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Technical Paper

A Bench Technique for Evaluating High Temperature Oxidation and Corrosion Tendencies of Automotive Crankcase Lubricants

1968-02-01
680538
A technique for evaluating high temperature oxidation and corrosion tendencies of automotive crankcase lubricants is described. The technique utilizes a versatile bench apparatus which, with a minimum of modification, can be used for either evaluating thermal oxidation stability of gear lubricants or oxidation-corrosion tendencies of automotive crankcase lubricants. The apparatus is relatively compact and requires a minimal lubricant sample. Design of the apparatus permits close control of all operating parameters and provides satisfactory test data repeatability. Retainable copper-lead test bearings are used as the indicator in predicting a pass or fail of fully formulated crankcase lubricants as in the case of the CRC L-38-559 (Federal Test Method 3405) technique. Engine and bench test data are compared to illustrate the capabilities of this new bench technique.
Technical Paper

A Bench Test Facility for Engine Muffler Evaluation

1963-01-01
630283
The problem associated with laboratory evaluation of muffler acoustical characteristics are complicated both by the acoustical considerations involved in obtaining an adequate noise source and by the ambiguities involved in defining what constitutes quality in a muffler built for general application. In order to quantitatively define the characteristics of quality mufflers, an extensive series of field tests were conducted on a variety of sizes and types of mufflers in conjunction with four engine configurations. Work then turned to the development of a wide band siren noise source and acoustical test system which would simulate the high impedance character of an engine exhaust noise source, and in addition generate the necessary intensity and spectral characteristics required to obtain test data over the range of noise conditions encountered in the field.
Journal Article

A Continuous Discharge Ignition System for EGR Limit Extension in SI Engines

2011-04-12
2011-01-0661
A novel continuous inductive discharge ignition system has been developed that allows for variable duration ignition events in SI engines. The system uses a dual-coil design, where two coils are connected by a diode, combined with the multi-striking coil concept, to generate a continuous current flow through the spark plug. The current level and duration can be regulated by controlling the number of re-strikes that each coil performs or the energy density the primary coils are charged to. Compared to other extended duration systems, this system allows for fairly high current levels during the entire discharge event while avoiding the extremely high discharge levels associated with other, shorter duration, high energy ignition systems (e.g. the plasma jet [ 1 , 2 ], railplug [ 3 ] or laser ignition systems [ 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 ].
Technical Paper

A High-Energy Continuous Discharge Ignition System for Dilute Engine Applications

2013-04-08
2013-01-1628
SwRI has developed the DCO® ignition system, a unique continuous discharge system that allows for variable duration/energy events in SI engines. The system uses two coils connected by a diode and a multi-striking controller to generate a continuous current flow through the spark plug of variable duration. A previous publication demonstrated the ability of the DCO system to improve EGR tolerance using low energy coils. In this publication, the work is extended to high current (≻ 300 mA/high energy (≻ 200 mJ) coils and compared to several advanced ignition systems. The results from a 4-cylinder, MPI application demonstrate that the higher current/higher energy coils offer an improvement over the lower energy coils. The engine was tested at a variety of speed and load conditions operating at stoichiometric air-fuel ratios with gasoline and EGR dilution.
Technical Paper

A Laboratory-Scale Test to Predict Intake Valve Deposits

1997-10-01
972838
The performance of modern spark ignition engines with electronically controlled fuel injection systems may be adversely affected by formation of deposits around the intake valve. The rate of deposit formation is sensitive to fuel composition and boiling point distribution, as well as engine design and operating conditions. Deposit control additives are available, and full-scale engine and vehicle tests have been developed to rate fuel deposition characteristics. However, the expense associated with full-scale testing, combined with the many variables affecting repeatability, create a need for a well controlled laboratory-scale bench test. This paper describes the development of both the test apparatus and methodology to accurately reproduce the conditions present at the intake valve of an operating engine. Procedures were developed to simulate both a “keep clean” sequence, with neat or additized fuel, and also a “clean-up” sequence, using fuel that contains a deposit control additive.
Technical Paper

