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Technical Paper

A Comprehensive Powertrain Model to Evaluate the Benefits of Electric Turbo Compound (ETC) in Reducing CO2 Emissions from Small Diesel Passenger Cars

2014-04-01
2014-01-1650
In the last years the automotive industry has been involved in the development and implementation of CO2 reducing concepts such as the engines downsizing, stop/start systems as well as more costly full hybrid solutions and, more recently, waste heat recovery technologies. These latter include ThermoElectric Generator (TEG), Rankine cycle and Electric Turbo Compound (ETC) that have been practically implemented on few heavy-duty application but have not been proved yet as effective and affordable solutions for the automotive industry. The paper deals with the analysis of opportunities and challenges of the Electric Turbo Compound for automotive light-duty engines. In the ETC concept the turbine-compressor shaft is connected to an electric machine, which can work either as generator or motor. In the former case the power can satisfy the vehicle electrical demand to drive the auxiliaries or stored in the batteries.
Technical Paper

A Mean Value Model of the Exhaust System with SCR for an Automotive Diesel Engine

2009-09-13
2009-24-0131
Nowadays requirements towards a reduction in fuel consumption and pollutant emissions of Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) keep on pushing manufacturers to improve engines performance through the enhancement of existing subsystems (e.g.: electronic fuel injection, air systems) and the introduction of specific devices (e.g.: exhaust gas recirculation systems, SCR, …). Modern systems require a combined design and application of different after-treatment devices. Mathematical models are useful tools to investigate the complexity of different system layouts, to design and to validate (HIL/SIL testing) control strategies for the after-treatment management. This study presents a mean value model of an exhaust system with SCR; it has been coupled with a common rail diesel engine combustion black box model (Neural Network based). So, dedicated models for exhaust pipes, oxidation catalyst, diesel particulate filter and selective catalytic converter are developed.
Technical Paper

A Methodology to Enhance Design and On-Board Application of Neural Network Models for Virtual Sensing of Nox Emissions in Automotive Diesel Engines

2013-09-08
2013-24-0138
The paper describes suited methodologies for developing Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN) aimed at estimating NOx emissions at the exhaust of automotive Diesel engines. The proposed methodologies particularly aim at meeting the conflicting needs of feasible on-board implementation of advanced virtual sensors, such as neural network, and satisfactory prediction accuracy. Suited identification procedures and experimental tests were developed to improve RNN precision and generalization in predicting engine NOx emissions during transient operation. NOx measurements were accomplished by a fast response analyzer on a production automotive Diesel engine at the test bench. Proper post-processing of available experiments was performed to provide the identification procedure with the most exhaustive information content. The comparison between experimental results and predicted NOx values on several engine transients, exhibits high level of accuracy.
Technical Paper

A detailed Mean Value Model of the exhaust system of an automotive Diesel engine

2008-01-09
2008-28-0027
Theoretical models are useful tools in the design of engine control systems, with applications that range from the design of engine layout, the definition of optimised management systems, to hardware-in-the-loop testing (HiL) and to model-based control strategies. To define theoretical models for control-oriented applications, an original library has been built up at the University of Parma for the simulation of the intake and exhaust systems of automotive turbocharged engines. Starting from this library, a Mean Value Model (MVM) of a Diesel engine, with variable-geometry turbocharger (VGT), EGR and throttle valve, has been developed for a small automotive application. In the paper the matching of the engine model with a detailed model of the exhaust system (developed by Magneti Marelli Powertrain) is presented.
Technical Paper

A thermodynamic Mean Value Model of the intake and exhaust system of a turbocharged engine for HiL/SiL applications.

