Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 18 of 18
Standard

RECOMMENDED RMS TERMS AND PARAMETERS

1995-12-01
CURRENT
AIR4896
The terms used in most engineering technologies tend to be physical characteristics such as speed, rate of turn, and fuel consumption. While they may require very careful definition and control of the way in which they are measured, the terms themselves are not subject to different interpretations. Reliability, maintainability and supportability (RMS) however, use terms that are mathematically defined. As a result, there are more than 2000 terms defined in just the documents reviewed so far, many of which have multiple interpretations. This proliferation of definitions of the terms leads to problems when one attempts to compare the performance of one system to another. For example, the RMS performance of a transport aircraft from the commercial arena is measured using metrics that are not the same as those for a fighter or attack aircraft from a military service.
Standard

RMS Terms and Definitions

2005-03-06
CURRENT
ARP5638
The terms used in most engineering technologies tend to be physical characteristics such as speed, rate of turn, and fuel consumption. While they may require very careful definition and control of the way in which they are measured, the terms themselves are not subject to different interpretations. Reliability, Maintainability, and Supportability (RMS) however, use terms that are defined in a variety of ways with multiple interpretations. The variety of definitions given to a single term creates problems when trying to compare the performance of one system to another. To eliminate the confusion, a literature search that listed current and past RMS terms and definitions was conducted. The literature search included input from the US Military, UK Military, NATO, SAE, IEEE, NASA, ISO, University Research, and other publications. The object was to determine the common definition of Reliability Terms from a variety of sources.
Standard

Recommended Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Practices for Non-Automobile Applications

2001-07-01
CURRENT
ARP5580
Recommended Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Practices For Non-Automobile Applications describes the basic procedures for performing a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA). It encompasses functional, interface, and detailed FMEA, as well as certain pre-analysis activities (FMEA planning and functional requirements analysis), post-analysis activities (failure latency analysis, FMEA verification, and documentation), and applications to hardware, software, and process design. It is intended for use by organizations whose product development processes use FMEA as a tool for assessing the safety and reliability of system elements, or as part of their product improvement processes. A separate, Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice, J1739, is intended for use in automobile applications.
Standard

Software Reliability Program Implementation Guide

2004-01-29
HISTORICAL
JA1003_200401
In 1994, the SAE G-11 Reliability, Maintainability, Supportability and Logistics (RMSL) Division chartered a software committee, G-11SW, to create several software standards and guidance documents across the RMSL spectrum, including a software reliability program standard and implementation guidelines. The committee was formed as a cross section of international representatives from commercial industries and governments. The G-11SW committee has developed a standard (JA1002) and these implementation guidelines (JA1003) that are consistent with a SAE G-11 system level reliability program standard (JA1000) and guidelines (JA1000-1), augmented by necessary software-specific information. The G-11SW committee believes these documents reflect the best current commercial practices, and meet the objectives of the United States Department of Defense Acquisition Reform initiative and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Reliability Program.
Standard

Software Reliability Program Implementation Guide

2012-05-07
CURRENT
JA1003_201205
This document provides methods and techniques for implementing a reliability program throughout the full life cycle of a software product, whether the product is considered as standalone or part of a system. This document is the companion to the Software Reliability Program Standard [JA1002]. The Standard describes the requirements of a software reliability program to define, meet, and demonstrate assurance of software product reliability using a Plan-Case framework and implemented within the context of a system application. This document has general applicability to all sectors of industry and commerce and to all types of equipment whose functionality is to some degree implemented by software components. It is intended to be guidance for business purposes and should be applied when it provides a value-added basis for the business aspects of development, use, and sustainment of software whose reliability is an important performance parameter.
Standard

