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Technical Paper

A Review of CI Engine In-Cylinder Diagnostics for the Investigation of Soot Loading, Chemical Composition, and Temperature

1988-02-01
880515
Because of the more hostile environment in the compression ignition engine compared to the spark ignition engine, development and application of CI engine in-cylinder diagnostic methods have lagged those for SI engines. However, with more stringent federally mandated particulate and NOx standards which will go into effect in 1991 and 1994, the need for detailed information on the combustion processes in the cylinder is vital to controlling tailpipe emissions. The present paper contains a summary of the state-of-the-art techniques for determining in-situ species concentrations and profiles; particle concentrations, profiles, and size distributions; and temperature fields. Optical and physical probing methods, total cylinder dumping methods, and optical diagnostics applied for use in CI engine combustion chambers are discussed.
Technical Paper

A Turbocharged Spark Ignition Engine with Low Exhaust Emissions and Improved Fuel Economy

1973-02-01
730633
Turbocharging, in addition to increasing an engine's power output, can be effectively used to maintain exhaust emission levels while improving fuel economy. This paper presents the emission and performance results obtained from a turbocharged multicylinder spark ignition engine with thermal reactors and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) operated at steady-state, part-load conditions for four engine speeds. When comparing a turbocharged engine to a larger displacement naturally aspirated engine of equal power output, the emissions expressed in grams per mile were relatively unchanged both with and without EGR. However, turbocharging provided an average of 20% improvement in fuel economy both with and without EGR. When comparing the turbocharged and nonturbocharged versions of the same engine without EGR at a given load and speed, turbocharging increased the hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and decreased oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions.
Book

Emission Control and Fuel Economy for Port and Direct Injected SI Engines

2005-06-27
Emission and fuel economy regulations and standards are compelling manufacturers to build ultra-low emission vehicles. As a result, engineers must develop spark-ignition engines with integrated emission control systems that use reformulated low-sulfur fuel. Emission Control and Fuel Economy for Port and Direct Injected SI Engines is a collection of SAE technical papers that covers the fundamentals of gasoline direct injection (DI) engine emissions and fuel economy, design variable effects on HC emissions, and advanced emission control technology and modeling approaches. All papers contained in this book were selected by an accomplished expert as the best in the field; reprinted in their entirety, they present a pathway to integrated emission control systems that meet 2004-2009 EPA standards for light-duty vehicles.
Technical Paper

Further Studies with a Hydrogen Engine

1978-02-01
780233
This paper describes the performance and emissions of a hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited engine. An electronic control device, designed to provide the engine with a timed injection of the fuel, is shown to give high mean effective pressures and high efficiencies. The oxides of nitrogen from the exhaust gases have been analyzed and the mechanism for their formation is reviewed. The paper further describes an experiment with traces of hydrocarbons added to the hydrogen in an attempt to explain any additional phenomena that may be taking place during the combustion, such as “prompt NO” which is known to occur in hydrocarbon flames only. As it turns out, such additions have a negligible effect on the NOx formation in the region investigated.
Technical Paper

Influence of Fuel Additives and Dilution Conditions on the Formation and Emission of Exhaust Particulate Matter from a Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engine

2000-06-19
2000-01-2018
Experiments were performed to measure the number-weighted particle size distributions emitted from a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine. Measurements were made on a late model vehicle equipped with a direct injection spark ignition engine. The vehicle was placed on a chassis dynamometer, which was used to load the engine to road load at five different vehicle speeds ranging from 15 - 100 km/hr. Dilution of the exhaust aerosol was carried out using a two-stage dilution system in which the first stage dilution occurs as a free jet. Particle size distributions were measured using a TSI 3934 scanning mobility particle sizer. Generally speaking, the presence of the additives did not have a strong, consistent influence on the particle emissions from this engine. The polyether amine demonstrated a reduction in particle number concentration as compared to unadditized base fuel.
Technical Paper

Mobile Electric Power Technologies for the Army of the Future

1989-09-01
891876
A technology assessment of engines, power source and electrical technologies that can meets the needs of the future U.S. Army (“Army 21”) for cost-effective generator sets is made. Considered in this assessment are: diesel engines; stratified-charge, spark-ignited engines; homogeneous-charge, spark-ignited engines; gas turbine engines; and Stirling engines. Direct energy conversion devices including batteries, fuel cells, thermal-to-electric generators, and nuclear powered systems are also considered. In addition, potential advances in electric alternators and power conditioning, applications of networking, and noise reduction methods are discussed for possible application to the Army environment. Recommendations are made for the potential application of the different technologies for the needs of Army 21.
Technical Paper

Real Time Measurement of Volatile and Solid Exhaust Particles Using a Catalytic Stripper

1995-02-01
950236
A system has been developed that allows near real time measurements of total, volatile, and nonvolatile particle concentrations in engine exhaust. It consists of a short section of heated catalyst, a cooling coil, and an electrical aerosol analyzer. The performance of this catalytic stripper system has been characterized with nonvolatile (NaCl), volatile sulfate ((NH4)2 SO4), and volatile hydrocarbon (engine oil) particles with diameters ranging from 0.05-0.5 μm. The operating temperature of 300°C gives essentially complete removal of volatile sulfate and hydrocarbon particles, but also leads to removal of 15-25% of solid particles. This system has been used to determine total, volatile, and nonvolatile particle concentrations in the exhaust of a Diesel engine and a spark ignition engine. Volatile volume fractions measured in Diesel exhaust with the catalytic stripper system increased from 19-65% as the equivalence ratio (load) decreased from 0.64-0.13.
Technical Paper

Spark Ignition Engine Knock Detection Using In-Cylinder Optical Probes

1996-10-01
962103
Two types of in-cylinder optical probes were applied to a single cylinder CFR engine to detect knocking combustion. The first probe was integrated directly into the engine spark plug to monitor the radiation from burned gas in the combustion process. The second was built into a steel body and installed near the end gas region of the combustion chamber. It measured the radiant emission from the end gas in which knock originates. The measurements were centered in the near infrared region because thermal radiation from the combustion products was believed to be the main source of radiation from a spark ignition engine. As a result, ordinary photo detectors can be applied to the system to reduce its cost and complexity. It was found that the measured luminous intensity was strongly dependent upon the location of the optical sensor.
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