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Technical Paper

A Unified, Scalable and Replicable Approach to Development, Implementation and HIL Evaluation of Autonomous Shuttles for Use in a Smart City

2019-04-02
2019-01-0493
As the technology in autonomous vehicle and smart city infrastructure is developing fast, the idea of smart city and automated driving has become a present and near future reality. Both Highway Chauffeur and low speed shuttle applications are tested recently in different research to test the feasibility of autonomous vehicles and automated driving. Based on examples available in the literature and the past experience of the authors, this paper proposes the use of a unified computing, sensing, communication and actuation architecture for connected and automated driving. It is postulated that this unified architecture will also lead to a scalable and replicable approach. Two vehicles representing a passenger car and a small electric shuttle for smart mobility in a smart city are chosen as the two examples for demonstrating scalability and replicability.
Technical Paper

Accuracy Assessment of Three-Dimensional Site Features Generated with Aid of Photogrammetric Epipolar Lines in PhotoModeler and Using Minimal sUAS Imagery

2019-04-02
2019-01-0410
Photogrammetry is widely used in the accident reconstruction community to extract three-dimensional information from photographs. This article extends a prior study conducted by the authors, whereby model accuracy was assessed for a technique that exploited vehicle edges and epipolar line projections to construct 3D vehicle models, by examining 3D roadway and site features. To do so, artificial images were generated using an ideal computer-generated camera within a computer-assisted drawing environment to allow for a known reference model to compare with results produced using photogrammetry. A systematic study was undertaken by modeling the curvature, elevation, and super-elevation of a roadway and associated markings, sidewalks, and buildings, either by relying on discrete points or utilizing epipolar lines. The models were assessed for accuracy, and the sensitivity of the accuracy to camera elevation was considered.
Technical Paper

Acoustic Characteristics of Automotive Catalytic Converter Assemblies

2004-03-08
2004-01-1002
An experimental study of the acoustic characteristics of automotive catalytic converters is presented. The investigation addresses the effects and relative importance of the elements comprising a production catalytic converter assembly including the housing, substrate, mat and seals. Attenuation characteristics are measured for one circular and one oval catalytic converter geometry, each having 400 cell per square inch substrates. For each geometry, experimental results are presented to address the effect of individual components in isolation, and in combination with other assembly components. Additional experiments investigate the significance of acoustic paths around the substrate and through the peripheral wall of the substrate. The experimental results are compared to address the significance of each component on the overall attenuation.
Technical Paper

Adaptation of TruckSim Models to Simulate Experimental Heavy Truck Hard Braking Test Data Under Various Levels of Brake Disablement

2010-10-05
2010-01-1920
This research focuses on the development and performance of analytical models to simulate a tractor-semitrailer in straight-ahead braking. The simulations were modified and tuned to simulate full-treadle braking with all brakes functioning correctly, as well as the behavior of the tractor-semitrailer rig under full braking with selected brakes disabled. The models were constructed in TruckSim and based on a tractor-semitrailer used in dry braking performance testing. The full-scale vehicle braking research was designed to define limits for engineering estimates on stopping distance when Class 8 air-braked vehicles experience partial degradation of the foundation brake system. In the full scale testing, stops were conducted from 30 mph and 60 mph, with the combination loaded to 80,000 lbs (gross combined weight or GCW), half payload, and with the tractor-semitrailer unladen (lightly loaded vehicle weight, or LLVW).
Technical Paper

Application of Adversarial Networks for 3D Structural Topology Optimization

2019-04-02
2019-01-0829
Topology optimization is a branch of structural optimization which solves an optimal material distribution problem. The resulting structural topology, for a given set of boundary conditions and constraints, has an optimal performance (e.g. minimum compliance). Conventional 3D topology optimization algorithms achieve quality optimized results; however, it is an extremely computationally intensive task which is, in general, impractical and computationally unachievable for real-world structural optimal design processes. Therefore, the current development of rapid topology optimization technology is experiencing a major drawback. To address the issues, a new approach is presented to utilize the powerful abilities of large deep learning models to replicate this design process for 3D structures. Adversarial models, primarily Wasserstein Generative Adversarial Networks (WGAN), are constructed which consist of 2 deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) namely, a discriminator and a generator.
Technical Paper

