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Technical Paper

An Analysis of Regulated and Unregulated Emissions in an HSDI Diesel Engine under the LTC Regime

2007-04-16
2007-01-0905
Several mechanisms are discussed to understand the formation of both regulated and unregulated emissions in a high speed, direct injection, single cylinder diesel engine using low sulphur diesel fuel. Experiments were conducted over a wide range of injection pressures, EGR rates, injection timings and swirl ratios. The regulated emissions were measured by the standard emission equipment. Unregulated emissions such as aldehydes and ketones were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography and hydrocarbon speciation by gas chromatography. Particulate mass was measured with a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM). Analysis was made of the sources of different emission species and their relationship with the combustion process under the different operating conditions. Special attention is given to the low temperature combustion (LTC) regime which is known to reduce both NOx and soot. However the HC, CO and unregulated emissions increased at a higher rate.
Technical Paper

Comparing Cavitation in Diesel Injectors Based on Different Modeling Approaches

2004-03-08
2004-01-0027
Results of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analyses of different diesel fuel injector nozzle configurations using a commercial CFD code are presented here. The emphasis of this study is on comparing cavitation models available in the commercial code with respect to their mathematical approach. One of the models is a simple single-phase model based on the Barotropic equation of state, while the other model is a two-phase model based on the bubble dynamic considerations. Results are compared for various 3-D diesel injector nozzles using the two cavitation-modeling approaches. Simulation results are observed to substantiate some of the experimentally established facts like; nozzle efficiency improvements by using techniques like rounded orifice inlets and conical orifices. Also, simulation results agree well with the experimental results. Spray characteristics are predicted based on a primary breakup model.
Technical Paper

Effect of Cetane Number with and without Additive on Cold Startability and White Smoke Emissions in a Diesel Engine

1999-05-03
1999-01-1476
I The effect of Cetane Number (CN) of the fuel and the addition of cetane improvers on the cold starting and white smoke emissions of a diesel engine was investigated. Tests were conducted on a single-cylinder, four-stroke-cycle, air-cooled, direct-injection, stand-alone diesel engine in a cold room at ambient temperatures ranging from 25 °C to - 5 °C. Five fuels were used. The base fuel has a CN of 49.2. The CN of the base fuel was lowered to 38.7 and 30.8 by adding different amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons. Iso-octyl nitrate is added to the high aromatic fuels in order to increase their CN to 48.6 and 38.9 respectively. Comparisons are made between the five fuels to determine the effect of CN and the additive on cylinder peak pressure, heat release rate, cold start-ability, combustion instability, hydrocarbon emissions and solid and liquid particulates.
Technical Paper

Emissions Trade-Off and Combustion Characteristics of a High-Speed Direct Injection Diesel Engine

2001-03-05
2001-01-0197
The emissions trade-off and combustion characteristics of a high speed, small-bore, direct injection, single cylinder, diesel engine are investigated at three different load conditions. The experiments covered a wide range of parameters including the injection pressure, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate and swirl ratio (Sw). The effects of each parameter on the ignition delay (ID), apparent rate of energy release (ARER), NOx, Bosch smoke unit (BSU), CO and hydrocarbons are investigated. The results show that the NOx emission dropped continuously with the increase in EGR (up to 55%), but with increasing smoke emission in a classical trade-off relationship. The increase in injection pressure generally reduced smoke with NOx penalty; however, the NOx penalty decreased at higher EGR. There also appears to be an increase in the cool flame intensity at the high EGR rates. Applying swirl at high EGR rate and high injection pressure conditions further reduced smoke emissions.
Technical Paper

Investigation of Diesel Spray Primary Break-up and Development for Different Nozzle Geometries

2002-10-21
2002-01-2775
The nozzle configuration for an injector is known to have an important effect on the fuel atomization. A comprehensive experimental and numerical investigation has been performed to determine the influence of various internal geometries on the primary spray breakup and development using the electronically controlled high-pressure diesel injection systems. Different types of multi-hole minisac and VCO nozzles with cylindrical and tapered geometries, and different types of single-hole nozzles with defined grades of Hydro Grinding (HG) were investigated. The global characteristics of the spray, including spray angle, spray tip penetration and spray pattern were measured from the spray images with a high-speed drum camera. A long-distance microscope with a pulsed-laser as the optical shutter was used to magnify the diesel spray at the nozzle hole vicinity. A CFD analysis of the internal flow through various nozzle geometries has been carried out with a commercial code.
Technical Paper

Modeling Dynamic Behavior of Diesel Fuel Injection Systems

2004-03-08
2004-01-0536
Precise control of fuel delivery and injection pressure is essential in modern DI diesel engines. Electronically controlled high-pressure injection systems provide features required by modern diesel engines such as precise injection quantity, flexible injection timing, flexible rate of injection with multiple injections and high injection pressures. A comprehensive experimental and numerical investigation has been performed to determine the influence of operating parameters and critical injector design parameters on the dynamic performance of advanced high-pressure electronically controlled diesel injection systems. The injection systems compared in this study are the High Pressure Common Rail (HPCR) and the Hydraulic Electronic Unit Injector (HEUI). Experiments are carried out using a Bosch type injection-rate meter. Needle lift, injection-rate/rate shape, and injection pressure are measured.
Journal Article

Particulate Matter Characterization Studies in an HSDI Diesel Engine under Conventional and LTC Regime

2008-04-14
2008-01-1086
Several mechanisms are discussed to understand the particulate matter (PM) characterization in a high speed, direct injection, single cylinder diesel engine using low sulfur diesel fuel. This includes their formation, size distribution and number density. Experiments were conducted over a wide range of injection pressures, EGR rates, injection timings and swirl ratios, therefore covering both conventional and low temperature combustion regimes. A micro dilution tunnel was used to immediately dilute a small part of the exhaust gases by hot air. A Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was used to measure the particulate size distribution and number density. Particulate mass was measured with a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM). Analysis was made of the root cause of PM characterization and their relationship with the combustion process under different operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Port-Fuel-Injection Gasoline Engine Cold Start Fuel Calibration

2006-04-03
2006-01-1052
This paper presents a simulation model for the cold start fuel calibration (CSFC) in port-fuel-injection gasoline engines. The model is based on data that are readily available during the regular engine tests. The model has been applied to two production multipoint-port-fuel-injection spark ignition gasoline engines. The model determines the amount of fuel vaporized in the intake port at any crank angle degree, and in the cylinder on cycle-by-cycle basis, during the cold start process. The optimal CSFC can be developed from the simulation results, potentially reduce the development time and cost of testing. The model works with any combinations of fuel compoments, and at various cold start soaking temperatures. The excellent flexibility makes this model an efficient tool for CSFC.
Technical Paper

Simulation and Comparison of Autoignition of Homogeneous Fuel/Air Mixtures and Sprays in Diesel Engines

2016-04-05
2016-01-0311
All previous correlations of the ignition delay (ID) period in diesel combustion show a positive activation energy, which means that shorter ID periods are achieved at higher charge temperatures. This is not the case in the autoignition of most homogeneous hydrocarbons-air mixtures where they experience the NTC (Negative Temperature Coefficient ) regime in the intermediate temperature range, from about 800 K to 1000 K). Here, the autoignition reactions slow down and longer ID periods are experienced at higher temperatures. Accordingly the global activation energy for the autoignition reactions of homogeneous mixtures should vary from positive to negative values.
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