2009-09-13
2009-24-0121
Regarding automotive applications, Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) have become very complex plants to comply with present and future requirements in reduction of fuel consumption, pollutant emissions and performance improvement. As a consequence, the development of engine control and diagnostic system is a key aspect in the powertrain design. Mathematical models are useful tools in this direction, with applications that range from the definition of optimised management systems, to Hardware- and Software-in-the-Loop testing (HiL and SiL) and to modelbased control strategies. To this extent an original library has been developed by the authors for the simulation of last generation automotive engines. Library blocks were used to assembly a sub-model of the typical intake and exhaust system of a turbocharged engine (with VGT, intercooler, EGR circuit with cooler and throttle).
Journal Article

Acoustic Emission Processing for Turbocharged GDI Engine Control Applications

2015-04-14
2015-01-1622
In the field of passenger car engines, recent research advances have proven the effectiveness of downsized, turbocharged and direct injection concepts, applied to gasoline combustion systems, to reduce the overall fuel consumption while respecting particularly stringent exhaust emissions limits. Knock and turbocharger control are two of the most critical factors that influence the achievement of maximum efficiency and satisfactory drivability, for this new generation of engines. The sound emitted from an engine encloses many information related to its operating condition. In particular, the turbocharger whistle and the knock clink are unmistakable sounds. This paper presents the development of real-time control functions, based on direct measurement of the engine acoustic emission, captured by an innovative and low cost acoustic sensor, implemented on a platform suitable for on-board application.
Technical Paper

Air-Fuel Ratio and Trapped Mass Estimation in Diesel Engines Using In-Cylinder Pressure

2017-03-28
2017-01-0593
The development of more affordable sensors together with the enhancement of computation features in current Engine Management Systems (EMS), makes the in-cylinder pressure sensing a suitable methodology for the on-board engine control and diagnosis. Since the 1960’s the in-cylinder pressure signal was employed to investigate the combustion process of the internal combustion engines for research purposes. Currently, the sensors cost reduction in addition to the need to comply with the strict emissions legislation has promoted a large-scale diffusion on production engines equipment. The in-cylinder pressure signal offers the opportunity to estimate with high dynamic response almost all the variables of interest for an effective engine combustion control even in case of non-conventional combustion processes (e.g. PCCI, HCCI, LTC).
Technical Paper

An Integrated Simulation Methodology of Thermal Management Systems for the CO2 Reduction after Engine Cold Start

2015-04-14
2015-01-0343
The emissions limits of CO2 for vehicles are becoming more stringent with the aim of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. The New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) is adopted to measure emissions for all new internal combustion engines in the European Union, and it is performed on cold vehicle, starting at a temperature of 22°C ± 2°C. Consequently, the cold-start efficiency of internal combustion engine is becoming of predominant interest. Since at cold start the lubricant oil viscosity is higher than at the target operating temperature, the consequently higher energy losses due to increased frictions can substantially affect the emission cycle results in terms of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. A suitable thermal management system, such as an exhaust-to-oil heat exchanger, could help to raise the oil temperature more quickly.
Technical Paper

Application of Acoustic and Vibration-Based Knock Detection Techniques to a High Speed Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-0786
Knock control systems based on engine block vibrations analysis are widely adopted in passenger car engines, but such approach shows its main limits at high engine speeds, since knock intensity measurement becomes less reliable due to the increased background mechanical noise. For small two wheelers engines, knock has not been historically considered a crucial issue, mainly due to small-sized combustion chambers and mixture enrichment. Due to more stringent emission regulations and in search of reduced CO2 emissions, an effective on-board knock controller acquires today greater importance also for motorcycle applications, since it could protect the engine when different fuel types are used, and it could significantly reduce fuel consumption (by avoiding lambda enrichment and/or allowing higher compression ratios to be adopted). These types of engines typically work at high rotational speeds and the reduced signal to noise ratio makes knock onset difficult to identify.
Technical Paper

Artificial Intelligence Methodologies for Oxygen Virtual Sensing at Diesel Engine Intake

2012-04-16
2012-01-1153
In the last decades, worldwide automotive regulations induced the industry to dramatically increase the application of electronics in the control of the engine and of the pollutant emissions reduction systems. Besides the need of engine control, suitable fault diagnosis tools had also to be developed, in order to fulfil OBD-II and E-OBD requirements. At present, one of the problems in the development of Diesel engines is represented by the achievement of an ever more sharp control on the systems used for the pollutant emission reduction. In particular, as far as NOx gas is concerned, EGR systems are mature and widely used, but an ever higher efficiency in terms of emissions abatement, requires to determine as better as possible the actual oxygen content in the charge at the engine intake manifold, also in dynamic conditions, i.e. in transient engine operation.
Technical Paper

