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Technical Paper

Effect of Ethanol and n-Butanol on Standard Gasoline Regarding Laminar Burning Velocities

2010-05-05
2010-01-1452
Ethanol is frequently used as a blending component in standard gasoline, with blend rates up to 10%vol liq . n-Butanol has received recent interest as an alternative fuel instead of ethanol for use in spark ignition engines. Similar to ethanol, n-butanol can be produced via the fermentation of sugars, starches, and lignocelluloses obtained from agricultural feedstock. It is of great interest to modern engine development to understand the effect of ethanol and n-butanol as blending components on the laminar burning velocity of standard gasoline. The laminar burning velocity is one key parameter for the numerical simulation of gasoline engine combustion processes. Tested fuel components are ethanol, n-butanol, and standard marked gasoline without any oxygen content. Fuel blends consist of standard-marked gasoline containing ethanol and butanol. The maximum blend rate of oxygenates is 10%vol liq . Experiments were done at different equivalence ratios between 0.7 and 1.3.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Iso-Octane, Methanol and Ethanol Regarding Laminar Burning Velocity at Elevated Pressure and Temperature

2009-06-15
2009-01-1774
The laminar burning velocity is one key parameter for the numerical simulation of gasoline engine combustion processes. In order to understand the effect of the laminar burning velocity of different fuel components on modern engine development it is of great interest to conduct experiments under high initial pressure and temperature. Initial conditions in this publication are a pressure of p = 10bar and a temperature of T = 373K. Special focus has been laid on the common C1 and C2 alcohols, methanol and ethanol, which are frequently used for blending components in standard gasoline. The experimental setup consists of a spherical closed pressurized combustion vessel with optical access. Schlieren measurements coupled with a high speed camera are used for image acquisition to track the expanding flame front. Finally, a post processing tool is used to extrapolate the measurements to zero stretch. Experiments were done at different fuel-air ratios between Φ = 0.8 and up to Φ = 1.2.
Technical Paper

Laminar Burning Velocities of Dimethyl Ether, n-Heptane and iso-Octane at High Pressure

2009-11-02
2009-01-2656
Oxygenates, such as methanol or ethanol, are frequently used as blending components in standard gasoline. One oxygenate, dimethyl ether (DME), is also used as a fuel component in some regions of the world, for example in Asia. In addition, patent reviews show the potential of DME as a blending component in liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or mixed with propane. The laminar burning velocity is one key parameter for the numerical simulation of gasoline engine combustion processes. Therefore, it is of great interest for modern engine development to understand the effect of oxygenates on the laminar burning velocity. The experimental results have been conducted under engine-like conditions with elevated initial pressures of up to 20 bar and initial temperatures of 373 K. Experiments were done at equivalence ratios between 0.8 and 1.3. The experimental setup consists of a spherical closed pressurized combustion vessel with optical access.
Technical Paper

Numerical Investigation of Laminar Burning Velocities of High Octane Fuel Blends Containing Ethanol

2009-04-20
2009-01-0935
Recently, fuels containing ethanol have become more and more important for spark ignition engines. Fuels with up to 10 vol.-% ethanol can be used in most spark ignition engines without technical modification. These fuels have been introduced in many countries already. Alternatively, for fuels with higher amounts of ethanol so called flex fuel vehicles (FFV) exist. One of the most important quantities characterizing a fuel is the laminar burning velocity. To account for the new fuels with respect to engine design, reliable data need to be existent. Especially for engine simulations, various combustion models have been introduced which rely on the laminar burning velocity as the physical quantity describing the progress of chemical reactions, diffusion, and heat conduction. However, there is very few data available in the literature for fuels containing ethanol, especially at high pressures.
Technical Paper

Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Laminar Burning Velocities of iso-Octane, Ethanol and n-Butanol

2009-11-02
2009-01-2784
Fuels containing oxygenates have become more and more important for spark ignition engines in recent years. Oxygenates are either used as an octane booster or as a biofuel component for fulfilling legislative regulations. Ethanol has been well established for blend rates up to 10%volliq. On the other hand butanol has been introduced as an alternative biofuel component. The effect of the laminar burning velocity of different fuel components on modern engine development is investigated by conducting experiments under high initial pressure and temperature. Initial conditions in this work are a pressure of p = 10 bar and a temperature of T = 373 K. Experiments were done at different fuel - air ratios between 0.8 and 1.3. Test fuels were the pure fuel components iso-octane, ethanol and n-butanol. Different chemical kinetic mechanisms for iso-octane, ethanol and n-butanol from literature are used to calculate laminar burning velocities.
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