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Technical Paper

A New Clutch Actuation System for Dry DCT

2015-04-14
2015-01-1118
Dry dual clutch transmission (DCT) has played an important role in the high performance applications as well as low-cost market sectors in Asia, with a potential as the future mainstream transmission technology due to its high mechanical efficiency and driving comfort. Control system simplification and cost reduction has been critical in making dry DCT more competitive against other transmission technologies. Specifically, DCT clutch actuation system is a key component with a great potential for cost-saving as well as performance improvement. In this paper, a new motor driven clutch actuator with a force-aid lever has been proposed. A spring is added to assist clutch apply that can effectively reduce the motor size and energy consumption. The goal of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of this new clutch actuator, and the force-aid lever actuator's principle, physical structure design, and validation results are discussed in details.
Technical Paper

A System Safety Perspective into Chevy Bolt’s One Pedal Driving

2019-04-02
2019-01-0133
The Chevy Bolt’s One Pedal Driving feature is a new electrification propulsion enhancement that allows the driver to accelerate, decelerate and hold their vehicle stationary by just using the accelerator pedal. With this new feature, the driver is relieved of having to switch between pressing the accelerator pedal and brake pedal to slow, stop and hold the vehicle stationary. While this feature provides a convenience to the driver, it also presents a paradigm shift in driver engagement and control system responsibility for executing certain functions that the driver was traditionally responsible to perform. Various system safety techniques were involved in the development of such a feature both from a traditional functional safety perspective as well as a Safety of the Intended Functionality (SOTIF) perspective.
Technical Paper

Design and Implementation of a Distributed Thermal Control System for Power Electronics Components in Hybrid Vehicles

2019-04-02
2019-01-0501
Hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles (BEV) use power electronics (PE) devices to convert between high voltage DC power of the battery and other formats of power. These PE components requires operation within certain temperature range, otherwise, overheating causes component as well as vehicle performance degradation. Therefore, a thermal management system is required for PE components. This paper focuses on the design and development of such a PE components thermal control system. The proposed control system is a distributed thermal control system in which all the PE components are placed in series within one cooling loop. The advantage of the proposed control system is its reduced system complexity, energy efficiency and flexibility to add future PE components. In addition, electric control unit (ECU) are utilized so that complex control algorithms can be implemented.
Technical Paper

Determining the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Benefit of an Adaptive Cruise Control System Using Real-World Driving Data

2019-04-02
2019-01-0310
Adaptive cruise control is an advanced vehicle technology that is unique in its ability to govern vehicle behavior for extended periods of distance and time. As opposed to standard cruise control, adaptive cruise control can remain active through moderate to heavy traffic congestion, and can more effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Its ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is derived primarily from two physical phenomena: platooning and controlled acceleration. Platooning refers to reductions in aerodynamic drag resulting from opportunistic following distances from the vehicle ahead, and controlled acceleration refers to the ability of adaptive cruise control to accelerate the vehicle in an energy efficient manner. This research calculates the measured greenhouse gas emissions benefit of adaptive cruise control on a fleet of 51 vehicles over 62 days and 199,300 miles.
Technical Paper

Development of General Motors’ eAssist Gen3 Propulsion System

2018-04-03
2018-01-0422
General Motors’ 3rd generation eAssist propulsion systems build upon the experience gained from the 2nd generation 115v system and the 1st generation 36v system. Extensive architectural studies were conducted to optimize the new eAssist system to maintain the performance and fuel economy gains of the 2nd generation 115v system while preserving passenger and cargo space, and reducing cost. Three diverse vehicle applications have been brought to production. They include two similar pickup trucks with 5.3 liter V8 engines and 8 speed transmissions, a 4-door passenger car with 2.5 liter 4 cylinder normally aspirated gasoline engine and a 6-speed automatic transmission, and a crossover SUV with a 2.0-liter turbocharged engine and 9 speed transmission. The key electrification components are a new water cooled induction motor/generator (MG), new water cooled power electronics module, and two major variants of 86v lithium ion battery packs.
Technical Paper

Development of Production Control Algorithms for Hybrid Electric Vehicles by Using System Simulation: Technology Leadership Brief