A New Engine Test for the Development of Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Oils for Engines with Exhaust Gas Recirculation: The Mack T-10 Test

2000-06-19
2000-01-1985
More stringent emission legislation has been a driver for changes in the design of Heavy Duty Diesel engines since the 1980s. Optimization of the combustion processes has lead to significant reductions of exhaust emission levels over the years. However, in the year 2002, diesel engines in the USA will have to meet an even more stringent set of emission requirements. Expectations are that this will force most engine builders to incorporate Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR). Several studies of the impact of EGR on lubricant degradation have shown increased levels of contamination with soot particles and acidic components. Both of these could lead to changes in lubricant requirements. The industry is developing a new specification for diesel engine lubricants, PC-9, using test procedures incorporating engines with EGR.
Technical Paper

A Next-Generation Emission Test Procedure for Small Utility Engines - Part 1, Background and Approach

1990-09-01
901595
Measurement of emissions from small utility engines has usually been accomplished using steady-state raw emissions procedures such as SAE Recommended Practice J1088. While raw exhaust measurements have the advantage of producing modal exhaust gas concentration data for design feedback; they are laborious, may influence both engine performance and the emissions themselves, and have no provision for concurrent particulate measurements. It is time to consider a full-dilution procedure similar in principle to automotive and heavy-duty on-highway emission measurement practice, leading to improvements in many of the areas noted above, and generally to much higher confidence in data obtained. When certification and audit of small engine emissions become a reality, a brief dilute exhaust procedure generating only the necessary data will be a tremendous advantage to both manufacturers and regulatory agencies.
Technical Paper

A Study of Engine Sensitivity to Spark Plug Rim-Fire

1998-05-04
981453
A recent study of engine sensitivity revealed that spark plugs used in conventional spark-ignited gasoline-fueled engines do not always fire in the intended fashion. Rather than firing to the ground strap during each ignition event, the arc frequently travels to the “rim” or “shell” of the spark plug. This behavior is termed rim-fire and although observed by other researchers in industry, its effects on engine performance are not widely reported. This paper addresses some of the quantitative effects of rim-fire on engine performance. Combustion data were recorded for various repeat conditions on a Ford 1.8L Zetec engine. The first set of engine tests used four, new, conventional, automotive spark plugs. The second set of engine tests used four modified spark plugs that induced 100% rim-fire when the ground strap was permanently removed. The study focused on part- and full-load engine performance, EGR tolerance, and step-transient characteristics.
Technical Paper

A Test Method for Evaluating Feasibility of Lean Nitrous Oxide Traps

2011-01-19
2011-26-0030
The Lean NOx Trap (LNT) is a technology that could be used to reduce oxides of nitrogen from heavy-duty diesel engines to meet emissions standards (US 2010 and EURO 4/5/6). This paper describes a case-study for evaluating the feasibility of an LNT. LNTs suffer from sulfur poisoning and thermal aging limitations. Catalyst formulations allow reversal of sulfur poisoning through desulfation procedures. A case study was performed using a 7-liter diesel engine equipped with VGT, common rail fuel injection system, cooled EGR, oxidation catalyst and DPF. The LNT was positioned after the particulate filter. Gaseous raw emissions were measured from engine and various stages of aftertreatment. A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analyzer was used to characterize Ammonia and SO₂. Temperatures were measured in the substrate. Fast response NOx sensor allowed for continuous monitoring of the NOx in the LNT. A wide-range O₂ sensor was also utilized to measure equivalence ratio.
Journal Article

Advanced Ignition Systems Evaluations for High-Dilution SI Engines

2014-10-13
2014-01-2625
A series of ignition systems were evaluated for their suitability for high-EGR SI engine applications. Testing was performed in a constant-volume combustion chamber and in a single-cylinder research engine, with EGR rates of up to 40% evaluated. All of the evaluated systems were able to initiate combustion at a simulated 20% EGR level, but not all of the resulting combustion rates were adequate for stable engine operation. High energy spark discharge systems were better, and could ignite a flame at up to 40% simulated EGR, though again the combustion rates were slow relative to that required for stable engine performance. The most effective systems for stable combustion at high EGR rates were systems which created a large effective flame kernel and/or a long kernel lifetime, such as a torch-style prechamber spark plug or a corona discharge igniter.
Technical Paper