Assessment of Port Water Injection Strategies to Control Knock in a GDI Engine through Multi-Cycle CFD Simulations

2017-09-04
2017-24-0034
Water injection in highly boosted gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines has become an attractive area over the last few years as a way of increasing efficiency, enhancing performance and reducing emissions. The technology and its effects are not new, but current gasoline engine trends for passenger vehicles have several motivations for adopting this technology today. Water injection enables higher compression ratios, optimal spark timing and elimination of fuel enrichment at high load, and possibly replacement of EGR. Physically, water reduces charge temperature by evaporation, dilutes combustion, and varies the specific heat ratio of the working fluid, with complex effects. Several of these mutually intertwined aspects are investigated in this paper through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, focusing on a turbo-charged GDI engine with port water injection (PWI). Different strategies for water injection timing, pressure and spray targeting are investigated.
Technical Paper

Boost Pressure Control in Transient Engine Load with Turbocharger Speed Sensing

2017-09-04
2017-24-0049
The new driving cycles require a greater focus on a wider engine operative area and especially in transient conditions where a proper air path control is a challenging task for emission and drivability. In order to achieve this goal, turbocharger speed measurement can give several benefits during boost pressure transient and for over-speed prevention, allowing the adoption of a smaller turbocharger, that can further reduce turbo-lag, also enabling engine down-speeding. So far, the use of turbocharger speed sensor was considered expensive and rarely affordable in passenger car applications, while it is used on high performance engines with the aim of maximizing engine power and torque, mainly in steady state, eroding the safe-margin for turbocharger reliability. Thanks to the availability of a new cost effective turbocharger speed technology, based on acoustic sensing, turbocharger speed measurement has become affordably also for passengers car application.
Journal Article

Combustion Indexes for Innovative Combustion Control

2017-09-04
2017-24-0079
The continuous development of modern Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) management systems is mainly aimed at combustion control improvement. Nowadays, performing an efficient combustion control is crucial for drivability improvement, efficiency increase and pollutant emissions reduction. These aspects are even more crucial when innovative combustions (such as LTC or RCCI) are performed, due to the high instability and the high sensitivity with respect to the injection parameters that are associated to this kind of combustion. Aging of all the components involved in the mixture preparation and combustion processes is another aspect particularly challenging, since not all the calibrations developed in the setup phase of a combustion control system may still be valid during engine life.
Technical Paper

Common Rail Multi-Jet Diesel Engine Combustion Model Development for Control Purposes

2007-04-16
2007-01-0383
Multi-jet injection strategies open significant opportunities for the combustion management of the modern diesel engine. Splitting up the injection process into 5 steps facilitates the proper design of the combustion phase in order to obtain the desired torque level, whilst attempting a reduction in emissions, particularly in terms of NOx. Complex 3-D models are needed in the design stage, where components such as the injector or combustion chamber shape have to be determined. Alternatively, zero-dimensional approaches are more useful when fast interpretation of experimental data is needed and an optimization of the combustion process should be obtained based on actual data. For example, zero-dimensional models allow a quick choice of optimum control settings for each engine operating condition, avoiding the need to test all the possible combinations of engine control parameters.
Technical Paper

Conceptual Design and Analytic Assessment of 48V Electric Hybrid Powertrain Architectures for Passenger Cars

2019-04-02
2019-01-0353
To meet the requirements in relation to pollutants, CO2-emissions, performances, comfort and costs for 2025 timeframe, many technology options for the powertrain, that plays a key role in the vehicle, are possible. Beside the central aspect of reducing standard cycle consumption levels and emissions, consumer demands are also growing with respect to comfort and functionality. In addition, there is also the challenge of finding cost efficient ways of integrating technologies into a broad range of vehicles with different levels of hybridization. High degrees of electrification simultaneously provide opportunities to reduce the technology content of the internal combustion engines (ICE), resulting in a cost balancing compromise between combustion engine and hybrid technology. The design and optimization of powertrain topologies, functionalities, and components require a complex development process.
Technical Paper

