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Technical Paper

A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Model for Gear Churning

2018-04-03
2018-01-0401
This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for predicting power losses associated with churning of oil by gears or other similar rotating components. The modeling approach and parameters are optimized to ensure the accuracy, robustness, and computational efficiency of these predictions. These studies include a look at two types of mesh and a turbulence model selection. The focus is on multiple reference frame (MRF) modeling technique for its computational efficiency advantage. Model predictions are compared to previously published experimental data [1] under varying operating conditions typical for an automotive transmission application. The model shows good agreement with the hardware both quantitatively and qualitatively, capturing the trends with speed and submersion level. The paper concludes with presenting some key lessons learned, and recommendation for future work to ultimately build a highly reliable tool as part of the virtual product development.
Technical Paper

A Mechanism-Based Thermomechanical Fatigue Life Assessment Method for High Temperature Engine Components with Gradient Effect Approximation

2019-04-02
2019-01-0536
High temperature components in internal combustion engines and exhaust systems must withstand severe mechanical and thermal cyclic loads throughout their lifetime. The combination of thermal transients and mechanical load cycling results in a complex evolution of damage, leading to thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) of the material. Analytical tools are increasingly employed by designers and engineers for component durability assessment well before any hardware testing. The DTMF model for TMF life prediction, which assumes that micro-crack growth is the dominant damage mechanism, is capable of providing reliable predictions for a wide range of high-temperature components and materials in internal combustion engines. Thus far, the DTMF model has employed a local approach where surface stresses, strains, and temperatures are used to compute damage for estimating the number of cycles for a small initial defect or micro-crack to reach a critical length.
Technical Paper

A Structural Stress Recovery Procedure for Fatigue Life Assessment of Welded Structures

2017-03-28
2017-01-0343
Over the decades, several attempts have been made to develop new fatigue analysis methods for welded joints since most of the incidents in automotive structures are joints related. Therefore, a reliable and effective fatigue damage parameter is needed to properly predict the failure location and fatigue life of these welded structures to reduce the hardware testing, time, and the associated cost. The nodal force-based structural stress approach is becoming widely used in fatigue life assessment of welded structures. In this paper, a new nodal force-based structural stress recovery procedure is proposed that uses the least squares method to linearly smooth the stresses in elements along the weld line. Weight function is introduced to give flexibility in choosing different weighting schemes between elements. Two typical weighting schemes are discussed and compared.
Technical Paper

Analytical Evaluation of Engine and Vehicle Hardware Effects on Vehicle Response

2019-04-02
2019-01-1283
As the proliferation of downsized boosted engines continues, it becomes increasingly important to understand how engine and vehicle hardware impact vehicle transient response. Several different methodologies can be used to understand hardware impacts, such as vehicle testing, 0-D vehicle models, and constant engine speed load steps. The next evolution of predicting vehicle transient response is to transition to a system level vehicle analysis by coupling a detailed engine model, utilizing crank angle resolved calculations, with a simple vehicle model. This allows for the evaluation of engine and vehicle hardware effects on vehicle acceleration and the rate of change of vehicle acceleration, or jerk, and the tradeoffs that can be made between the hardware in early program development. By comparing this system level vehicle model to the different methodologies, it can be shown that a system level vehicle analysis allows for higher fidelity evaluations of vehicle transient response.
Journal Article

Brake System Performance at Higher Mileage

2017-09-17
2017-01-2502
The purchase of a new automobile is unquestionably a significant investment for most customers, and with this recognition, comes a correspondingly significant expectation for quality and reliability. Amongst automotive systems -when it comes to considerations of reliability - the brakes (perhaps along with the tires) occupy a rarified position of being located in a harsh environment, subjected to continuous wear throughout their use, and are critical to the safe performance of the vehicle. Maintenance of the brake system is therefore a fact of life for most drivers - something that almost everyone must do, yet given the potentially considerable expense, it is something that of great benefit to minimize.
Technical Paper

Cascaded Dual Extended Kalman Filter for Combined Vehicle State Estimation and Parameter Identification

