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Journal Article

Impact of Viscosity Modifiers on Gear Oil Efficiency and Durability: Part II

2013-04-08
2013-01-0299
This paper outlines the second part in a series on the effect of polymeric additives commonly known as viscosity modifiers (VM) or viscosity index improvers (VII) on gear oil efficiency and durability. The main role of the VM is to improve cold temperature lubrication and reduce the rate of viscosity reduction as the gear oil warms to operating temperature. However, in addition to improved operating efficiency across a broad temperature range compared to monograde fluids the VM can impart a number of other significant rheological improvements to the fluid [1]. This paper expands on the first paper in the series [2], covering further aspects in fluid efficiency, the effect of VM chemistry on these and their relationship to differences in hypoid and spur gear rig efficiency testing. Numerous VM chemistry types are available and the VM chemistry and shear stability is key to fluid efficiency and durability.
Technical Paper

New Perspectives on Lubricant Additive Corrosion: Comparison of Methods and Metallurgy

2018-04-03
2018-01-0656
Traditional methods for monitoring corrosion processes and mechanisms in real time can be both time consuming and challenging to interpret, especially when evaluations at multiple temperatures are required. Reported at SAE world congress 2017 by this author, a new method for measuring the change in resistance of a thin copper wire was applied to provide a way to monitor the corrosion of copper in situ. In this work, a copper alloy in thin wire form has been used to compare the corrosion rates to pure copper. New insights on the kinetics and mechanisms of corrosion in the presence of lubricant additives over a range of operating temperatures using the wire resistance test will be discussed. The corrosion processes observed here are highly dependent upon temperature. Making assessments of corrosion performance through elevated temperature differentiation testing can provide less optimal corrosion protection at the actual operating temperature condition.
Journal Article

New Perspectives on the Temperature Dependence of Lubricant Additives on Copper Corrosion

2017-03-28
2017-01-0891
Modern automotive transmissions contain copper and copper alloys in the form of washers, bushings, brazes and electrical components. Corrosion that occurs with any of these components especially with electrical contacts can result in a malfunction of the vehicle control systems and loss of vehicle drivability. The compatibility of transmission lubricants with copper and copper alloys is an increasingly important consideration in the design of new additive technology. Traditional methods for monitoring corrosion processes and mechanisms in real time can be both time consuming and challenging to interpret, especially when evaluations at multiple temperatures are required. This work challenges some of the industry-held beliefs around lubricant additive corrosion processes, especially at elevated temperature (>130 °C).
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