2012-10-08
2012-01-9008
In an earlier paper, the authors described how Model-Based System Engineering could be utilized to provide a virtual Hardware-in-the-Loop simulation capability, which creates a framework for the development of virtual ECU software by providing a platform upon which embedded control algorithms may be developed, tested, updated, and validated. The development of virtual ECU software is increasingly valuable in automotive control system engineering because vehicle systems are becoming more complex and tightly integrated, which requires that interactions between subsystems be evaluated during the design process. Variational analysis and robustness studies are also important and become more difficult to perform with real hardware as system complexity increases. The methodology described in this paper permits algorithm development to be performed prior to the availability of vehicle and control system hardware by providing what is essentially a virtual integration vehicle.
Book

Dynamic Analysis and Control System Design of Automatic Transmissions

2013-02-12
While the basic working principle and the mechanical construction of automatic transmissions has not changed significantly, increased requirements for performance, fuel economy, and drivability, as well as the increasing number of gears has made it more challenging to design the systems that control modern automatic transmissions. New types of transmissions—continuously variable transmissions (CVT), dual clutch transmissions (DCT), and hybrid powertrains—have presented added challenges. Gear shifting in today’s automatic transmissions is a dynamic process that involves synchronized torque transfer from one clutch to another, smooth engine speed change, engine torque management, and minimization of output torque disturbance. Dynamic analysis helps to understand gear shifting mechanics and supports creation of the best design for gear shift control systems in passenger cars, trucks, buses, and commercial vehicles.
Technical Paper

Model Predictive Control of Turbocharged Gasoline Engines for Mass Production

2018-04-03
2018-01-0875
This paper describes the design of a multivariable, constrained Model Predictive Control (MPC) system for torque tracking in turbocharged gasoline engines scheduled for production by General Motors starting in calendar year 2018. The control system has been conceived and co-developed by General Motors and ODYS. The control approach consists of a set of linear MPC controllers scheduled in real time based on engine operating conditions. For each MPC controller, a linear model is obtained by system identification with data collected from engines. The control system coordinates throttle, wastegate, intake and exhaust cams in real time to track a desired engine torque profile, based on measurements and estimates of engine torque and intake manifold pressure.
Technical Paper

Model-Based Systems Engineering and Control System Development via Virtual Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation

2010-10-19
2010-01-2325
Model-based control system design improves quality, shortens development time, lowers engineering cost, and reduces rework. Evaluating a control system's performance, functionality, and robustness in a simulation environment avoids the time and expense of developing hardware and software for each design iteration. Simulating the performance of a design can be straightforward (though sometimes tedious, depending on the complexity of the system being developed) with mathematical models for the hardware components of the system (plant models) and control algorithms for embedded controllers. This paper describes a software tool and a methodology that not only allows a complete system simulation to be performed early in the product design cycle, but also greatly facilitates the construction of the model by automatically connecting the components and subsystems that comprise it.
Technical Paper

Supervisory Model Predictive Control of a Powertrain with a Continuously Variable Transmission

2018-04-03
2018-01-0860
This paper describes the design of a supervisory multivariable constrained Model Predictive Control (MPC) system for driver requested axle torque tracking with real-time fuel economy optimization that is scheduled for production by General Motors starting in 2018. The control system has been conceived and co-developed by General Motors and ODYS. The control approach consists of a set of linear MPC controllers scheduled in real-time based on powertrain operating conditions. For each MPC controller, a linear model is obtained by system identification with vehicle and dynamometer data. The supervisory MPC coordinates in real time desired Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) ratio and desired engine torque to satisfy the system requirements, based on estimates of axle torque and engine fuel rate, by solving a constrained optimization problem at each sampling step. Each linear MPC controller is equipped with a Kalman filter to reconstruct the system state from available measurements.
Technical Paper

Transfer Function Generation for Model Abstraction Using Static Analysis

2017-03-28
2017-01-0010
Currently, Model Based Development (MBD) is the de-facto methodology in automotive industry. This has led to conversions of legacy code to Simulink models. Our previous work was related to implementing the C2M tool to automatically convert legacy code to Simulink models. While the tool has been implemented and deployed on few OEM pilot code-sets there were several improvement areas identified w.r.t. the generated models. One of the improvement areas identified was that the generated model used atomic blocks instead of abstracted blocks available in Simulink. E.g. the generated model used an ADD block and feedback loop to represent an integration operation instead of using an integrator block directly. This reduced the readability of the model even though the functionality was correct. Thus, as a user of the model, an engineer would like to see abstract blocks rather than atomic blocks.
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