2013-04-08
2013-01-0691
This paper proposes a model-based “Cascaded Dual Extended Kalman Filter” (CDEKF) for combined vehicle state estimation, namely, tire vertical forces and parameter identification. A sensitivity analysis is first carried out to recognize the vehicle inertial parameters that have significant effects on tire normal forces. Next, the combined estimation process is separated in two components. The first component is designed to identify the vehicle mass and estimate the longitudinal forces while the second component identifies the location of center of gravity and estimates the tire normal forces. A Dual extended Kalman filter is designed for each component for combined state estimation and parameter identification. Simulation results verify that the proposed method can precisely estimate the tire normal forces and accurately identify the inertial parameters.
Technical Paper

Characterization of Seat Lateral Support as a Mechanical Behavior

2020-04-14
2020-01-0870
Seat lateral support is often talked about as a design parameter, but usually in terms of psychological perception. There are many difficulties in quantifying lateral support mechanically to the engineering teams: Anthropometric variation causes different people to interact with the seat in different places and at different angles, BPD studies are usually planar and don’t distinguish between horizontal support and vertical resistance to sinking in, most mechanical test systems are typically single-DOF and can’t apply vertical and horizontal loads concurrently, and there is scant literature describing the actual lateral loads of occupants. In this study, we characterize the actual lateral loading on example seating from various sized/shaped occupants according to dynamic pressure distribution. From this information, a six-DOF load and position control test robot (KUKA OccuBot) is used to replicate that pressure distribution.
Technical Paper

Combined Drag and Cooling Optimization of a Car Vehicle with an Adjoint-Based Approach

2018-04-03
2018-01-0721
The main objective of this work is to present an adjoint-based methodology to address combined optimization of drag force and cooling flow rate of an industrial vehicle. In order to cope with cooling effect, the volumetric flow rate is treated through a newly introduced cost function and the corresponding adjoint source term is derived. Also an alternative strategy is presented to tackle aerodynamic vehicle design improvement that relies on a so-called indirect force computation. The overall optimization is treated as a Multi-Objective problem and an original approach, called Optimize Both Favor One (OBFO), is introduced that allows selective emphasis on one or another objective without resorting to artificial cost function balancing. Finally, comparative results are presented to demonstrate the merit of the proposed methodology.
Technical Paper

Crash-induced Loads in Liftgate Latching Systems

2018-04-03
2018-01-1333
Automotive liftgate latches have been subject to regulation for minimum strength and inertial resistance requirements since the late 1990’s in the US and globally since the early 2000’s, possibly due to liftgate ejections stemming from the first generation Chrysler minivans which employed latches that were not originally designed with this hazard in mind. Side door latches have been regulated since the 1960’s, and the regulation of liftgate, or back door latches, have been based largely on side door requirements, with the exception of the orthogonal test requirement that is liftgate specific. Based on benchmarking tests of liftgate latches, most global OEM’s design their latches to exceed the minimum regulatory requirements. Presumably, this is based on the need to keep doors closed during crashes and specifically to do so when subjected to industry standard tests.
Technical Paper

Design for crashworthiness optimization using the meta-modeling technique with extended-HCA framework

2020-04-14
2020-01-0627
In most engineering design problems, it is either difficult or impossible to directly couple the analyzing tool (e.g., finite element analysis) with the optimization algorithms. For instance, in the design optimization for crashworthiness, the implicit relationship between the design parameters and the crash indicators are not generally available. Moreover, the computational cost associated with repeated explicit finite element analysis of a crash simulation is substantial. Therefore, surrogate modeling or meta-model-based analysis have been widely used to solve such optimization problems. Among the different techniques, Kriging meta-model has shown good accuracy for highly non-linear problems. In this study, the extended Hybrid Cellular Automaton (xHCA) framework is employed to design for targeting desired crash indicators (maximum intrusion and maximum deceleration).
Technical Paper

Determining the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Benefit of an Adaptive Cruise Control System Using Real-World Driving Data