Advanced Nondestructive Testing Methods for Bearing Inspection

1972-02-01
720172
The principles of the magnetic-perturbation method of flaw detection and the Barkhausen noise residual stress measurement method are briefly reviewed. It is suggested that they provide very powerful tools for assuring improved ball bearing performance. The methods are applied for the evaluation of ball bearing races. Typical experimental results are presented along with metallurgical sectioning correlation.
Technical Paper

Advanced Performance of Metallic Converter Systems Demonstrated on a Production V8 Engine

2002-03-04
2002-01-0347
It has been shown within the catalyst industry that the emission performance with higher cell density technology and therefore with higher specific geometric area is improved. The focus of this study was to compare the overall performance of high cell density catalysts, up to 1600cpsi, using a MY 2001 production vehicle with a 4.7ltr.V8 engine. The substrates were configured to be on the edge of the design capability. The goal was to develop cost optimized systems with similar emission and back pressure performance, which meet physical and production requirements. This paper will present the results of a preliminary computer simulation study and the final emission testing of a production vehicle. For the pre-evaluation a numerical simulation model was used to compare the light-off performance of different substrate designs in the cold start portion of the FTP test cycle.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of Sample Bag Hydrocarbon Emissions and Carbon Dioxide Permeation Properties

2004-03-08
2004-01-0593
The equipment for collecting dilute exhaust samples involves the use of bag materials (i.e., Tedlar®) that emit hydrocarbons that contaminate samples. This study identifies a list of materials and treatments to produce bags that reduce contamination. Based on the average emission rates, baked Tedlar®, Capran® treated with alumina deposition, supercritical CO2 extracted Kynar® and supercritical CO2 extracted Teflon NXT are capable of achieving the target hydrocarbon emission rate of less than 15 ppbC per 30 minutes. CO2 permeation tests were also performed. Tedlar, Capran, Kynar and Teflon NXT showed comparable average permeation rates. Based on the criteria of HC emission performance, changes in measured CO2 concentration, ease of sealing, and ease of surface treatment, none of the four materials could be distinguished from one another.
Technical Paper

Application of On-Highway Emissions Technology to a Backhoe

1992-04-01
920922
Recent legislation, including the California Clean Air Act of 1988 and the Federal Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990, includes off-road engines, equipment, and vehicles as targets for new exhaust emissions regulations. The Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District in cooperation with EXXON USA is conducting a major Low NOx Demonstration Program including mobile sources, construction equipment, and offshore equipment. As a part of this program, an existing backhoe has been retrofitted with a low NOx engine and demonstrated in the field. This paper discusses the work performed to allow Case model 580 backhoes to be retrofitted with Cummins 4BTAA3.9 on-highway turbocharged diesel engines. A standard production conversion kit can be used to mount the new engines in place of the older existing JI Case engines in some models while other newer models already have 4B3.9 engines. In addition, an air-to-air aftercooler and associated plumbing was designed and installed.
Technical Paper

Catalytic Converter Thermal Environment Measurement Under Dynamometer Simulated Roadloads

2000-03-06
2000-01-0216
An increasing number of passenger vehicle exhaust systems incorporate catalytic converters that are “close-coupled” to the exhaust manifold to further reduce the quantity of cold-start emissions and increase overall catalyst conversion efficiencies. In general, close-coupled catalytic converters are not necessarily subjected to higher inlet exhaust temperatures than conventional underbody catalytic converters. To establish a foundation of on-vehicle temperature data, several passenger vehicles with close-coupled catalytic converters were studied while operating on a chassis dynamometer. Converter temperatures were measured over a variety of vehicle test conditions, including accelerations and extended steady-state speeds for several throttle positions, at both zero- and four-percent simulated road grades.
Technical Paper

