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Technical Paper

A Real-Time Computer System for the Control of Refrigerant Flow

1997-02-24
970108
This paper presents a real-time computer system for the control of refrigerant flow in an automotive air conditioning system. This is an experimental system used to investigate the potential advantages of electronic flow control over conventional flow control (using an orifice tube or thermal expansion valve). Two features of this system are presented. First, the system organization is described. Second, the control and interface software are presented. The emphasis is on the software. The system is organized as a closed loop control system. The inputs to the controller are measurements of the refrigerant system. In particular, thermocouples are used to measure the refrigerant temperature before and after the evaporator. The analog thermocouple signals are converted to digital form by an off-the-shelf, portable, data acquisition system (DAQ). Via a parallel port link, these digital measurements are transfered to a laptop computer.
Technical Paper

A Transportable Instrumentation Package for In-Vehicle On-Road Data Collection for Driver Research

2013-04-08
2013-01-0202
We present research in progress to develop and implement a transportable instrumentation package (TIP) to collect driver data in a vehicle. The overall objective of the project is to investigate the symbiotic relationship between humans and their vehicles. We first describe the state-of-art technologies to build the components of TIP that meet the criteria of ease of installation, minimal interference with driving, and sufficient signals to monitor driver state and condition. This method is a viable alternative to current practice which is to first develop a fully instrumented test vehicle, often at great expense, and use it to collect data from each participant as he/she drives a prescribed route. Another practice, as for example currently being used in the SHRP-2 naturalistic driving study, is to install the appropriate instrumentation for data collection in each individual's vehicle, often requiring several hours.
Technical Paper

A Value Analysis Tool for Automotive Interior Door Trim Panel Materials and Process Selection

2007-04-16
2007-01-0453
This paper describes a computerized value analysis tool (VAT) developed to aid automotive interior designers, engineers and planners to achieve the high levels of perceived quality of materials used in automotive door trim panels. The model requires a number of inputs related to types of materials, their manufacturing processes and customer perceived quality ratings, costs and importance of materials, features located in different areas of the door trim panel, etc. It allows the user to conduct iterative evaluation of total cost, total weighted customer perceived quality ratings, and estimates of perceived value (perceived quality divided by cost) for different door trim areas as well as the entire door trim panel. The VAT, thus, allows value and cost management related to materials and processing choices for automotive interiors.
Technical Paper

An Elastoplastic Damage Coupled Analysis for Crashworthiness of Aluminum Materials

1996-02-01
960169
This paper presents a comprehensive damage model capable of predicting crash behavior of aluminum structures under varying applied loading conditions. The damage model has been implemented in a general purpose explicit nonlinear finite element code and crash analysis has been carried out for aluminum tubes. The response obtained from the finite element analysis shows a close agreement with the experimental data. The finite element program containing the proposed generalized damage model can be used to analyze aluminum structures subjected to complex service loading conditions and identify associated failure modes to assess crashworthiness.
Technical Paper

Analysis of Cumulative Damage in a Bumper Due to Multiple Low Speed Impacts

2000-03-06
2000-01-0631
The paper presents a method of analysis based on the theory of damage mechanics to quantify the degree of damage in an engineering structure under load. The method is incorporated into a Ford in-house finite element program called FCRASH that is applied to analyze the cumulative damage in a bumper under multiple low speed impacts. The numerical results calculated at the peak value of the contact force are compared with the test results. The FEA results are used to identify the locations of the hotspot in the bumper system and the predicted location where a potential crack would initiate. The microscopic observations showed damage in the area predicted with the finite element program after the specified number of impacts.
Technical Paper

Aqueous Corrosion of Experimental Creep-Resistant Magnesium Alloys

2006-04-03
2006-01-0257
This paper presents a comparison of aqueous corrosion rates in 5% NaCl solution for eight experimental creep-resistant magnesium alloys considered for automotive powertrain applications, as well as three reference alloys (pure magnesium, AM50B and AZ91D). The corrosion rates were measured using the techniques of titration, weight loss, hydrogen evolution, and DC polarization. The corrosion rates measured by these techniques are compared with each other as well as with those obtained with salt-spray testing using ASTM B117. The advantages and disadvantages of the various corrosion measurement techniques are discussed.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Driver Behavior and Performance in Two Driving Simulators

2008-04-14
2008-01-0562
This paper presents results of a study conducted to compare driving behavior and performance of drivers in two different fixed-base driving simulators (namely, FAAC and STI) while performing a same set of distracting tasks under geometrically similar freeway and traffic conditions. The FAAC simulator had a wider three-screen road view with steering feedback as compared to the STI simulator which had a single screen and narrower road view and had no steering feedback. Twenty four subjects (12 younger and 12 mature) drove each simulator and were asked to perform a set of nine different tasks involving different distracting elements such as, using a cell phone, operating the car radio, retrieving and selecting a map from map pocket in the driver's door, collecting coins to pay toll, etc.
Journal Article