2019-04-02
2019-01-0310
Adaptive cruise control is an advanced vehicle technology that is unique in its ability to govern vehicle behavior for extended periods of distance and time. As opposed to standard cruise control, adaptive cruise control can remain active through moderate to heavy traffic congestion, and can more effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Its ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is derived primarily from two physical phenomena: platooning and controlled acceleration. Platooning refers to reductions in aerodynamic drag resulting from opportunistic following distances from the vehicle ahead, and controlled acceleration refers to the ability of adaptive cruise control to accelerate the vehicle in an energy efficient manner. This research calculates the measured greenhouse gas emissions benefit of adaptive cruise control on a fleet of 51 vehicles over 62 days and 199,300 miles.
Technical Paper

Development of GM Allison 10-Speed Heavy Duty Transmission

2020-04-14
2020-01-0438
This paper describes the development of the GM Allison 10-Speed Heavy Duty (HD) Transmission. The trend of increased towing capacity and engine horsepower in the automotive heavy-duty truck segment has been steadily climbing for the past 10 years. The development of 10-Speed HD Transmission is designed to be best in class in for towing performance in the 2500/3500 series segment while optimizing fuel economy. The 10-Speed HD Transmission also gives the customers the option to order an integrated power take-off (PTO) unit that benefits downstream installation of utility accessories such as hydraulic pumps, generators, etc.
Technical Paper

Development of an Alternative Predictive Model for Gasoline Vehicle Particulate Matter and Particulate Number

2019-04-02
2019-01-1184
The Particulate Matter Index (PMI) is a helpful tool which provides an indication of a fuel’s sooting tendency. Currently, the index is being used by various laboratories and OEMs as a metric to understand the gasoline fuels impact on both sooting found on engine hardware and vehicle out emissions. This paper will explore a new method that could be used to give indication of the sooting tendency of the gasoline range fuels, called the Particulate Evaluation Index (PEI), and provide the detailed equation in its initial form. In addition, the PEI will be shown to have a good correlation agreement to PMI. The paper will then give a detailed explanation of the data used to develop it. Initial vehicle PM/PN data will also be presented that shows correlations of the indices to the vehicle response.
Technical Paper

Dynamics of Water Crossover in Fuel Cell and Application to Freeze Driveaway Reliability

2020-04-14
2020-01-0853
Reliable driveaway from frozen condition is one of the challenging design and control problem for fuel cell applications. Different approaches for warmup from frozen conditions have been developed by OEMs, e.g. low voltage inefficient operation, or use of coolant heaters. However, most methods result in water generation which risk icing and blocking the valves and rendering them nonfunctional till they thaw. One such valve is the anode drain valve which is needed to remove water that crosses over across the membrane to anode side. This work discusses characterization of dynamics of water crossover to anode balance of plant via step response experiments on full scale systems, and development of an online estimator to detect onset of anode water crossover via this online observer. In addition, detection via voltage dip-based feedback is also presented.
Technical Paper

Effect of Intake Valve Profile Modulation on Passenger Car Fuel Consumption

2018-04-03
2018-01-0379
Variable valve actuation is a focus to improve fuel efficiency for passenger car engines. Various means to implement early and late intake valve closing (E/LIVC) at lower load operating conditions is investigated. The study uses GT Power to simulate on E/LIVC on a 2.5 L gasoline engine, in-line four cylinder, four valve per cylinder engine to evaluate different ways to achieve Atkinson cycle performance. EIVC and LIVC are proven methods to reduce the compression-to-expansion ratio of the engine at part load and medium load operation. Among the LIVC strategies, two non-traditional intake valve lift profiles are investigated to understand their impact on reduction of fuel consumption at low engine loads. Both the non-traditional lift profiles retain the same maximum lift as a normal intake valve profile (Otto-cycle) unlike a traditional LIVC profile (Atkinson cycle) which needs higher maximum lift.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of High Resistance Connection in Automotive Application

