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Technical Paper

A Bayesian Approach for Aggregating Test Data Across Sub-Populations

2005-04-11
2005-01-1775
In the process of conducting a reliability analysis of a system, quite often the population of interest is not homogenous; consisting of sub-populations which arise as production operations are adjusted, component suppliers are changed, etc. While these sub-populations are each unique in many ways, they also have much in common. It is also common for data to be available from a variety of different test regimes, e.g. environmental testing and fleet maintenance observations. Hierarchical Bayesian methods provide an organized, objective means of estimating the reliability of the individual systems, the sub-population reliability as well as the reliability of the entire population. This paper provides an introduction to a Bayesian approach that can be extended for more complicated situations.
Technical Paper

Aerodynamic Drag of Heavy Vehicles (Class 7-8): Simulation and Benchmarking

2000-06-19
2000-01-2209
This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. Experimental validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California (USC). Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) using state-of-the-art techniques.
Journal Article

Comparison of Diesel Spray Combustion in Different High-Temperature, High-Pressure Facilities

2010-10-25
2010-01-2106
Diesel spray experimentation at controlled high-temperature and high-pressure conditions is intended to provide a more fundamental understanding of diesel combustion than can be achieved in engine experiments. This level of understanding is needed to develop the high-fidelity multi-scale CFD models that will be used to optimize future engine designs. Several spray chamber facilities capable of high-temperature, high-pressure conditions typical of engine combustion have been developed, but because of the uniqueness of each facility, there are uncertainties about their operation. For this paper, we describe results from comparative studies using constant-volume vessels at Sandia National Laboratories and IFP.
Technical Paper

DOE's Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag Through Joint Experiments and Computations

2005-11-01
2005-01-3511
At 70 miles per hour, overcoming aerodynamic drag represents about 65% of the total energy expenditure for a typical heavy truck vehicle. The goal of this US Department of Energy supported consortium is to establish a clear understanding of the drag producing flow phenomena. This is being accomplished through joint experiments and computations, leading to the intelligent design of drag reducing devices. This paper will describe our objective and approach, provide an overview of our efforts and accomplishments related to drag reduction devices, and offer a brief discussion of our future direction.
Technical Paper

Detection Reliability Study for Interlayer Cracks

1998-11-09
983125
The Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Nondestructive Inspection Validation Center (FAA-AANC) is currently conducting a detection reliability study pertaining to the detection of cracks in multi-layered aluminum sheets. This paper describes the design, production and characterization of test specimens that are currently being used to conduct third layer Probability of Detection (PoD) experiments. Pertinent aspects of the lap splice joints for Boeing 737 aircraft, Line Numbers 292 - 2565 are included in the test specimens. A preliminary analysis of the data indicates that for some inspectors, traditional measures of performance - in particular PoD curves based on maximum likelihood fit to two-parameter lognormal curve - may be misleading.
Journal Article

Effects of Real-Fluid Thermodynamics on High-Pressure Fuel Injection Processes

2014-04-01
2014-01-1429
This paper first summarizes a new theoretical description that quantifies the effects of real-fluid thermodynamics on liquid fuel injection processes as a function of pressure at typical engine operating conditions. It then focuses on the implications this has on modeling such flows with emphasis on application of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique. The theory explains and quantifies the major differences that occur in the jet dynamics compared to that described by classical spray theory in a manner consistent with experimental observations. In particular, the classical view of spray atomization as an appropriate model at some engine operating conditions is questionable. Instead, non-ideal real-fluid behavior must be taken into account using a multicomponent formulation that applies to hydrocarbon mixtures at high-pressure supercritical conditions.
Technical Paper

Experimental Evaluation of a Prototype Free Piston Engine - Linear Alternator (FPLA) System

2016-04-05
2016-01-0677
This paper describes the experimental evaluation of a prototype free piston engine - linear alternator (FPLA) system developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The opposed piston design was developed to investigate its potential for use in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The system is mechanically simple with two-stroke uniflow scavenging for gas exchange and timed port fuel injection for fuel delivery, i.e. no complex valving. Electrical power is extracted from piston motion through linear alternators which also provide a means for passive piston synchronization through electromagnetic coupling. In an HEV application, this electrical power would be used to charge the batteries. The engine-alternator system was designed, assembled and operated over a 2-year period at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA.
Technical Paper

Formaldehyde Visualization Near Lift-off Location in a Diesel Jet

2006-10-16
2006-01-3434
Formaldehyde (HCHO) near the lift-off location in a reacting diesel jet was visualized using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF). Simultaneous imaging of OH chemiluminescence identified the high-temperature combustion region (lift-off). Experiments were performed in a constant-volume combustion vessel at ambient gas conditions (temperature and oxygen concentration) that generate no-soot, low-soot and moderate-soot diesel jets during mixing-controlled combustion. For no-soot conditions, results show that HCHO is formed upstream of the lift-off location and is consumed downstream of the lift-off length in fuel-rich premixed reaction zones at the jet center. Despite the fuel-rich combustion, and downstream regions that are surrounded by a high-temperature diffusion flame, there is no detectable PAH formation in the no-soot condition.
Journal Article