Control Oriented Modeling of SCR Systems for Automotive Application

2017-09-04
2017-24-0121
In the last decades, NOx emissions legislations for Diesel engines are becoming more stringent than ever before and the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is considered as the most suitable technology to comply with the upcoming constraints. Model-based control strategies are promising to meet the dual objective of maximizing NOx reduction and minimizing NH3 slip in urea-selective catalytic reduction. In this paper, a control oriented model of a Cu-zeolite urea-SCR system for automotive diesel engines is presented. The model is derived from a quasi-dimensional four-state model of the urea-SCR plant. To make it suitable for the real-time urea-SCR management, a reduced order one-state model has been developed, with the aim of capturing the essential behavior of the system with a low computational burden. Particularly, the model allows estimating the NH3 slip that is fundamental not only to minimize urea consumption but also to reduce this unregulated emission.
Technical Paper

Development and Experimental Validation of a Control Oriented Model of SCR for Automotive Application

2018-04-03
2018-01-1263
1 The Selective Catalytic reduction (SCR) using urea as reducing agent is currently regarded as the most promising after-treatment technology in order to comply with strict RDE targets for NOX and particulate in Diesel application. Model-based control strategies are promising to satisfy the demands of high NOX conversion efficiency and low tailpipe ammonia slip. This paper deals with the development of a control oriented model of a Cu-zeolite urea-SCR system for automotive Diesel engines. The model is intended to be used for the real-time urea-SCR management, depending on engine NOX emissions and ammonia storage. In order to ensure suitable computational demand for the on-board implementation, a reduced order one-state model of ammonia storage has been derived from a quasi-dimensional four-state model of the urea-SCR plant.
Technical Paper

Development and Software in the Loop Validation of a Model-based Water Injection Combustion Controller for a GDI TC Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-1174
Turbocharged (TC) engines work at high Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP), resulting in high in-cylinder pressures and temperatures, improving thermal efficiency, but at the same time increasing the possibility of abnormal combustion events like knock and pre-ignition. To mitigate knocking conditions, engine control systems typically apply spark retard and/or mixture enrichment, which decrease indicated work and increase specific fuel consumption. Many recent studies have advocated Water Injection (WI) as an approach to replace or supplement existing knock mitigation techniques. Water reduces temperatures in the end gas zone due to its high latent heat of vaporization. Furthermore, water vapor acts as diluent in the combustion process. In this paper, the development of a novel closed-loop, model-based WI controller is discussed and critically analyzed.
Technical Paper

Development and Validation of a Methodology for Real-Time Evaluation of Cylinder by Cylinder Torque Production Non-Uniformities

2011-09-11
2011-24-0145
Modern internal combustion engine control systems require on-board evaluation of a large number of quantities, in order to perform an efficient combustion control. The importance of optimal combustion control is mainly related to the requests for pollutant emissions reduction, but it is also crucial for noise, vibrations and harshness reduction. Engine system aging can cause significant differences between each cylinder combustion process and, consequently, an increase in vibrations and pollutant emissions. Another aspect worth mentioning is that newly developed low temperature combustion strategies (such as HCCI combustion) deliver the advantage of low engine-out NOx emissions, however, they show a high cylinder-to-cylinder variation. For these reasons, non uniformity in torque produced by the cylinders in an internal combustion engine is a very important parameter to be evaluated on board.
Technical Paper

Development of a Novel Approach for Non-Intrusive Closed-Loop Heat Release Estimation in Diesel Engines

2013-04-08
2013-01-0314
Over the past years, policies affecting pollutant emissions control for Diesel engines have become more and more restrictive. In order to meet such requirements, innovative combustion control methods have currently become a key factor. Several studies demonstrate that the desired pollutant emission reduction can be achieved through a closed-loop combustion control based on in-cylinder pressure processing. Nevertheless, despite the fact that cylinder pressure sensors for on-board application have been recently developed, large scale deployment of such systems is currently hindered by unsatisfactory long term reliability and high costs. Whereas both the accuracy and the reliability of pressure measurement could be improved in future years, pressure sensors would still be a considerable part of the cost of the entire engine management system.
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