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Standard

AEROSPACE - DYNAMIC TEST METHOD FOR DETERMINING THE RELATIVE DEGREE OF CLEANLINESS OF THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF FILTER ELEMENTS

1996-05-01
HISTORICAL
ARP599B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes a procedure for determining the insoluble contamination level of the downstream side of filter elements. Results of this procedure represent the particulate released from the tested filter element under the prevailing conditions of the test. The results may be used for comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of various cleaning methods or the cleanliness of elements after cleaning or as received from manufacturers.
Standard

Aerospace - Dynamic Test Method for Determining the Relative Degree of Cleanliness of the Downstream Side of Filter Elements

2008-06-22
CURRENT
ARP599D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes a procedure for determining the insoluble contamination level of the downstream side of filter elements. Results of this procedure represent the particulate released from the tested filter element under the prevailing conditions of the test. The results may be used for comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of various cleaning methods or the cleanliness of elements after cleaning or as received from manufacturers.
Standard

Aerospace - Dynamic Test Method for Determining the Relative Degree of Cleanliness of the Downstream Side of Filter Elements

2002-05-21
HISTORICAL
ARP599C
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes a procedure for determining the insoluble contamination level of the downstream side of filter elements. Results of this procedure represent the particulate released from the tested filter element under the prevailing conditions of the test. The results may be used for comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of various cleaning methods or the cleanliness of elements after cleaning or as received from manufacturers.
Standard

Aerospace - Evaluation of Particulate Contamination in Hydraulic Fluid - Membrane Procedure

2001-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP4285
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) establishes a method for evaluating the particulate matter extracted from the working fluid of a hydraulic system or component using a membrane. The amount of particulate matter deposited on the membrane due to filtering a given quantity of fluid is visually compared against a standard membrane in order to provide an indication of the cleanliness level of the fluid. A particular feature of this method is the membrane preparation to achieve an even particulate distribution on the membrane suitable for other applications. Membrane evaluation using standard membranes, described in this document, is an alternative technique to counting with either an optical microscope (ARP598) or an automatic particle counter (ISO 11500). The latter particle counting procedures are considered more precise.
Standard

Procedure for the Determination of Particulate Contamination of Air in Dust Controlled Spaces by the Manual Particle Count Method

2001-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP743B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes two procedures for sampling particles in dust controlled spaces. One procedure covers airborne dust above 5 μm. The other (and newly added procedure) covers particles of 25 μm and larger that “fall out” of the environment onto surfaces. In each case the particles are sized in the longest dimension and counted. Airborne particles are reported as particles per cubic meter (cubic foot) whereas particles collected in fall out samples are reported as particles per 0.1 square meter (square foot). This document includes English units in parentheses as referenced information to the SI units where meaningful. These procedures may also be used for environmental analysis where the quality of the particles by visual or chemical analysis is intended.
Standard

Sensitization and Corrosion in Stainless Steel Filters

1995-11-01
HISTORICAL
AIR844A
This document reviews briefly the subject of woven metal screens. Conditions that can promote damaging corrosion in stainless steel filter screens are discussed and recommendations are listed for minimizing corrosion damage. This is a general document only; for specific applications it is suggested that the reader refer to the technical literature, and selected references listed below.
Standard

Sensitization and Corrosion in Stainless Steel Filters

2014-02-06
CURRENT
AIR844B
This document reviews briefly the subject of woven metal screens. Conditions that can promote damaging corrosion in stainless steel filter screens are discussed and recommendations are listed for minimizing corrosion damage. This is a general document only; for specific applications it is suggested that the reader refer to the technical literature, and selected references listed below.
Standard

THE DETERMINATION OF PARTICULATE CONTAMINATION IN LIQUIDS BY THE PARTICLE COUNT METHOD

1969-08-01
HISTORICAL
ARP598A
This method describes a procedure for the sizing and counting of particulate contamination in liquid samples by membrane filtration. The procedure will allow measurement of particulate contamination five microns or greater in size with a maximum variation of ±20% in results over an average of two runs. This procedure can be used for all samples where the membrane filter is compatible with the sample liquid and rinse liquid.
Standard

THE DETERMINATION OF PARTICULATE CONTAMINATION IN LIQUIDS BY THE PARTICLE COUNT METHOD

1986-12-01
HISTORICAL
ARP598B
This method describes a procedure for the sizing and counting of particulate contamination in liquid samples by membrane filtration. The procedure will allow measurement of particulate contamination five micrometres or greater in size with a maximum variation of ±20% in results over an average of two runs. This procedure can be used for all samples where the membrane filter is compatible with the sample liquid and rinse liquid. Section II of this procedure may be used to count any sample on a gridded membrane where particles are evenly distributed. This procedure is an alternative to counting with an automatic particle counter although results by each method from identical samples might not be equivalent due to individual idiosyncrasies in each technique.
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