Determining Perceptual Characteristics of Automotive Interior Materials

2009-04-20
2009-01-0017
This paper presents results of a three-phase research project aimed at understanding how future automotive interior materials should be selected or designed to satisfy the needs of the customers. The first project phase involved development of 22 five-point semantic differential scales to measure visual, visual-tactile, and evaluative characteristics of the materials. Some examples of the adjective pairs used to create the semantic differential scales to measure the perceptual characteristics of the material are: a) Visual: Light vs. Dark, Flat vs. Shiny, etc., b) Visual-Tactile: Smooth vs. Rough, Slippery vs. Sticky, Compressive vs. Non-Compressive, Textured vs. Non-Textured, etc., c) Evaluative (overall perception): Dislike vs. Like, Fake vs. Genuine, Cheap vs. Expensive, etc. In the second phase, 12 younger and 12 older drivers were asked to evaluate a number of different automotive interior materials by using the 22 semantic differential scales.
Technical Paper

Development of Specifications for the UM-D's Low Mass Vehicle for China, India and the United States

2005-04-11
2005-01-1027
This paper presents results of a research project conducted to develop a methodology and to refine the specifications of a small, low mass, low cost vehicle being developed at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. The challenge was to assure that the design would meet the needs and expectations of customers in three different countries, namely, China, India and the United States. U.S, Chinese and Indian students studying on the university campus represented customers from their respective countries for our surveys and provided us with the necessary data on: 1) Importance of various vehicle level attributes to the entry level small car customer, 2) Preferences to various features, and 3) Direction magnitude estimation on parameters to size the vehicle for each of the three markets.
Technical Paper

Development of a Parametric Model for Advanced Vehicle Design

2004-03-08
2004-01-0381
This paper describes a research project currently in-progress to develop a parametric model of a vehicle for use in early design stages of a new vehicle program. The model requires key input parameters to define the kind of new vehicle to be designed — in terms of details such as its intended driver/user population, vehicle type (e.g. 2-box, 3-box designs), and some key exterior and interior dimensions related to its size and proportions. The model computes and graphically displays interior package, ergonomics zones for driver controls and displays, and field of views through window openings. It also allows importing or inputting and superimposing and manipulating exterior surfaces created by a designer to assess compatibility between the interior occupant package and the vehicle exterior.
Technical Paper

Driver Workload in an Autonomous Vehicle

2019-04-02
2019-01-0872
As intelligent automated vehicle technologies evolve, there is a greater need to understand and define the role of the human user, whether completely hands-off (L5) or partly hands-on. At all levels of automation, the human occupant may feel anxious or ill-at-ease. This may reflect as higher stress/workload. The study in this paper further refines how perceived workload may be determined based on occupant physiological measures. Because of great variation in individual personalities, age, driving experiences, gender, etc., a generic model applicable to all could not be developed. Rather, individual workload models that used physiological and vehicle measures were developed.
Journal Article

Effect of Temperature Variation on Stresses in Adhesive Joints between Magnesium and Steel

2012-04-16
2012-01-0771
This study considers the thermal stresses in single lap adhesive joints between magnesium and steel. The source of thermal stresses is the large difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion of magnesium and steel. Two different temperature differentials from the ambient conditions (23°C) were considered, namely -30°C and +50°C. Thermal stresses were determined using finite element analysis. In addition to Mg-steel substrate combination, Mg-Mg and steel-steel combinations were also studied. Combined effect of temperature variation and applied load was also explored. It was observed that temperature increase or decrease can cause significant thermal stresses in the adhesive layer and thermal stress distribution in the adhesive layer depends on the substrate combination and the applied load.
Technical Paper

Graduate Education in Manufacturing Engineering for the Automotive Industry of the Future

1999-05-10
1999-01-1638
This paper discusses the evolution of graduate education in manufacturing engineering and the curriculum needed to educate manufacturing engineers in the automotive industry. This paper examines the master's and doctoral curriculum in manufacturing engineering at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Finally, it proposes future direction for graduate education in manufacturing that will be needed for the automotive industry of the future.
Technical Paper

How the University of Michigan-Dearborn Prepares Engineering Graduates for Careers in Automotive Systems Engineering

2010-10-19
2010-01-2327
The automotive industry is expected to accelerate the transition to revolutionary products, rapid changes in technology and increasing technological sophistication. This will require engineers to advance their knowledge, connect and integrate different areas of knowledge and be skilled in synthesis. In addition, they must learn to work in cross-disciplinary teams and adopt a systems approach. The College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) at the University of Michigan-Dearborn (UM-Dearborn) responded by creating interdisciplinary MS and Ph.D. programs in automotive systems engineering (ASE) and augmenting them with hands-on research. Students at the undergraduate level can also engage in numerous ASE activities. UM-Dearborn's ASE programs offer interesting and possibly unique advantages. The first is that it offers a spectrum of ASE degree and credit programs, from the MS to the Ph.D. to continuing education.
Technical Paper

