Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 19 of 19
Technical Paper

A Model and the Methodology for Determining Wear Particle Generation Rate and Filter Efficiency in a Diesel Engine Using Ferrography

1982-02-01
821195
Monitoring of the wear rate of a diesel engine will yield valuable information regarding the wear mechanism within a diesel engine and ultimately will improve the predictions of failing engines and/or their components to allow preventive maintenance which will prolong the life of the engine. A mathematical model was developed that describes the wear particle concentration as a function of time in a diesel engine. This model contains engine and lubrication system parameters that determine the concentration of wear particles in the engine sump. These variables are the oil system volume, oil flow rate, particle generation rate, filtering efficiency and the initial particle concentration. The model has been employed to study the wear particle concentrations in the sump and the mass of particles in the filter for the Cummins VT-903 diesel engine.
Technical Paper

A One-Dimensional Computational Model for Studying the Filtration and Regeneration Characteristics of a Catalyzed Wall-Flow Diesel Particulate Filter

2003-03-03
2003-01-0841
A one-dimensional, two layer computational model was developed to predict the behavior of a clean and particulate-loaded catalyzed wall-flow diesel particulate filter (CPF). The model included the mechanisms of particle deposition inside the CPF porous wall and on the CPF wall surface, the exhaust flow field and temperature field inside the CPF, as well as the particulate catalytic oxidation mechanisms accounting for the catalyst-assisted particulate oxidation by the catalytic coating in addition to the conventional particulate thermal oxidation. The paper also develops the methodology for calibrating and validating the model with experimental data. Steady state loading experiments were performed to calibrate and validate the model.
Technical Paper

A Study of the Filtration and Oxidation Characteristics of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst and a Catalyzed Particulate Filter

2007-04-16
2007-01-1123
An experimental and modeling study was conducted to study the passive regeneration of a catalyzed particulate filter (CPF) by the oxidation of particulate matter (PM) via thermal and Nitrogen dioxide/temperature-assisted means. Emissions data in the exhaust of a John Deere 6.8 liter, turbocharged and after-cooled engine with a low-pressure loop EGR and a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) - catalyzed particulate filter (CPF) in the exhaust system was measured and used for this study. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the DOC, CPF and DOC+CPF configurations at various engine speeds and loads.
Technical Paper

A Study of the Regeneration Process in Diesel Particulate Traps Using a Copper Fuel Additive

1996-02-01
960136
The goals of this research are to understand the regeneration process in ceramic (Cordierite) monolith traps using a copper fuel additive and to investigate the various conditions that lead to trap regeneration failure. The copper additive lowers the trap regeneration temperature from approximately 500 °C to 375 °C and decreases the time necessary for regeneration. Because of these characteristics, it is important to understand the effect of the additive on regeneration when excessive particulate matter accumulation occurs in the trap. The effects of particulate mass loading on regeneration temperatures and regeneration time were studied for both the controlled (engine operated at full load rated speed) and uncontrolled (trap regeneration initiated at full load rated speed after which the engine was cut to idle) conditions. The trap peak temperatures were higher for the uncontrolled than the controlled regeneration.
Technical Paper

An Experimental and Computational Study of the Pressure Drop and Regeneration Characteristics of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst and a Particulate Filter

2006-04-03
2006-01-0266
An experimental and computational study was performed to evaluate the performance of the CRT™ technology with an off-highway engine with a cooled low pressure loop EGR system. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO2-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO2 upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to experimental data at temperatures from 230°C to 550°C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m3/min.
Technical Paper

An Experimental and Numerical Study of the Performance Characteristics of the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in a Continuously Regenerating Particulate Filter

2003-10-27
2003-01-3176
A one-dimensional model simulating the oxidation of CO, HC, and NO was developed to predict the gaseous emissions downstream of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). The model is based on the conservation of mass, species, and energy inside the DOC and draws on past research literature. Steady-state experiments covering a wide range of operating conditions (exhaust temperatures, flow rates and gaseous emissions) were performed, and the data were used to calibrate and validate the model. NO conversion efficiencies of 50% or higher were obtained at temperatures between 300°C and 350°C. CO conversion efficiencies of 85% or higher and HC conversion efficiencies of 75% or higher were found at every steady state condition above 200°C. The model agrees well with the experimental results at temperatures from 200°C to 500°C, and volumetric flow rates from 8 to 42 actual m3/min.
Technical Paper