Software Reliability Program Standard

1998-07-01
HISTORICAL
JA1002_199807
Context-This SAE Standard provides a framework for the management of software reliability within system reliability requirements. It is based around the Software Reliability Plan and Software Reliability Case and emphasizes the importance of evaluating progress towards meeting software reliability requirements throughout the project life-cycle. Range of Application-This document can be applied to all projects that incorporate software. This includes the integration of Off the Shelf (OTS) software products and custom software. OTS software sources include commercial vendors, government, and industry (e.g., reused library software). Custom software is generally newly developed software or a significant rework/upgrade of existing software that is for use with a specific application. Roles a. The Software Reliability Plan and the Software Reliability Case are intended to serve the needs of industry organizations in meeting software product reliability objectives. b.
Standard

Software Reliability Program Standard

2004-01-28
HISTORICAL
JA1002_200401
In 1994, the SAE G-11 Reliability, Maintainability, Supportability and Logistics (RMSL) Division chartered a software committee, G-11SW, to create several software standards and guidance documents across the RMSL spectrum, including a software reliability program standard. The committee was formed as a cross section of international representatives from commercial industries and governments. The G-11SW committee has attempted to develop a standard that is consistent with a SAE G-11 system level reliability program standard and augmented by necessary software-specific support information. The G-11SW committee believes this document reflects the best current commercial practices, and meets the objectives of the United States Department of Defense Acquisition Reform initiative.
Standard

Software Reliability Program Standard

2012-05-07
CURRENT
JA1002_201205
This SAE Standard provides a framework for the management of software reliability within system reliability requirements. It is based around the Software Reliability Plan and Software Reliability Case and emphasizes the importance of evaluating progress towards meeting software reliability requirements throughout the project life-cycle.
Standard

Software Support Concept

1999-06-01
HISTORICAL
JA1006_199906
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a framework for the establishment of a software support concept related to the support and supportability of both custom-developed and Off-the-Shelf (OTS) software. This document complements SAE AIR 5121, JA1004, and JA1005 by providing information needed to understand the support aspects that should be covered by a software supportability program. It should be noted that particular information indicated here should not be considered a complete list of all aspects of the support concept. In particular, the information should not be confused with a list of data elements. This document has general applicability to all sectors of industry and commerce and to all types of equipment that contain software. The target audience for this document includes software acquisition organizations, software logisticians, developers, supporters, and customers.
Standard

Software Support Concept

2004-01-28
HISTORICAL
JA1006_200401
Historically, the supportability aspects of software have been given a very low priority in the overall program requirements. This was particularly prevalent during the acquisition phase, where funding and timing constraints were usually the top priorities. The result was inadequate product supportability, inadequate support funding, lack of good field data, and no meaningful analysis and optimization of possible support alternatives. In order to alleviate these historical concerns, this document presents a top-level structured overview of an overall software support concept and the information associated with it. This document was developed by the Supportability Subcommittee of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) G-11 Reliability, Maintainability, Supportability, and Logistics (RMSL) Software Committee (G-11SW).
Standard

Software Support Concept

2012-05-07
CURRENT
JA1006_201205
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a framework for the establishment of a software support concept related to the support and supportability of both custom-developed and Off-the-Shelf (OTS) software. This document complements SAE AIR 5121, JA1004, and JA1005 by providing information needed to understand the support aspects that should be covered by a software supportability program. It should be noted that particular information indicated here should not be considered a complete list of all aspects of the support concept. In particular, the information should not be confused with a list of data elements. This document has general applicability to all sectors of industry and commerce and to all types of equipment that contain software. The target audience for this document includes software acquisition organizations, software logisticians, developers, supporters, and customers.
Standard

Software Supportability Program Implementation Guide

2001-05-21
HISTORICAL
JA1005_200105
This SAE Recommended Practice provides recommended guidelines and best practices for implementing a supportability program to ensure that software is supportable throughout its life cycle. This Implementation Guide is the companion to the Software Supportability Program Standard, SAE JA1004, that describes, within a Plan-Case framework, what software supportability performance requirements are necessary. This document has general applicability to all sectors of industry and commerce and to all types of equipment whose functionality is to some degree implemented via software. It is intended to be guidance for business purposes and should be applied when it provides a value-added basis for the business aspects of development, use, and sustainment of support-critical software. Applicability of specific recommended practices will depend on the support-significance of the software, application domain, and life cycle stage of the software.
Standard

