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Technical Paper

Development and Implementation of a Path-Following Algorithm for an Autonomous Vehicle

2007-04-16
2007-01-0815
This paper describes the development and implementation of an accurate and repeatable path-following algorithm focused ultimately on vehicle testing. A compact, lightweight, and portable hardware package allows easy installation and negligible impact on the vehicle mass, even for the smallest automobile. Innovative features include the ability to generate a smooth, evenly-spaced path vector regardless the quality of the given path. The algorithm proposed in this work is suitable for testing in a controlled environment. The system was evaluated in simulation and performed well in road tests at low speeds.
Technical Paper

Drive Scenario Generation Based on Metrics for Evaluating an Autonomous Vehicle Controller

2018-04-03
2018-01-0034
An important part of automotive driving assistance systems and autonomous vehicles is speed optimization and traffic flow adaptation. Vehicle sensors and wireless communication with surrounding vehicles and road infrastructure allow for predictive control strategies taking near-future road and traffic information into consideration to improve fuel economy. For the development of autonomous vehicle speed control algorithms, it is imperative that the controller can be evaluated under different realistic driving and traffic conditions. Evaluation in real-life traffic situations is difficult and experimental methods are necessary where similar driving conditions can be reproduced to compare different control strategies. A traditional approach for evaluating vehicle performance, for example fuel consumption, is to use predefined driving cycles including a speed profile the vehicle should follow.
Journal Article

Impact of Different Desired Velocity Profiles and Controller Gains on Convoy Driveability of Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control Operated Platoons

2017-03-28
2017-01-0111
As the development of autonomous vehicles rapidly advances, the use of convoying/platooning becomes a more widely explored technology option for saving fuel and increasing the efficiency of traffic. In cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC), the vehicles in a convoy follow each other under adaptive cruise control (ACC) that is augmented by the sharing of preceding vehicle acceleration through the vehicle to vehicle communication in a feedforward control path. In general, the desired velocity optimization for vehicles in the convoy is based on fuel economy optimization, rather than driveability. This paper is a preliminary study on the impact of the desired velocity profile on the driveability characteristics of a convoy of vehicles and the controller gain impact on the driveability. A simple low-level longitudinal model of the vehicle has been used along with a PD type cruise controller and a generic spacing policy for ACC/CACC.
Technical Paper

Localization and Perception for Control and Decision Making of a Low Speed Autonomous Shuttle in a Campus Pilot Deployment

2018-04-03
2018-01-1182
Future SAE Level 4 and Level 5 autonomous vehicles will require novel applications of localization, perception, control and artificial intelligence technology in order to offer innovative and disruptive solutions to current mobility problems. This paper concentrates on low speed autonomous shuttles that are transitioning from being tested in limited traffic, dedicated routes to being deployed as SAE Level 4 automated driving vehicles in urban environments like college campuses and outdoor shopping centers within smart cities. The Ohio State University has designated a small segment in an underserved area of campus as an initial autonomous vehicle (AV) pilot test route for the deployment of low speed autonomous shuttles. This paper presents initial results of ongoing work on developing solutions to the localization and perception challenges of this planned pilot deployment.
Journal Article

Ohio State University Experiences at the DARPA Challenges

2008-10-07
2008-01-2718
The Ohio State University has fielded teams at all three of the DARPA Grand Challenge and DARPA Urban Challenge autonomous vehicle competitions, using three very different vehicle platforms. In this paper we present our experiences in these competitions, comparing and contrasting the different requirements, strategies, tasks, and vehicles developed for each challenge. We will discuss vehicle control and actuation, sensors, sensor interpretation, planning, behavior, and control generation. We will also discuss lessons learned from the engineering and implementation process for these three vehicles.
Technical Paper

Use of Robust DOB/CDOB Compensation to Improve Autonomous Vehicle Path Following Performance in the Presence of Model Uncertainty, CAN Bus Delays and External Disturbances

2018-04-03
2018-01-1086
Autonomous vehicle technology has been developing rapidly in recent years. Vehicle parametric uncertainty in the vehicle model, variable time delays in the CAN bus based sensor and actuator command interfaces, changes in vehicle sped, sensitivity to external disturbances like side wind and changes in road friction coefficient are factors that affect autonomous driving systems like they have affected ADAS and active safety systems in the past. This paper presents a robust control architecture for automated driving systems for handling the abovementioned problems. A path tracking control system is chosen as the proof-of-concept demonstration application in this paper. A disturbance observer (DOB) is embedded within the steering to path error automated driving loop to handle uncertain parameters such as vehicle mass, vehicle velocities and road friction coefficient and to reject yaw moment disturbances.
Technical Paper

Vehicle to Vehicle Interaction Maneuvers Choreographed with an Automated Test Driver

2009-04-20
2009-01-0440
Modern passenger cars are being equipped with advanced driver assistance systems such as lane departure warning, collision avoidance systems, adaptive cruise control, etc. Testing for operation and effectiveness of these warning systems involves interaction between vehicles. While dealing with multiple moving vehicles, obtaining discriminatory results is difficult due to the difficulty in minimizing variations in vehicle separation and other parameters. This paper describes test strategies involving an automated test driver interacting with another moving vehicle. The autonomous vehicle controls its state (including position and speed) with respect to the target vehicle. Choreographed maneuvers such as chasing and overtaking can be performed with high accuracy and repeatability that even professional drivers have difficulty achieving. The system is also demonstrated to be usable in crash testing.
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