History v. Simulation: An Analysis of the Drivers of Alternative Energy Vehicle Sales

2016-07-18
2016-01-9142
Simulations of the US light duty vehicle stock help policy makers, investors, and auto manufacturers make informed decisions to influence the future of the stock and its associated green house gas emissions. Such simulations require an underlying framework that captures the key elements of consumer purchasing decisions, which can be uncertain. This uncertainty in a simulation’s logic is usually convolved with uncertainty in the underlying assumptions about the futures of energy prices and technology innovation and availability. By comparing simulated alternative energy vehicle (AEV) sales to historical sales data, one can assess the simulation’s ability to capture the dynamics of consumer choice, independent of many of those underlying uncertainties, thereby determining the factors that most strongly impact sales.
Technical Paper

Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition with a Free Piston: A New Approach to Ideal Otto Cycle Performance

1998-10-19
982484
Sandia National Laboratories has been investigating a new, integrated approach to generating electricity with ultra low emissions and very high efficiency for low power (30 kW) applications such as hybrid vehicles and portable generators. Our approach utilizes a free piston in a double-ended cylinder. Combustion occurs alternately at each cylinder end, with intake/exhaust processes accomplished through a two stroke cycle. A linear alternator is mounted in the center section of the cylinder, serving to both generate useful electrical power and to control the compression ratio by varying the rate of electrical generation. Thus, a mechanically simple geometry results in an electronically controlled variable compression ratio configuration. The capability of the homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion process employed in this engine with regards to reduced emissions and improved thermal efficiency has been investigated using a rapid compression expansion machine.
Technical Paper

Hydrogen Fueled Engines in Hybrid Vehicles

2001-03-05
2001-01-0546
This paper describes the motivation for developing hydrogen-fueled engines for use in hybrid electric vehicles of the future. The ultimate motivation for using hydrogen as an energy carrier is carbon management. However, air quality concerns also provide motivation for developing hydrogen-fueled vehicles. For this reason, we discuss the position of the hydrogen-powered hybrid vehicle within the California Air Resources Board requirement for Zero Emission Vehicles. We describe the expected performance of an electrical generation system powered by a four-stroke, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine for a hydrogen-powered hybrid vehicle. The data show that the engine-out emissions of NOx will allow the vehicle to operate below the Super Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle standard set by the California Air Resources Board. The engine can run on either hydrogen or blends of hydrogen and natural gas. The engine can be optimized for maximum efficiency with low emissions.
Technical Paper

Improving Aircraft Composite Inspections Using Optimized Reference Standards

1998-11-09
983120
The rapidly increasing use of composites on commercial airplanes coupled with the potential for economic savings associated with their use in aircraft structures means that the demand for composite materials technology will continue to increase. Inspecting these composite structures is a critical element in assuring their continued airworthiness. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center, in conjunction with the Commercial Aircraft Composite Repair Committee, is developing a set of composite reference standards to be used in NDT equipment calibration for accomplishment of damage assessment and post-repair inspection of all commercial aircraft composites. In this program, a series of NDI tests on a matrix of composite aircraft structures and prototype reference standards were completed in order to minimize the number of standards needed to carry out composite inspections on aircraft.
Journal Article

Noise Control Capability of Structurally Integrated Resonator Arrays in a Foam-Treated Cylinder

2017-06-05
2017-01-1765
Corrugated-core sandwich structures with integrated acoustic resonator arrays have been of recent interest for launch vehicle noise control applications. Previous tests and analyses have demonstrated the ability of this concept to increase sound absorption and reduce sound transmission at low frequencies. However, commercial aircraft manufacturers often require fibrous or foam blanket treatments for broadband noise control and thermal insulation. Consequently, it is of interest to further explore the noise control benefit and trade-offs of structurally integrated resonators when combined with various degrees of blanket noise treatment in an aircraft-representative cylindrical fuselage system. In this study, numerical models were developed to predict the effect of broadband and multi-tone structurally integrated resonator arrays on the interior noise level of cylindrical vibroacoustic systems.
Technical Paper

Overview of Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories

1999-04-27
1999-01-2246
The objectives of this paper are to describe the ongoing projects in diesel engine combustion research at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to detail recent experimental results. The approach we are employing is to assemble experimental hardware that mimic realistic engine geometries while enabling optical access. For example, we are using multi-cylinder engine heads or one-cylinder versions of production heads mated to one-cylinder engine blocks. Optical access is then obtained through a periscope in an exhaust valve, quartz windows in the piston crown, windows in spacer plates just below the head, or quartz cylinder liners. We have three diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, and a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative diesel fuels.
Technical Paper

