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Standard

Aerospace Fuel System Specifications and Standards

1986-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1408A
This report lists documents that aid and govern the design of gas turbine powered aircraft and missile fuel systems. The report lists the military and industry specifications and standards and the most notable design handbooks that are commonly used in fuel system design. The specifications and standards section has been divided into two parts, a master list arranged numerically of all industry and military specifications and standards and a component list that provides a functional breakdown and a cross-reference of these documents. It is intended that this report be a supplement to specifications MIL-F-8615, MIL-F-17874, MIL-F-38363 and MIL-F-87154. Revisions and amendments which are correct for the specifications and standards are not listed. The fuel system design handbooks are listed for fuels and for system and component design.
Standard

Considerations on Ice Formation in Aircraft Fuel Systems

2006-08-24
CURRENT
AIR790C
Ice formation in aircraft fuel systems results from the presence of dissolved and undissolved water in the fuel. Dissolved water or water in solution with hydrocarbon fuels constitutes a relatively small part of the total water potential in a particular system with the quantity dissolved being primarily dependent on the fuel temperature and the water solubility characteristics of the fuel. One condition of undissolved water is entrained water such as water particles suspended in the fuel as a result of mechanical agitation of free water or conversion of dissolved water through temperature reduction. Another condition of undissolved water is free water which may be introduced as a result of refueling or the settling of entrained water which collects at the bottom of a fuel tank in easily detectable quantities separated by a continuous interface from the fuel above. Water may also be introduced as a result of condensation from air entering a fuel tank through the vent system.
Standard

Considerations on Ice Formation in Aircraft Fuel Systems

1999-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR790B
This document suggests and summarizes points that should be considered with respect to the formation of ice in aircraft fuel systems. These summaries represent a cross-section of the opinions of fuel system designers and users.
Standard

DEFINITION OF PRESSURE SURGE TEST AND MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR RECEIVER AIRCRAFT

1983-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1665
The test procedure applies to the refueling manifold system connecting the receiver aircraft fuel tanks to the refueling source fuel pump(s) for both ground and aerial refueling. The test procedure is intended to verify that the limit value for surge pressure specified for the receiver fuel system is not exceeded when refueling from a refueling source which meets the requirements of AS 1284 (reference 2). This recommended practice is not directly applicable to surge pressure developed during operation of an aircraft fuel system, such as initiating or stopping engine fuel feed or fuel transfer within an aircraft, or the pressure surge produced when the fuel pumps are first started to fill an empty fuel manifold.
Standard

Definition of Pressure Surge Test and Measurement Methods for Receiver Aircraft

1997-12-01
CURRENT
ARP1665A
The test procedure applies to the refueling manifold system connecting the receiver aircraft fuel tanks to the refueling source fuel pump(s) for both ground and aerial refueling. The test procedure is intended to verify that the limit value for surge pressure specified for the receiver fuel system is not exceeded when refueling from a refueling source which meets the requirements of AS1284 (reference 2). This recommended practice is not directly applicable to surge pressure developed during operation of an aircraft fuel system, such as initiating or stopping engine fuel feed or fuel transfer within an aircraft, or the pressure surge produced when the fuel pumps are first started to fill an empty fuel manifold.
Standard

Electrical Bonding of Aircraft Fuel Systems

2017-10-20
WIP
AIR5128B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is limited to the subject of aircraft fuel systems and the questions concerning the requirements for electrical bonding of the various components of the system as related to Static Electric Charges, Fault Current, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and Lightning Strikes (Direct and Indirect Effects). This AIR contains engineering guidelines for the design, installation, testing (measurement) and inspection of electrical bonds.
Standard

Electrical Bonding of Aircraft Fuel Systems

2012-12-18
CURRENT
AIR5128A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is limited to the subject of aircraft fuel systems and the questions concerning the requirements for electrical bonding of the various components of the system as related to Static Electric Charges, Fault Current, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and Lightning Strikes (Direct and Indirect Effects). This AIR contains engineering guidelines for the design, installation, testing (measurement) and inspection of electrical bonds.
Standard

Engine Fuel System and Component Icing Test

2015-06-25
WIP
ARP6340
This ARP provides recommended practice on the considerations and methodology to demonstrate acceptable performance of the Engine components / fuel system, and APU, whilst operating throughout the flight cycle / engine duty for continuous operation with iced fuel and short duration operation with a snowshower resulting from release of accreted ice from fuel washed surfaces, where no anti-icing additives are present (e.g. Fuel System Icing Inhibitor FSII or alternative). Two scenarios must be considered when demonstrating the capability of Engine components / fuel system, and APU to operate with fuel borne ice to satisfy certification regulations applications in support of FAA Part 23 and Part 25, CFR Part 33, and corresponding EASA CS-E regulations, and equivalent Military application requirements.
Standard

FUEL LEVEL POINT SENSING

2015-04-21
WIP
AIR6325
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is intended to provide comprehensive reference and background information pertaining to aircraft point level sensing
Standard

Fuel System Definitions and Glossary of Terms

2015-05-20
WIP
AIR6510
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) comprises the technical terms and nomenclature, together with their definitions and abbreviations that are used in Aircraft Fuel Systems.
Standard

Fuel System Design Considerations for Composite Based Fuel Components

2018-11-19
WIP
AIR7493
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a compilation of engineering design guidelines and reference data useful to ensure composite materials used in fuel system components are compatible with an aircraft fuel system. This AIR is not a complete design manual, but offers insight into key aspects of composition design that must be adequately researched and verified before being used in a fuel system.
Standard

Fuel Thermal Management Systems

2016-04-21
WIP
AIR6380
Overview of thermal management system Key requirements and design considerations for thermal management system Lessons learned
Standard

Glossary of Terms - Aircraft Ground Refueling

2015-09-23
WIP
AIR4783A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents a glossary of terms commonly utilized in the ground delivery of fuel to an aircraft and some terms relating to the aircraft being refueled. The purpose of this document is to provide background material for educational purposes to persons designing, building, and using aircraft ground refueling delivery systems.
Standard

Optical equipment safety in fuel tanks

2018-11-15
WIP
ARP7977
This project aims to develop a framework of requirements which support safe installation and operation of optical devices within an aircraft fuel tank, specifically: 1: To determine optical power and energy limits which ensure safe operation of optical installations within an aircraft fuel tank over aircraft life and under all phases of flight, taking the limits provided in IEC 60079-28:20015 as a starting point. 2: To demonstrate optical and electrical power and energy equivalences, where possible. 3: To determine requirements for optical installations, including bonding and electrostatic discharge for non-conductive components such as optical fibres. 4: To provide guidelines for analysis of the hazards presented by the typical internal components of optical devices, such as failure modes of photo diodes and cells.
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