Incorporating Hard Disks in Vehicles- Usages and Challenges

2006-04-03
2006-01-0814
With recent advances in microprocessors and data storage technologies, vehicle users can now bring or access large amounts of data in vehicles for purposes such as communication (e.g. e-mail, phone books), entertainment (e.g. music and video files), browsing and searching for information (e.g. on-board computers and internet). The challenge for the vehicle designer is how to design data displays and retrieval methods to allow data search and manipulation tasks by managing driver workload at safe acceptable levels. This paper presents a data retrieval menu system developed to assess levels of screens (depth of menu) that may be needed to select required information when a vehicle is equipped with the capability to access audio files, cell phone, PDA, e-mail and “On-star” type functions.
Technical Paper

Independent Control of All-Wheel-Drive Torque Distribution

2004-05-04
2004-01-2052
The sophistication of all-wheel-drive technology is approaching the point where the drive torque to each wheel can be independently controlled. This potentially offers vehicle handling enhancements similar to those provided by Dynamic Stability Control, but without the inevitable reduction in vehicle acceleration. Independent control of all-wheel-drive torque distribution would therefore be especially beneficial under acceleration close to the limit of stability. A vehicle model of a typical sports sedan was developed in Simulink, with fully independent control of torque distribution. Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to determine which torque distribution parameters have the greatest impact on the vehicle course and acceleration. A proportional-integral control strategy was implemented, applying yaw rate feedback to vary the front-rear torque distribution, and lateral acceleration feedback to adjust the left-right distribution.
Technical Paper

Insightful Representations of Roll Plane Model Stability Limits

2006-04-03
2006-01-1284
Yaw and roll stability limits are derived for three quasi-static roll plane models: rigid vehicle, suspended vehicle, and compliant tire vehicle. A generalized stability equation is identified that fits the stability limits for each model. This generalized stability equation leads to the definition of two new parameters referred to as the generalized superelevation and generalized center of gravity height. These parameters are shown to be physically meaningful. The use of linearizing assumptions is minimized and road superelevation is included, resulting in a more complete equation for each stability limit. Each derived stability limit is then compared and contrasted to the typical representations found in the literature.
Technical Paper

LS-DYNA3D Simulation of Sheet Metal Forming using Damage Based User Subroutine

2001-03-05
2001-01-1129
LS-DYNA3D has been widely used to perform computer simulation of sheet metal forming. In the material library of LS-DYNA3D there are a number of user defined material models. In order to take full advantage of the material subroutines, it is important for the users to be able to display user defined history variables in the post processing and to establish user-defined failure criterion. In this report, the development of a damage coupled plastic model is firstly described. The damage model is then programmed in a user defined material subroutine. This is followed by performing finite element simulation of sheet metal forming with the LS-DYNA3D that has incorporated the damage coupled plastic model. The way to display the user defined history variables and how to deal with the failure criterion during the postprocessing of ETA/DYNAFORM are described. History variable distributions at several time steps are displayed and discussed in this paper.
Journal Article

Measurement and Modeling of Perceived Gear Shift Quality for Automatic Transmission Vehicles

2014-05-09
2014-01-9125
This study was conducted to develop and validate a multidimensional measure of shift quality as perceived by drivers during kick-down shift events for automatic transmission vehicles. As part of the first study, a survey was conducted among common drivers to identify primary factors used to describe subjective gear-shifting qualities. A factor analysis on the survey data revealed four semantic subdimensions. These subdimensions include responsiveness, smoothness, unperceivable, and strength. Based on the four descriptive terms, a measure with semantic scales on each subdimension was developed and used in an experiment as the second study. Twelve participants drove and evaluated five vehicles with different gear shifting patterns. Participants were asked to make kick-down events with two different driving intentions (mild vs. sporty) across three different speeds on actual roadway (local streets and highway).
Technical Paper

Mechanical Response of Composite Reinforced Aluminum Foam Sandwich Systems for Automotive Structures

2007-04-16
2007-01-1722
This paper presents the design and manufacture a sandwich structure bumper beam that could withstand at least the same load required to have plastic deformation in a 2002 Jeep Wrangler bumper beam at a lower weight. The dimensions from a bumper beam were scaled down in order to match the limiting length of the sandwich structure specimens. Theoretical optimization calculations were conducted in order to find the optimal dimensions and face thicknesses for the hybrid structures. Sandwich panels were based on Glass Fiber Reinforced Polypropylene (Twintex) and an Aluminum foam core (Alporas). Three point bending tests were performed on the sandwich structures. The resulting failure modes were revealed and found to be in agreement with those offered by the analytical predictions.
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