2020-04-14
2020-01-0926
Electrical connections have a normal operational temperature range. A high resistance, such as a poor connection, in an electrical circuit has been reported to cause a temperature increase exceeding normal operational range at the connection. This study measures the temperature increase in a typical automotive bolted battery cable connection with low to zero torque values and simulated high resistance under different load conditions. The torque is changed from maximum design value to 0 Nm and the temperature increase at the connection is measured. The high resistance connections, manually created by adjusting the contacts, are tested for several power loss values at the connection. The temperature rise under these conditions at the connection is measured and subsequently recorded. The maximum temperature increase at the bolted cable connection recorded at low torque values including 0 Nm torque compared to the maximum typical design value of 17 Nm is 10.5 °C.
Technical Paper

General Motors Hydra-Matic 9T50 Automatic Transaxle

2018-04-03
2018-01-0391
General Motors Global Propulsion Systems’ first nine-speed automatic transmission makes its debut in the 2017 Chevrolet Malibu, advancing a legacy of multispeed transmissions designed to optimize efficiency, performance and refinement. The Hydra-Matic 9T50 nine-speed is paired with a Ecotech 2.0L Turbo engine in the Malibu, contributing to an EPA estimated 33 mpg highway, a three-percent increase over the 2016 Malibu with an eight-speed automatic paired to the same engine. The 9T50 has a wider 7.6:1 overall ratio, which is the ratio between the first gear ratio and the top gear ratio, - compared to the six-speed’s 6.0:1 ratio. The 9T50 is fitted with a “deep” 4.69 first gear ratio for excellent off-the-line acceleration and a “tall” 0.62 top gear ratio for low-rpm highway cruising. That balance optimizes acceleration and fuel economy while reducing engine noise during cruising.
Journal Article

General Motors’ New Reduced Scale Wind Tunnel Center

2017-03-28
2017-01-1534
The General Motors Reduced Scale Wind Tunnel Facility, which came into operation in the fall of 2015, is a new state-of-the-art scale model aerodynamic test facility that expands GM’s test capabilities. The new facility also increases GM’s aerodynamic testing through-put and provides the resources needed to achieve the growing demand for higher fuel economy requirements for next generation of vehicles. The wind tunnel was designed for a nominal model scale of 40%. The nozzle and test section were sized to keep wind tunnel interference effects to a minimum. Flow quality and other wind tunnel performance parameters are on par with or better than the latest industry standards. A 5-belt system with a long center belt and boundary layer suction and blowing system are used to model underbody flow conditions. An overhead probe traverse system is installed in the test section along with a model positioning robot used to move the model in an out of the test section.
Technical Paper

Hydraulically Damped Rubber Body Mounts with High Lateral Rate for Improved Vehicle Noise, Vibration and Ride Qualities

2013-05-13
2013-01-1906
In today's competitive market, noise and vibration are among the most important parameters that impact the success of a vehicle. In body-on-frame construction vehicles, elastomeric body mounts play a major role in isolating the passenger compartment from road noise, harshness, shake, and other vibrations in the chassis as well as improving ride quality across a wide frequency range. This paper describes the work carried out to design a fluid filled mount with high lateral stiffness that can alter the perceived Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH) performance of current production body-on-frame trucks. It was found that the quietness and ride qualities can be significantly improved by positioning the glycol-filled mounts at the anti-node of the frame first vertical bending mode; under the C-pillar intersection with the frame. The performance of mounts in this area is known to be critical to ride quality.
Technical Paper

Identification of Organic Acids in Used Engine Oil Residues by Pyrolysis-Comprehensive 2D Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

2016-10-17
2016-01-2274
The amount of acidic material in used engine oil is considered an indicator of the remaining useful life of the oil. Total acid number, determined by titration, is the most widely accepted method for determining acidic content but the method is not capable of speciation of individual acids. In this work, high molecular weight residue was isolated from used engine oil by dialysis in heptane. This residue was then analyzed using pyrolysis-comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Carboxylic acids from C2-C18 were identified in the samples with acetic acid found to be the most abundant. This identification provides new information that may be used to improve the current acid detection methodologies for used engine oils.
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