Software Supportability Program Implementation Guide

2012-05-07
CURRENT
JA1005_201205
This SAE Recommended Practice provides recommended guidelines and best practices for implementing a supportability program to ensure that software is supportable throughout its life cycle. This Implementation Guide is the companion to the Software Supportability Program Standard, SAE JA1004, that describes, within a Plan-Case framework, what software supportability performance requirements are necessary. This document has general applicability to all sectors of industry and commerce and to all types of equipment whose functionality is to some degree implemented via software. It is intended to be guidance for business purposes and should be applied when it provides a value-added basis for the business aspects of development, use, and sustainment of support-critical software. Applicability of specific recommended practices will depend on the support-significance of the software, application domain, and life cycle stage of the software.
Standard

Software Supportability Program Implementation Guide

2004-01-28
HISTORICAL
JA1005_200401
This document identifies recommended practices for the implementation of a supportability program for software within an overall systems engineering framework. Guidelines for implementation of a Software Supportability Plan and associated Software Supportability Case are presented. Recommended practices are described for establishing a software supportability program through selection of life cycle activity tasks tailored for the application. Recommended models and process methods to achieve the life cycle activity tasks are briefly reviewed and/or referenced. The recommended practices are applicable to all projects incorporating software. The target audience for this document includes software acquisition organizations, logisticians, developers, supporters, and customers. This document is intended to be guidance for business purposes and should be applied when it provides a value-added basis for the business aspects of development, use, and sustainment of support-critical software.
Standard

Software Supportability Program Standard

1998-07-01
HISTORICAL
JA1004_199807
This SAE Standard defines the basic structural elements, and guidance on compilation and management, for a software supportability program. Software supportability considerations include initial design influence and through-life support embracing the operational use, post-delivery modification, and logistics management of software. This document requires that the processes of design, development, selection, and production of software include software supportability considerations, as relevant to particular project needs. This document generally applies to all types of computer-based systems and throughout the project life-cycle. The developmental scope of the project and other issues as covered within the document determine how this document needs to be tailored.
Standard

Software Supportability Program Standard

2004-01-28
HISTORICAL
JA1004_200401
In 1994 the SAE G-11 Reliability, Maintainability, Supportability, and Logistics (RMSL) Division chartered a software committee, G-11SW, to create several software standards and guidance documents across the RMSL spectrum, including a software supportability program standard. The committee was formed as a cross section of international representatives from commercial industries and governments. The G-11SW committee has attempted to develop a standard that is consistent with a SAE G-11 system level supportability program standard and augmented by necessary software-specific support information. The G-11SW committee believes this document reflects the best current commercial practices, and meets the objectives of the United States Department of Defense Acquisition Reform initiative.
Standard

Software Supportability Program Standard

2012-05-07
CURRENT
JA1004_201205
This SAE Standard defines the basic structural elements, and guidance on compilation and management, for a software supportability program. Software supportability considerations include initial design influence and through-life support embracing the operational use, post-delivery modification, and logistics management of software. This document requires that the processes of design, development, selection, and production of software include software supportability considerations, as relevant to particular project needs.
Standard

THE FMECA PROCESS IN THE CONCURRENT ENGINEERING (CE) ENVIRONMENT

1993-06-14
CURRENT
AIR4845
This AIR by the G-11AT (Automation and Tools) subcommittee, examines the failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) requirements and procedures as performed on current and earlier vintage engineering programs. The subcommittee has focused on these procedures in relation to the concurrent engineering (CE) environment to determine where it may be beneficial, to both FMECA analysts and users, to automate some or all of the FMECA processes. Its purpose is to inform the reader about FMECAs and how the FMECA process could be automated in a concurrent engineering environment. There is no intent on the part of the authors that the material presented should become requirements or specifications imposed as part of any future contract. The report is structured to include the following subjects: a A FMECA overview b The current FMECA process c FMECA in the concurrent engineering environment d FMECA automation e The benefits of automation
X