Biologically Inspired, Intelligent Muscle Material for Sensing and Responsive Delivery of Countermeasures

2000-07-10
2000-01-2514
The design and development of new biologically inspired technologies based on intelligent materials that are capable of sensing the levels of target biomolecules and, if needed, trigger appropriate countermeasures to regulate biological processes and rhythms of the astronauts is being undertaken in our laboratories. This is accomplished by coupling biologically inspired sensors that monitor the levels of the target biomolecules with intelligent polymeric materials that can regulate the release of a countermeasure. The technology developed here integrates sensors and artificial muscle material into a self-regulating device that can perform with minimal crew intervention. Further, it takes advantage of microfabrication technology to construct lightweight and robust responsive delivery systems. These “intelligent” devices address the need for the control and regulation of biological processes and rhythms under spaceflight conditions.
Journal Article

Comparative Assessment of Frequency Dependent Joint Properties Using Direct and Inverse Identification Methods

2015-06-15
2015-01-2229
Elastomeric joints are utilized in many automotive applications, and exhibit frequency and excitation amplitude dependent properties. Current methods commonly identify only the cross-point joint property using displacement excitation at stepped single frequencies. This process is often time consuming and is limited to measuring a single dynamic stiffness term of the joint stiffness matrix. This study focuses on developing tractable laboratory inverse experiments to identify frequency dependent stiffness matrices up to 1000 Hz. Direct measurements are performed on a commercial elastomer test system and an inverse experiment consisting of an elastic beam (with a square cross section) attached to a cylindrical elastomeric joint. Sources of error in the inverse methodology are thoroughly examined and explained through simulation which include ill-conditioning of matrices and the sensitivity to modeling error.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Intermediate-Combustion Products Formed in Engine with and without Ignition

1955-01-01
550262
RESULTS of tests performed on a modified type F-4 CFR engine show that precombustion reactions in both the fired and motored engine gave the same carbonyl products. The maximum specific yields of these carbonyls were similar for a given fuel compressed with comparable pressure-time-temperature histories in both motored- and fired-engine tests. As the motored engine seems to duplicate precombustion reactions occurring in a fired engine under normal operating conditions, the authors of this paper conclude that the motored engine, offering ease of control and sampling, is a convenient and valid tool for combustion research.
Technical Paper

Design of Robust Active Load-Dependent Vehicular Suspension Controller via Static Output Feedback

2013-09-24
2013-01-2367
In this paper, we focus on the active vehicular suspension controller design. A quarter-vehicle suspension system is employed in the system analysis and synthesis. Due to the difficulty and cost in the measuring of all the states, we only choose two variables to construct the feedback loop, that is, the control law is a static-output-feedback (SOF) control. However, the sensor reduction would induce challenges in the controller design. One of the main challenges is the NP-hard problem in the corresponding SOF controller design. In order to deal with this challenge, we propose a two-stage design method in which a state-feedback controller is firstly designed and then the state-feedback controller is used to decouple the nonlinear conditions. To better compensate for the varying vehicle load, a robust load-dependent control strategy is adopted. The proposed design methodology is applied to a suspension control example.
Journal Article

Design of a Parallel-Series PHEV for the EcoCAR 2 Competition

2012-09-10
2012-01-1762
The EcoCAR 2: Plugging into the Future team at the Ohio State University is designing a Parallel-Series Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle capable of 50 miles of all-electric range. The vehicle features a 18.9-kWh lithium-ion battery pack with range extending operation in both series and parallel modes made possible by a 1.8-L ethanol (E85) engine and 6-speed automated manual transmission. This vehicle is designed to drastically reduce fuel consumption, with a utility factor weighted fuel economy of 75 miles per gallon gasoline equivalent (mpgge), while meeting Tier II Bin 5 emissions standards. This report details the rigorous design process followed by the Ohio State team during Year 1 of the competition. The design process includes identifying the team customer's needs and wants, selecting an overall vehicle architecture and completing detailed design work on the mechanical, electrical and control systems. This effort was made possible through support from the U.S.
Journal Article