Progress in Reducing Aerodynamic Drag for Higher Efficiency of Heavy Duty Trucks (Class 7-8)

1999-04-26
1999-01-2238
This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. In addition, greater use of newly developed computational tools holds promise for reducing the number of prototype tests, for cutting manufacturing costs, and for reducing overall time to market. Experimental verification and validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California. Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and California Institute of Technology using state-of- the-art techniques, with the intention of implementing more complex methods in the future.
Technical Paper

Quantitative Mixing Measurements in a Vaporizing Diesel Spray by Rayleigh Imaging

2007-04-16
2007-01-0647
This paper details the development and application of a Rayleigh imaging technique for quantitative mixing measurements in a vaporizing diesel spray under engine conditions. Experiments were performed in an optically accessible constant-volume combustion vessel that simulated the ambient conditions in a diesel engine. Two-dimensional imaging of Rayleigh scattering from a diesel spray of n-heptane and well-characterized ambient was accomplished by using a 532 nm Nd:YAG laser sheet and a low-noise back-illuminated CCD camera. Methods to minimize interference from unwanted elastic scattering sources (e.g. windows, particles) were investigated and are discussed in detail. The simultaneous measurement of Rayleigh scattering signal from the ambient and from the diesel spray provides important benefits towards making the technique quantitative and accurate.
Technical Paper

Relationship Between Ignition Processes and the Lift-Off Length of Diesel Fuel Jets

2005-10-24
2005-01-3843
The reaction zone of a diesel fuel jet stabilizes at a location downstream of the fuel injector once the initial autoignition phase is over. This distance is referred to as flame lift-off length. Recent investigations have examined the effects of a wide range of parameters (injection pressure, orifice diameter, and ambient gas temperature, density and oxygen concentration) on lift-off length under quiescent diesel conditions. Many of the experimental trends in lift-off length were in agreement with scaling laws developed for turbulent, premixed flame propagation in gas-jet lifted flames at atmospheric conditions. However, several effects did not correlate with the gas-jet scaling laws, suggesting that other mechanisms could be important to lift-off stabilization at diesel conditions. This paper shows experimental evidence that ignition processes affect diesel lift-off stabilization.
Journal Article

Study of Soot Formation and Oxidation in the Engine Combustion Network (ECN), Spray A: Effects of Ambient Temperature and Oxygen Concentration

2013-04-08
2013-01-0901
Within the Engine Combustion Network (ECN) spray combustion research frame, simultaneous line-of-sight laser extinction measurements and laser-induced incandescence (LII) imaging were performed to derive the soot volume fraction (fv). Experiments are conducted at engine-relevant high-temperature and high-pressure conditions in a constant-volume pre-combustion type vessel. The target condition, called "Spray A," uses well-defined ambient (900 K, 60 bar, 22.8 kg/m₃, 15% oxygen) and injector conditions (common rail, 1500 bar, KS1.5/86 nozzle, 0.090 mm orifice diameter, n-dodecane, 363 K). Extinction measurements are used to calibrate LII images for quantitative soot distribution measurements at cross sections intersecting the spray axis. LII images are taken after the start of injection where quasi-stationary combustion is already established.
Journal Article

The Future Adoption and Benefit of Electric Vehicles: A Parametric Assessment

2013-04-08
2013-01-0502
We present a parametric analysis of electric vehicle (EV) adoption rates and the corresponding contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction in the US light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet through 2050. The analysis is performed with a system dynamics based model of the supply-demand interactions among the fleet, its fuels, and the corresponding primary energy sources. The differentiating feature of the model is the ability to conduct global sensitivity and parametric trade-space analyses. We find that many factors impact the adoption rates of EVs. These include, in particular, policy initiatives that encourage consumers to consider lifetime ownership costs, the price of oil, battery performance, as well as the pace of technological development for all powertrains (conventional internal combustion engines included). Widespread EV adoption can have noticeable impact on petroleum consumption and GHG emissions by the LDV fleet.
Journal Article

Thermal Response and Flammability of Li-Ion Cells for HEV and PHEV Applications

2008-04-14
2008-01-0400
Lithium-Ion batteries are being considered as a high-energy density replacement for Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) batteries in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) and in the new Plug-In Hybrids (PHEVs). Although these cells can result in significant reduction in weight and volume, they have several safety related issues that still need to be addressed. We report here on the thermal response of Li-ion cells specifically assembled in our laboratory to test new materials, electrolytes and additives. Improvements in the thermal abuse tolerance of cells will be presented and discussed in terms of the need for overall battery system safety.
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