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Technical Paper

A Category II Avionics System

1967-02-01
670254
The electronics package for a Category II qualified business jet aircraft and the function of the various components of the system are described. These components include: dual Collins 51-RV-l VOR/ILS/G. S. receivers which provide and utilize beams along which the aircraft descends for a safe approach; a Collins AL-101 radio altimeter to determine altitude; dual flight directors for automatic and manual approaches; and a Collins 54W-1 comparator warning system, to name a few. A general rather than a technical approach is used.
Technical Paper

AIR 1873–A Guide to Limited Engine Monitoring System for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

1984-10-01
841460
AIR 1873 is being issued by the SAE E-32 committee on Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Monitoring. It provides guidance on the specification, application and use of a Limited Engine Monitoring System which is defined as an EMS where the measurement parameters are ussually limited to those that are provided as part of the standard aircraft instrumentation.
Standard

AIR DATA COMPUTER

1965-02-01
HISTORICAL
AS417
This Aerospace Standard covers an air data computer characterized by the concept of transducing and computing the majority of air data requirements for an aircraft. The display instruments and other using subsystems are not considered in this scope except where they perform computing operations for output parameters as covered by this specification. The computer may accept the inputs and provide the outputs listed in paragraphs 2.1 and 2.2 respectively. The computer may also provide an altitude encoder output for IFF Mark X ¯ ¯ (SIF)/Air Traffic Control Radar Beacon System SIF/ATCRBS; in which case AS 855* "Altitude Device Providing Outputs for Automatic Pressure Altitude Reporting" shall be referred to for applicable minimum standards. (Note - Reference to air data computer in subsequent paragraphs will be designated as "instrument".)
Standard

AIRBORNE WAKE VORTEX SAFETY SYSTEMS

2013-03-26
WIP
ARP6267
This document recommends criteria for Airborne Wake Vortex Information Systems, including operational objectives, characteristics, and functional requirements. The recommendations in this document apply to transport aircraft, and describe the operational objectives of wake vortex information systems, situational displays, guidance systems, and avoidance/detection systems.
Standard

AIRSPEED INDICATOR (PITOT STATIC)

1949-02-01
HISTORICAL
AS391A
This specification covers six types of instruments as follows: TYPE I - 30 - 250 miles per hour range TYPE II - 40 - 300 miles per hour range TYPE III - 50 - 400 miles per hour range TYPE IV - 50 - 450 miles per hour range TYPE V - 50 - 700 miles per hour range TYPE VI - 50 - 425 knots range
Standard

AIRSPEED INDICATOR (PITOT STATIC)

1954-12-01
HISTORICAL
AS391B
This Aeronautical Standard covers five basic types of airspeed instruments with indication range essentially as follows: TYPE I - 1 revolution TYPE II - 1 revolution (unequal scale) TYPE III - 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 revolutions TYPE IV - 7 revolutions TYPE V - 1-3/4 to 2 revolutions
Standard

AIRSPEED TUBES ELECTRICALLY HEATED

1960-07-15
HISTORICAL
AS393A
This aeronautical standard covers two basic types of instruments as follows: Type I - Pitot Pressure, straight and L-shaped, 12 and 14 volt nominal, 2 wire circuit. Type II - Pitot and Static Pressured, straight and L-shaped, 12 and 24 volt nominal, 2 wire circuit.
Standard

AIRSTREAM DEVIATION INSTRUMENT (ADI)

1968-12-15
HISTORICAL
ARP794
This recommended practice covers an instrument which measures and displays angle of deviation of the airstream dependent on mounting location on the aircraft.
Standard

ALTIMETER, PRESSURE ACTUATED SENSITIVE TYPE

1951-03-15
HISTORICAL
AS392B
This Aeronautical Standard covers two basic types of instruments as follows: Type I - Range 35,000 feet. Barometric Pressure. Scale range at least 28.1 - 30.99 inches of mercury (946 - 1049 millibars). May include markers working in conjunction with the Barometric Pressure Scale to indicate pressure-altitude. Type II - Range 50,000 feet. Barometric Pressure. Scale range at least 28.1 - 30.99 inches of mercury (946 - 1049 millibars). May include markers working in conjunction with the Barometric Pressure Scale to indicate pressure-altitude.
Standard

ALTIMETER, PRESSURE ACTUATED SENSITIVE TYPE

1959-02-01
CURRENT
AS392C
This Aeronautical Standard covers two (2) basic types of instruments as follows: TYPE I - Range 35,000 feet. Barometric Pressure. Scale range at least 28.1 - 30.99 inches of mercury (946-1049 millibars). May include markers working in conjunction with the Barometric Pressure Scale to indicate pressure altitude. TYPE II- Range 50,000 feet. Barometric Pressure. Scale range at least 28.1 - 30.99 inches of mercury (946-1049 millibars). May include markers working in conjunction with the Barometric Pressure Scale to indicate pressure altitude.
Standard

ALTITUDE ALERTING DEVICES AND SYSTEMS

1971-11-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1061
This ARP provides performance criteria for Altitude Alerting Devices and Systems. These devices can be self-contained or receive remote altitude information and can have integral or remote barometric corrections. Only the generation of the alerting signals is covered by this recommended practice and not the details of the visual or audio alerts operated by these signals. It is recommended that the system's operational correspondence between the selected altitude settings of the Altitude Alerting Device and the Altitude Level Indication normally used to control the aircraft should not exceed ±250 ft RSS throughout the operating range of the device.
Training / Education

ARP4761 and the Safety Assessment Process for Civil Airborne Systems

2019-10-24
ARP4761 describes guidelines and methods for performing safety assessments. This recommended practice is associated with showing compliance with certification requirements (14CFR/CS Parts 23 and 25, section 1309) and assisting a company in meeting their own internal safety standards. The safety processes described are primarily associated with civil airborne equipment but the processes and tools may be applied to many applications.
Standard

AUTOMATIC BRAKING SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS

1988-06-02
HISTORICAL
ARP1907
This ARP covers the functional, design, construction, and test requirements for Automatic Braking Systems. Installation information and lessons learned are also included.
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