Development of Refined Clutch-Damper Subsystem Dynamic Models Suitable for Time Domain Studies

2015-06-15
2015-01-2180
This study examines clutch-damper subsystem dynamics under transient excitation and validates predictions using a new laboratory experiment (which is the subject of a companion paper). The proposed models include multi-staged stiffness and hysteresis elements as well as spline nonlinearities. Several example cases such as two high (or low) hysteresis clutches in series with a pre-damper are considered. First, detailed multi-degree of freedom nonlinear models are constructed, and their time domain predictions are validated by analogous measurements. Second, key damping sources that affect transient events are identified and appropriate models or parameters are selected or justified. Finally, torque impulses are evaluated using metrics, and their effects on driveline dynamics are quantified. Dynamic interactions between clutch-damper and spline backlash nonlinearities are briefly discussed.
Technical Paper

Development of Virtual Fuel Economy Trend Evaluation Process

2019-04-02
2019-01-0510
With the advancement of the autonomous vehicle development, the different possibilities of improving fuel economy have increased significantly by changing the driver or powertrain response under different traffic conditions. Development of new fuel-efficient driving strategies requires extensive experiments and simulations in traffic. In this paper, a fuel efficiency simulator environment with existing simulator software such as Simulink, Vissim, Sumo, and CarSim is developed in order to reduce the overall effort required for developing new fuel-efficient algorithms. The simulation environment is created by combining a mid-sized sedan MATLAB-Simulink powertrain model with a realistic microscopic traffic simulation program. To simulate the traffic realistically, real roads from urban and highway sections are modeled in the simulator with different traffic densities.
Technical Paper

Development of the Design of a Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle for the EcoCAR 3 Competition

2016-04-05
2016-01-1257
The design of a performance hybrid electric vehicle includes a wide range of architecture possibilities. A large part of the design process is identifying reasonable vehicle architectures and vehicle performance capabilities. The Ohio State University EcoCAR 3 team designed a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) post-transmission parallel 2016 Chevrolet Camaro. With the end-goal of reducing the environmental impact of the vehicle, the Ohio State Camaro has been designed with a 44-mile all-electric range. It also features an 18.9 kWh Li-ion energy storage system, a 119 kW 2.0L GDI I4 engine that runs on 85% ethanol (E85) fuel, a 5-speed automated manual transmission, and a 150 kW peak electric machine. This report details the design and modeling process followed by the Ohio State team during Year 1 of the competition. The process included researching the customer needs of the vehicle, determining team design goals, initial modeling, and selecting a vehicle architecture.
Journal Article

Driver’s Response Prediction Using Naturalistic Data Set

2019-04-02
2019-01-0128
Evaluating the safety of Autonomous Vehicles (AV) is a challenging problem, especially in traffic conditions involving dynamic interactions. A thorough evaluation of the vehicle’s decisions at all possible critical scenarios is necessary for estimating and validating its safety. However, predicting the response of the vehicle to dynamic traffic conditions can be the first step in the complex problem of understanding vehicle’s behavior. This predicted response of the vehicle can be used in validating vehicle’s safety. In this paper, models based on Machine Learning were explored for predicting and classifying driver’s response. The Naturalistic Driving Study dataset (NDS), which is part of the Strategic Highway Research Program-2 (SHRP2) was used for training and validating these Machine Learning models.
Journal Article

Ductile Fracture Prediction of Automotive Suspension Components

2017-03-28
2017-01-0318
Characterization of the plastic and ductile fracture behavior of a ferrous casting commonly used for the steering knuckle of an automotive suspension system is presented in this work. Ductile fracture testing for various coupon geometries was conducted to simulate a wide range of stress states. Failure data for the higher stress triaxiality were obtained from tension tests conducted on thin flat specimens, wide flat specimens and axisymmetric specimens with varying notch radii. The data for the lower triaxiality were generated from thin-walled tube specimens subjected to torsional loading and compression tests on cylindrical specimens. The failure envelopes for the material were developed utilizing the test data and finite element (FE) simulations of the corresponding test specimens. Experiments provided the load-displacement response and the location of fracture initiation.
Journal Article

