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400 Hz CONNECTION AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES

1994-12-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4365
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) describes field-level procedures to determine if 400 Hz electrical connections for external power may have been subjected to excessive wear, which may result in inadequate disengagement forces.
Standard

400 Hz Connection Aircraft Electrical Maintenance Procedures

2008-03-28
HISTORICAL
AIR4365A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) describes field-level procedures to determine if 400 Hz electrical connections for external power may have been subjected to excessive wear, which may result in inadequate disengagement forces.
Standard

400-CYCLE GROUND POWER UNIT PROVISIONS FOR AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM PROTECTION

2002-12-16
CURRENT
ARP760
This SAE Recommended Practice which defines the terms and tabulates the limits of the characteristics for various protective devices used in conjunction with 400-cycle ground power for civil aircraft is intended to assist the airlines in standardizing on 400-cycle protective systems. The limits found to be acceptable in the civil aircraft industry are presented.
Standard

8000 psi Hydraulic Systems: Experience and Test Results

1994-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4002
Shortly after World War II, as aircraft became more sophisticated and power-assist, flight-control functions became a requirement, hydraulic system operating pressures rose from the 1000 psi level to the 3000 psi level found on most aircraft today. Since then, 4000 psi systems have been developed for the U.S. Air Force XB-70 and B-1 bombers and a number of European aircraft including the tornado multirole combat aircraft and the Concorde supersonic transport. The V-22 Osprey incorporates a 5000 psi hydraulic system. The power levels of military aircraft hydraulic systems have continued to rise. This is primarily due to higher aerodynamic loading, combined with the increased hydraulic functions and operations of each new aircraft. At the same time, aircraft structures and wings have been getting smaller and thinner as mission requirements expand. Thus, internal physical space available for plumbing and components continues to decrease.
Standard

8000 psi Hydraulic Systems: Experience and Test Results

2012-11-15
CURRENT
AIR4002A
Shortly after World War II, as aircraft became more sophisticated and power-assist, flight-control functions became a requirement, hydraulic system operating pressures rose from the 1000 psi level to the 3000 psi level found on most aircraft today. Since then, 4000 psi systems have been developed for the U.S. Air Force XB-70 and B-1 bombers and a number of European aircraft including the tornado multirole combat aircraft and the Concorde supersonic transport. The V-22 Osprey incorporates a 5000 psi hydraulic system. The power levels of military aircraft hydraulic systems have continued to rise. This is primarily due to higher aerodynamic loading, combined with the increased hydraulic functions and operations of each new aircraft. At the same time, aircraft structures and wings have been getting smaller and thinner as mission requirements expand. Thus, internal physical space available for plumbing and components continues to decrease.
Standard

A GUIDE TO AIRCRAFT TURBINE ENGINE VIBRATION MONITORING SYSTEMS

1992-03-10
HISTORICAL
AIR1839A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne vibration monitoring (AVM) systems with an emphasis on system hardware design considerations. It describes AVM systems currently in use. The purpose of this AIR is to provide information and guidance for the selection, installation, and use of AVM systems and their elements. This AIR is not intended as a legal document but only as a technical guide.
Standard

A GUIDE TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A GROUND STATION FOR ENGINE CONDITION MONITORING

1994-02-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4175
An effective ground station is vital to the successful implementation of an EMS and is a fundamental part of the total monitoring system design. Unlike on-board processing systems which principally use data to indicate when engine maintenance is required, ground stations offer much greater processing power to analyse and manipulate EMS data more comprehensively for both maintenance and logistics purposes. This document reviews the main EMS functions and discusses the operating requirements which will determine the basic design of a ground station, including the interfaces with other maintenance or logistics systems. A brief discussion is also included on some of the more recent advances in EMS ground station technology which have been specifically developed to provide more effective diagnostic capabilities for gas turbine engines. Finally, this document addresses the program management requirements associated with the initial development and on-going support of a ground station.
Standard

A Guide for Application of Rf Photonics to Aerospace Platforms

2014-11-05
WIP
AIR5601A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is devoted to the challenges of applying optics to new advanced RF analog systems only; digital data link applications are covered elsewhere in protocol/architecture specific documents like Fibre Channel, ATM, Ethernet, Sonet, etc.
Standard

A Guide to APU Health Management

2018-04-09
CURRENT
AIR5317A
AIR5317 establishes the foundation for developing a successful APU health management capability for any commercial or military operator, flying fixed wing aircraft or rotorcraft. This AIR provides guidance for demonstrating business value through improved dispatch reliability, fewer service interruptions, and lower maintenance costs and for satisfying Extended Operations (ETOPS) availability and compliance requirements.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Power Train Monitoring

2017-07-19
CURRENT
AIR4174A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which aircraft propulsion energy in a turbine or reciprocating engine is converted via a gear train to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers aircraft engine driven transmission and gearbox components, their interfaces, drivetrain shafting, drive shaft hanger bearings, and associated rotating accessories, propellers, and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. For guidance on monitoring additional engine components not addressed, herein (e.g., main shaft bearings and compressor/turbine rotors), refer to ARP1839.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2001-07-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1839B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

1992-02-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1839
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2008-02-16
HISTORICAL
AIR1839C
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2017-01-04
CURRENT
AIR1839D
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2015-12-20
CURRENT
ARP1839
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174. This ARP also contains the essential elements of AS8054 which remain relevant and which have not been incorporated into Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) specifications.
Standard

A Guide to Landing Gear System Integration

2005-12-14
HISTORICAL
AIR5451
The landing gear system is a major airframe system that needs to be integrated very efficiently to minimize the penalties of weight, cost, dispatch reliability and maintenance. As the landing gear system business develops and large scale teaming arrangements and acquisitions become increasingly common, it may be desirable in some instances to procure an Integrated Landing Gear System. This document provides guidelines and useful references for developing an integrated landing gear system for an aircraft and is divided into four sections: Landing Gear Configuration Requirements (Section 3) Landing Gear Functional Requirements (Section 4) Landing Gear System Integrity Requirements (Section 5) Landing Gear Program Requirements (Section 6) The landing gear system encompasses all landing gear structural and subsystem elements. Structural elements include shock struts, braces, fittings, pins, wheels, tires and brakes.
Standard

A Guide to Landing Gear System Integration

2017-07-12
CURRENT
AIR5451A
The landing gear system is a major and safety critical airframe system that needs to be integrated efficiently to meet the overall aircraft program goals of minimizing the penalties of weight, cost, dispatch reliability and maintenance. As the landing gear system business develops and large-scale teaming arrangements and acquisitions become increasingly common, it may be desirable in some instances to procure an Integrated Landing Gear System. This document provides guidelines and useful references for developing an integrated landing gear system for an aircraft. The document structure is divided into four sections: Landing Gear System Configuration Requirements (Section 3) Landing Gear System Functional Requirements (Section 4) Landing Gear System Integrity Requirements (Section 5) Landing Gear System Program Requirements (Section 6) The landing gear system encompasses all landing gear structural and subsystem elements.
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