Effects of Diesel Fuel Sulfur Level on Performance of a Continuously Regenerating Diesel Particulate Filter and a Catalyzed Particulate Filter

2000-06-19
2000-01-1876
This paper reports the test results from the DPF (diesel particulate filter) portion of the DECSE (Diesel Emission Control - Sulfur Effects) Phase 1 test program. The DECSE program is a joint government and industry program to study the impact of diesel fuel sulfur level on aftertreatment devices. A systematic investigation was conducted to study the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on (1) the emissions performance and (2) the regeneration behavior of a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter. The tests were conducted on a Caterpillar 3126 engine with nominal fuel sulfur levels of 3 parts per million (ppm), 30 ppm, 150 ppm and 350 ppm.
Technical Paper

Effects of a Catalyzed Particulate Filter on Emissions from a Diesel Engine: Chemical Characterization Data and Particulate Emissions Measured with Thermal Optical and Gravimetric Methods

2003-03-03
2003-01-0049
A wide range of emissions were characterized from a heavy-duty diesel engine operated on conventional low sulfur (∼375 ppm) fuel, equipped with manually controlled EGR and a catalyzed particulate filter (CPF). The effect of the CPF and engine load was studied, along with a comparison of results between the gravimetric and thermal optical methods (TOM) for determining diesel particulate levels. Data were obtained from four of the EPA old 13 mode test cycle steady-state operating conditions, i.e., Modes 11, 10, 9, and 8 using a 1995 Cummins M11-330E engine with a Corning EX-80 cordierite particulate filter, coated with a platinum catalyst (5 g/ft3).
Technical Paper

Effects of a Ceramic Particle Trap and Copper Fuel Additive on Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions

1994-10-01
942068
This research quantifies the effects of a copper fuel additive on the regulated [oxides of nitrogen (NOx), hydrocarbons (HC) and total particulate matter (TPM)] and unregulated emissions [soluble organic fraction (SOF), vapor phase organics (XOC), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, particle size distributions and mutagenic activity] from a 1988 Cummins LTA10 diesel engine using a low sulfur fuel. The engine was operated at two steady state modes (EPA modes 9 and 11, which are 75 and 25% load at rated speed, respectively) and five additive levels (0, 15, 30, 60 and 100 ppm Cu by mass) with and without a ceramic trap. Measurements of PAH and mutagenic activity were limited to the 0, 30 and 60 ppm Cu levels. Data were also collected to assess the effect of the additive on regeneration temperature and duration. Copper species collected within the trap were identified and exhaust copper concentrations quantified.
Technical Paper

Effects of an Oxidation Catalytic Converter on Regulated and Unregulated Diesel Emissions

1994-03-01
940243
In this study, the effects of an oxidation catalytic converter (OCC) on regulated and unregulated emissions from a 1991 prototype Cummins I.10-310 diesel engine fueled with a 0.01 weight percent sulfur fuel were investigated. The OCC's effects were determined by measuring and comparing selected raw exhaust emissions with and without the platinum-based OCC installed in the exhaust system, with the engine operated at three steady-state modes. It was found that the OCC had no significant effect on oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and nitric oxide (NO) at any mode, but reduced hydrocarbon (HC) emmissions by 60 to 70 percent. The OCC reduced total particulate matter (TPM) levels by 27 to 54 percent, primarily resulting from 53 to 71 percent reductions of the soluble organic fraction (SOF). The OCC increased sulfate (SO42-) levels at two of the three modes (modes 9 and 10), but the overall SO42- contribution to TPM was less than 6 percent at all modes due to the low sulfur level of the fuel.
Technical Paper