Dynamic Analysis of a Hydraulic Body Mount with Amplitude and Preload Dependence

2017-06-05
2017-01-1909
The application of hydraulic body mounts between a pickup truck frame and cab to reduce freeway hop and smooth road shake has been documented in literature and realized in production vehicles. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential benefits of these devices, often through iterative prototype evaluation. Component dynamic characterization has also shown that these devices exhibit significant dependence to preload and dynamic amplitude; however, analysis of these devices has not addressed these dependences. This paper aims to understand the amplitude and preload dependence on the spectrally-varying properties of a production hydraulic body mount. This double-pumping, three-spring mount construction has a shared compliant element between the two fluid-filled chambers.
Technical Paper

Estimation of Cutting Parameters in Two-Stage Piercing to Reduce Edge Strain Hardening

2019-04-02
2019-01-1092
Edge fracture is a common problem when forming advanced high strength steels (AHSS). A particular case of edge fracture occurs during a collar forming/hole extrusion process, which is widely used in the sheet metal forming industry. This study attempts to relate the edge stretchability in collar forming to the strain hardening along the pierced edge; thus, Finite Element (FE) simulations can be used to reduce the number of experiments required to improve cutting settings for a given material and thickness. Using a complex-phase steel, CP-W 800 with thickness of 4.0 mm, a single-stage piercing operation is compared with a two-stage piercing operation, so called shaving, in terms of strains along the pierced edge, calculated by FE simulation. Results indicated that strains were reduced along the pierced edge by shaving.
Technical Paper

Estimation of Wet Clutch Friction Parameters in Automotive Transmissions

2015-04-14
2015-01-1146
In this paper, a new algorithm for the off-line estimation of wet clutch friction parameters is proposed for automotive transmissions, motivated by the usefulness of such an algorithm for diagnosing the condition of the clutch and transmission fluid in service. We assume that clutch pressure is measured, which is the case in dual clutch transmissions (DCT). The estimation algorithm uses measured rotational speeds and estimated accelerations at the input and output sides of a clutch, measured clutch pressures, and a simplified dynamic model of clutch friction to estimate the viscous and contact components of clutch friction torque. Coefficient of friction data is generated using the contact friction torque. A Stribeck friction model is fit to the data, and parameters in the model are then calculated by applying linear least squares estimation.
Technical Paper

Experimental Investigation on Surge Phenomena in an Automotive Turbocharger Compressor

2018-04-03
2018-01-0976
Downsizing and turbocharging are today considered an effective way to reduce CO2 emissions in automotive gasoline engines, especially for the European and US markets. In the broad field of research and development for engine boosting systems, the instability phenomenon of surge has gathered considerable interest in recent years, as the main limiting factor to high performance boosting and boost pressure control. To this extent, developing an in-depth knowledge of the surge dynamics and on the phenomena governing the transition from stable to unstable operation can provide very valuable information for the design of the intake system and boost pressure control algorithms, allowing optimal boost pressure without compromising the transient response.
Technical Paper

FMVSS 126 Sine with Dwell ESC Regulation Test for Autonomous Vehicles

2019-04-02
2019-01-1011
Electronic stability control (ESC) has been an essential part of road vehicle safety for almost three decades. In April of 2007, the United States federal government issued a regulation to test the validity of ESC in development vehicles, and the regulation is called Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) 126 in North America (NA), and an equivalent test in other countries outside of NA called ECE13-H (Economic Commission for Europe). While these standards have been used to certify ESC in development passenger cars for over a decade, this has not yet been scrutinized for the application of autonomous vehicles. Autonomous cars have sensors and control systems which can be used to improve ESC, where commercial standard vehicles do not.
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