Catalytic Converter Vibration Measurement Under Dynamometer Simulated Roadloads

2000-03-06
2000-01-0029
In order to further reduce vehicle cold-start emissions, the use of catalytic converters that are “close-coupled” to the exhaust manifold is increasing. To understand the vibrational environment of close-coupled and underbody converters, a laboratory study was conducted on several passenger vehicles. Catalytic converter vibration spectra were measured on a chassis dynamometer with the vehicle operating over a variety of test conditions. Vehicle operating conditions included hard accelerations and extended steady-state speeds at distinct throttle positions over zero-percent and four-percent simulated road grades.
Technical Paper

Cold-Start Hydrocarbon Collection for Advanced Exhaust Emission Control

1992-02-01
920847
This paper describes the findings of a laboratory effort to demonstrate improved automotive exhaust emission control with a cold-start hydrocarbon collection system. The emission control strategy developed in this study incorporated a zeolite molecular sieve in the exhaust system to collect cold-start hydrocarbons for subsequent release to an active catalytic converter. A prototype emission control system was designed and tested on a gasoline-fueled vehicle. Continuous raw exhaust emission measurements upstream and downstream of the zeolite molecular sieve revealed collection, storage, and release of cold-start hydrocarbons. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emission results show a 35 percent reduction in hydrocarbons emitted during the cold-transient segment (Bag 1) due to adsorption by the zeolite.
Technical Paper

Combined Benefits of Variable Valve Actuation and Low-Pressure EGR on SI Engine Efficiency Part 1: Part Load

2019-04-02
2019-01-0241
Modern spark ignited engines face multiple barriers to achieving higher thermal efficiency. This study investigated the potential of utilizing both continuously variable valve actuation (VVA) and low-pressure cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to improve engine thermal efficiency at part-load conditions. Six speed / load points were investigated on a 1.6 L turbocharged gasoline direct injection engine. A design of experiment (DoE) approach using the Box-Behnken surface response model was conducted. The DoE results revealed different brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) responses to the valve phasing and the intake valve lift at different operating conditions. Further engine testing was carried out at each speed / load point to confirm the engine efficiency and combustion performance when targeting different valvetrain controls and EGR strategies. The results indicated that utilizing the VVA system could always reduce BSFC at the studied operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Combined Benefits of Variable Valve Actuation and Low-Pressure EGR on SI Engine Efficiency Part 2: High Load

2019-04-02
2019-01-0237
The abnormal autoignition of the unburned gas, namely knock, at high loads is a major challenge for modern spark ignited engines. Knock prevents the application of high compression ratios due to the increased unburned gas temperature, and it becomes increasingly severe for downsized engines with high specific powers. The current paper reports on the potential of utilizing continuously variable valve actuation (VVA) and low-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to reduce knock tendency at high loads. Five speed / load points were investigated on a 1.6 L turbocharged gasoline direct injection engine. The brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) response to the valve phasing and the intake valve lift was investigated with the design of experiment (DoE) approach. The DoE was conducted using a Box-Behnken surface response model. The results exhibited insensitive response of BSFC to intake valve lift and overlap.
Journal Article

Combined Effects of Engine and Oil Age on Low Speed Pre-Ignition

2019-01-15
2019-01-0033
Low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) is a well-established phenomenon that occurs in boosted, direct injection, spark ignition engines. The impact of lubricant formulation has arguably received the most attention, leading to the introduction of the Sequence IX test for LSPI as part of the API SN PLUS lubricant service category. This test, as with most other LSPI evaluations, considers the performance of the fresh oil. A handful of papers have started addressing the effect of both engine and oil age on LSPI during both test-stand and in-vehicle studies. The current paper adds to this body of knowledge by analyzing results from multiple test-bench installations of the GM LHU engine platform. For each engine, multiple tests, each comprising of multiple segments of a high-load, low-speed test point, known to amplify the occurrence of LSPI, were analyzed to investigate the combined effect of oil and engine age on LSPI activity.
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