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Technical Paper

A Technique to Predict Thermal Buckling in Automotive Body Panels by Coupling Heat Transfer and Structural Analysis

2014-04-01
2014-01-0943
This paper describes a comprehensive methodology for the simulation of vehicle body panel buckling in an electrophoretic coat (electro-coat or e-coat) and/or paint oven environment. The simulation couples computational heat transfer analysis and structural analysis. Heat transfer analysis is used to predict temperature distribution throughout a vehicle body in curing ovens. The vehicle body temperature profile from the heat transfer analysis is applied as an input for a structural analysis to predict buckling. This study is focused on the radiant section of the curing ovens. The radiant section of the oven has the largest temperature gradients within the body structure. This methodology couples a fully transient thermal analysis to simulate the structure through the electro-coat and paint curing environments with a structural, buckling analysis.
Technical Paper

Communication Requirements for Plug-In Electric Vehicles

2011-04-12
2011-01-0866
This paper is the second in the series of documents designed to record the progress of a series of SAE documents - SAE J2836™, J2847, J2931, & J2953 - within the Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Communication Task Force. This follows the initial paper number 2010-01-0837, and continues with the test and modeling of the various PLC types for utility programs described in J2836/1™ & J2847/1. This also extends the communication to an off-board charger, described in J2836/2™ & J2847/2 and includes reverse energy flow described in J2836/3™ and J2847/3. The initial versions of J2836/1™ and J2847/1 were published early 2010. J2847/1 has now been re-opened to include updates from comments from the National Institute of Standards Technology (NIST) Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP), Smart Grid Architectural Committee (SGAC) and Cyber Security Working Group committee (SCWG).
Technical Paper

Virtual Road Load Data Acquisition using Full Vehicle Simulations

2013-04-08
2013-01-1189
The concept of full vehicle simulation has been embraced by the automobile industry as it is an indispensable tool for analyzing vehicles. Vehicle loads traditionally obtained by road load data acquisition such as wheel forces are typically not invariant as they depend on the vehicle that was used for the measurement. Alternatively, virtual road load data acquisition approach has been adopted in industry to derive invariant loads. Analytical loads prior to building hardware prototypes can shorten development cycles and save costs associated with data acquisition. The approach described herein estimate realistic component load histories with sufficient accuracy and reasonable effort using full vehicle simulations. In this study, a multi-body dynamic model of the vehicle was built and simulated over digitized road using ADAMS software, and output responses were correlated to a physical vehicle that was driven on the same road.
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