related durability and performance needs of automotive components.
Technical Paper

Simulation of Hot Stamping Process With Advanced Material Modeling

2004-03-08
2004-01-0168
Advanced material modeling was conducted to describe the thermal-mechanical behavior of Boron Steel during hot stamping, a process in which blanks at 900 °C are formed and quenched between cold dies. Plastic deformation, thermal dilatation and phase transformation were incorporated in the constitutive model and a user-defined subroutine was developed to interface with LS-DYNA. Simulation was conducted on the hot stamping process of a door intrusion beam to gain insight into the physics of the process. Results showed significant influence of the thermal cycle on final product. It was also demonstrated that the program developed can be used as an early feasibility tool to determine baseline processing parameters and to detect potential defects in products without physical prototyping.
Technical Paper

TPE Radiator Components from Post Consumer Tires

2001-11-12
2001-01-3763
Over 250 million tires are scrapped in the United States each year. Tires have been a problematic scrap because they have been designed to resist destruction, and have a tendency to float upwards in landfills. Improper storage has resulted in tire fires1--an even more problematic environmental concern than unsightly piles which can serve as breeding grounds for insect vectors. A better solution is to recover materials for use in new components. Not only does this resolve the landfill issue, but it also serves to conserve resources, while returning an economic benefit to society. This paper traces the introduction of tire material recovery at NRI Industries and DaimlerChrysler Corporation (DCC), the development of the infrastructure and materials, and the launch of the Jeep Grand Cherokee thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) radiator seals, comprised of post consumer tire crumb.
Technical Paper

Testing Elastomers - Can Correlation Be Achieved Between Machines, Load Cells, Fixtures and Operators?

2001-04-30
2001-01-1443
At present, testing elastomeric parts is performed at a level dictated by the users of the testing equipment. No society or testing group has defined a formal standard of testing or a way to calibrate a testing machine. This is in part due to the difficulty involved with testing a material whose properties are in a constant state of flux. To further complicate this issue, testing equipment, testing procedures, fixtures, and a host of other variables including the operators themselves, all can have an impact on the characterization of elastomers. The work presented in this paper looks at identifying some of the variables of testing between machines, load cells, fixtures and operators. It also shows that correlation can be achieved and should be performed between companies to ensure data integrity.
X