Impact of a Ceramic Trap and Manganese Fuel Additive on the Biological Activity and Chemical Composition of Exhaust Particles from Diesel Engines Used in Underground Mines

1987-09-14
871621
This study examines the effect of a ceramic particle trap and a manganese fuel additive on the mutagenic activity and chemical composition of diesel exhaust particulate matter from a heavy-duty mining engine. Particles were collected by dilution tunnel sampling from a 4-cylinder, Caterpillar 3304, naturally-aspirated, indirect-injection engine operated at six steady-state conditions. Depending on engine load and speed the ceramic particle trap reduced the following emissions: particulate matter, 80 – 94%; soluble organic fraction (SOF), 83 – 95%; 1-nitropyrene, 94 – 96%; and SOF mutagencity, 72% (cycle-weighted average). When the Mn fuel additive was used without a ceramic particle trap the total cycle mutagenic activity emitted increased 7-fold, in part, due to elevated emissions of 1-nitropyrene.
Technical Paper

Oxidation Catalytic Converter and Emulsified Fuel Effects on Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Emissions

2002-03-04
2002-01-1277
A study was conducted to assess the effects of a water-diesel fuel emulsion with and without an oxidation catalytic converter (OCC) on steady-state heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. Two OCCs with different metal loading levels were used in this study. A 1988 Cummins L10-300 heavy-duty diesel engine was operated at the rated speed of 1900 rpm and at 75% and 25% load conditions (EPA modes 9 and 11 respectively) of the 13 mode steady-state test as well as at idle. Raw exhaust emissions' measurements included total hydrocarbons (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and nitric oxide (NO). Diluted exhaust measurements included total particulate matter (TPM) and its primary constituents, the soluble organic (SOF), sulfate (SO42-) and the carbonaceous solids (SOL) fractions. Vapor phase organic compounds (XOC) were also analyzed. The SOF and XOC samples were analyzed for selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).
Technical Paper

Regulated and Unregulated Exhaust Emissions Comparison for Three Tier II Non-Road Diesel Engines Operating on Ethanol-Diesel Blends

2005-05-11
2005-01-2193
Regulated and unregulated emissions (individual hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes and ketones, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and soluble organic fraction of particulate matter) were characterized in engines utilizing duplicate ISO 8178-C1 eight-mode tests and FTP smoke tests. Certification No. 2 diesel (400 ppm sulfur) and three ethanol/diesel blends, containing 7.7 percent, 10 percent, and 15 percent ethanol, respectively, were used. The three, Tier II, off-road engines were 6.8-L, 8.1-L, and 12.5-L in displacement and each had differing fuel injection system designs. It was found that smoke and particulate matter emissions decreased with increasing ethanol content. Changes to the emissions of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen varied with engine design, with some increases and some decreases. As expected, increasing ethanol concentration led to higher emissions of acetaldehyde (increases ranging from 27 to 139 percent).
Technical Paper

The Application of Analytical Ferrography and Spectroscopy to Detect Normal and Abnormal Diesel Engine Wear

1984-10-01
841371
Analytical ferrography was used as a wear measurement tool while implimenting a procedure to calculate the wear particle generation rate and filter efficiency during laboratory diesel engine testing. The engine testing methodology with quantitative ferrography proved to be a sensitive wear measurement technique in detecting a reduction in the wear particle generation rate for a better anti-wear (API SF/CD) oil from that of a baseline API SD/CD oil. Ferrography and spectroscopy were useful as diagnostic tools for the detection and correction of the unexpected circulation of copper contaminant in the lubrication system. A journal bearing failure was detected with qualitative ferrography and verified with an engine teardown while spectroscopy did not detect the bearing failure.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Fuel and Engine Design on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions

1996-02-01
960131
The objective of this research was to obtain diesel particle size distributions from a 1988 and a 1991 diesel engine using three different fuels and two exhaust control technologies (a ceramic particle trap and an oxidation catalytic converter). The particle size distributions from both engines were used to develop models to estimate the composition of the individual size particles. Nucleation theory of the H2O and H2SO4 vapor is used to predict when nuclei-mode particles will form in the dilution tunnel. Combining the theory with the experimental data, the conditions necessary in the dilution tunnel for particle formation are predicted. The paper also contains a discussion on the differences between the 1988 and 1991 engine's particle size distributions. The results indicated that nuclei mode particles (0.0075-0.046 μm) are formed in the dilution tunnel and consist of more than 80% H2O-H2SO4 particles when using the 1988 engine and 0.29 wt% sulfur fuel.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Low Sulfur Fuel and a Ceramic Particle Filter on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions

1992-02-01
920566
Diesel exhaust particle size distributions were measured using an Electrical Aerosol Analyzer (EAA) with both conventional (0.31 wt. pet sulfur) and low sulfur fuel (0.01 wt pet sulfur) with and without a ceramic diesel particle filter (DPF). The engine used for this study was a 1988 heavy-duty diesel engine (Cummins LTA10-300) operated at EPA steady-state modes 9 and 11. The particle size distribution results indicated the typical bi-modal distribution; however, there were clear differences in the number of particles in each mode for all conditions. For the baseline conditions with no DPF, there was more than one order of magnitude greater number of particles in the nuclei mode for the conventional fuel as compared to the low sulfur fuel, while the accumulation modes for each fuel were nearly identical.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Fuel Sulfur Concentration on Regulated and Unregulated Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions

1993-03-01
930730
The effects of fuel sulfur concentration on heavy-duty diesel emissions have been studied at two EPA steady-state operating conditions, mode 9 (1900 RPM, 75% Load) and mode 11(1900 RPM, 25% Load). Data were obtained using one fuel at two sulfur levels (Low Sulfur, LS = 0.01 wt% S and Doped Low Sulfur DS = 0.29 wt% S). All tests were conducted using a Cummins LTA10-300 heavy-duty diesel engine. No significant changes were found for the nitrogen oxides (NOx), soluble organic fractions (SOF) and XAD-2 (a copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene) organic component (XOC) due to the fuel sulfur level increase at either engine mode. The hydrocarbon (HC) levels were not significantly affected by sulfur at mode 9; however, at mode 11 the HC levels were reduced by 16%. The total particulate matter (TPM) levels increased by 17% at mode 11 and by 24% at mode 9 (both significantly different).
Technical Paper

The Influence of a Ceramic Particle Trap on the Size Distribution of Diesel Particles

1985-02-01
850009
The U.S. Bureau of Mines has sponsored research Co determine the particle size distribution and concentration of submicron particles upstream and downstream of a ceramic particle trap mounted in the exhaust stream of a Caterpillar 3304 diesel engine. Particle size distribution and mass were measured with an electrical aerosol analyzer, a diffusion battery-condensation nuclei counter combination, and filters. The engine was operated at 1400 and 1800 RPM and 3 load conditions at each speed-In general, the collection efficiency of the trap was high, ranging between 89 to 96%. Size distribution analysis revealed that the trap was generally more efficient at removing particles smaller than 0.1 µm diameter than larger particles. However, under certain conditions formation of nuclei (less than 0.056 µm diameter) downstream of the trap took place.
Technical Paper

The Performance of an Electrostatic Agglomerator as a Diesel Soot Emission Control Device

1990-02-01
900330
A major problem with many soot emission control devices is the fact that they quickly become loaded with soot which must be removed by a controlled burning (regeneration) process. The need for regeneration greatly complicates such diesel particle emission control devices. In this paper, an electrostatic agglomerator (ESA) which efficiently collects diesel particles but does not require regeneration is described. The ESA is an electrostatic precipitator which is designed to collect and subsequently reentrain diesel soot particles. The collection and reentrainment processes results in growth of particle diameter from roughly 0.2 μm to larger than 1.0 μm. The agglomerated particles are large enough to be collected by a relatively simple inertial device, e.g., a cyclone separator. The collected particle may be either recycled to the engine or disposed of by other means. Electrostatic collection is made easier by the fact that diesel particles are charged by the combustion process itself.
X