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Viewing 1 to 30 of 161
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0168
James W.G. Turner, James P. Lewis Monsma
Abstract Modern automotive engines almost exclusively operate on the 4-stroke Otto cycle and utilize poppet valves for gas exchange. This state of affairs has not always been the case, however, and one unusual and relatively successful technology that was once in mass production (albeit in piston aero engines) was the Burt-McCollum single sleeve valve. This paper investigates the timing and angle-area of a Bristol Centaurus engine cylinder, which utilized such a single sleeve valve for gas exchange, using some modern tools. A comparison with poppet valve angle-areas is made. Finally, the results are also used to study the potential of variable valve timing and the interaction with variable compression ratio of a single sleeve mechanism.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0172
Haijun Chen, Lin Li, Mark Schudeleit, Andreas Lange, Ferit Küçükay, Christian Stamme, Peter Eilts
Abstract In view of the rapidly increasing complexity of conventional as well as hybrid powertrains, a systematic composition platform seeking for the global optimum powertrain is presented in this paper. The platform can be mainly divided into three parts: the synthesis of the transmission, the synthesis of the internal combustion engine (ICE) and the optimization and evaluation of the entire powertrain. In regard to the synthesis of transmission concepts, a systematical and computer-aided tool suitable both for conventional und hybrid transmissions is developed. With this tool, all the potential transmission concepts, which can realize the desired driving modes or ratios, can be synthesized based on the vehicle data and requirements.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0170
Michael R. Buchman, Amos Winter
Abstract This paper evaluates the lag time in a turbocharged single cylinder engine in order to determine its viability in transient applications. The overall goal of this research is to increase the power output, reduce the fuel economy, and improve emissions of single cylinder engines through turbocharging. Due to the timing mismatch between the exhaust stroke, when the turbocharger is powered, and the intake stroke, when the engine intakes air, turbocharging is not conventionally used in commercial single cylinder engines. Our previous work has shown that it is possible to turbocharge a four stroke, single cylinder, internal combustion engine using an air capacitor, a large volume intake manifold in between the turbocharger compressor and engine intake. The air capacitor stores compressed air from the turbocharger during the exhaust stroke and delivers it during the intake stroke.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0174
Laura Tribioli, Paolo Iora, Raffaello Cozzolino, Daniele Chiappini
Abstract This paper describes the energy management controller design of a mid-sized vehicle driven by a fuel cell/battery plug-in hybrid powertrain, where an experimentally validated high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell model is used. The power management strategy results from the application of the Pontryagin's Minimum Principle, where the optimal control parameter is derived in order to minimize fuel consumption under certain constraints. In particular, the vehicle is also equipped by an autothermal reformer and, in order to minimize the hydrogen buffer size, the control algorithm is subject to constraints on the maximum hydrogen buffer level. The effectiveness of the system is analyzed when feeding the autothermal reformer with different hydrocarbon fuels and over different driving conditions. The obtained solutions are compared in terms of hydrogen consumption, fossil fuel consumption, system efficiency, money saving and equivalent CO2 emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0173
Jean-Charles Dabadie, Antonio Sciarretta, Gregory Font, Fabrice Le Berr
Abstract Due to more and more complex powertrain architectures and the necessity to optimize them on the whole driving conditions, simulation tools are becoming indisputable for car manufacturers and suppliers. Indeed, simulation is at the basis of any algorithm aimed at finding the best compromise between fuel consumption, emissions, drivability, and performance during the conception phase. For hybrid vehicles, the energy management strategy is a key driver to ensure the best fuel consumption and thus has to be optimized carefully as well. In this regard, the coupling of an offline hybrid strategy optimizer (called HOT) based on Pontryagin’s minimum principle (PMP) and an online equivalent-consumption-minimization strategy (ECMS) generator is presented. Additionally, methods to estimate the efficiency maps and other overall characteristics of the main powertrain components (thermal engine, electric motor(s), and battery) from a few design parameters are shown.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0179
Marco Tonetti, Giorgio Rustici, Massimo Buscema, Luca Ferraris
Abstract Final Euro6d emission legislation with the new homologation cycle and Real Driving Emission requirements has set a strong challenge for the ICE Passenger Car applications. Thanks to their well-known low fuel consumption characteristics, Diesel Engines can play a key role for the fulfillment of the European 2020 CO2 fleet target but need to confirm their capability to fully control noxious emissions even in extreme operating conditions, while restraining the overall engine costs and complexity. CO2 and NOx emissions reduction are considered the main drivers for diesel engine evolution. In this perspective, Exhaust Gas After-treatment and Combustion System have been identified as the two main technology aspects to be developed. The purpose of this paper is to describe the evolution paths of these two technologies and the results achieved so far in terms of noxious emissions reduction.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0178
Katarzyna E. Matusik, Daniel J. Duke, Alan L. Kastengren, Christopher F. Powell
Abstract The sparking behavior in an internal combustion engine affects the fuel efficiency, engine-out emissions, and general drivability of a vehicle. As emissions regulations become progressively stringent, combustion strategies, including exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), lean-burn, and turbocharging are receiving increasing attention as models of higher efficiency advanced combustion engines with reduced emissions levels. Because these new strategies affect the working environment of the spark plug, ongoing research strives to understand the influence of external factors on the spark ignition process. Due to the short time and length scales involved and the harsh environment, experimental quantification of the deposited energy from the sparking event is difficult to obtain. In this paper, we present the results of x-ray radiography measurements of spark ignition plasma generated by a conventional spark plug.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0159
Davide Di Battista, Marco Di Bartolomeo, Carlo Villante, Roberto Cipollone
Abstract Internal combustion engines are actually one of the most important source of pollutants and greenhouse gases emissions. In particular, on-the-road transportation sector has taken the environmental challenge of reducing greenhouse gases emissions and worldwide governments set up regulations in order to limit them and fuel consumption from vehicles. Among the several technologies under development, an ORC unit bottomed exhaust gas seems to be very promising, but it still has several complications when it is applied on board of a vehicle (weight, encumbrances, backpressure effect on the engine, safety, reliability). In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model of an ORC unit bottomed a heavy duty engine, used for commercial vehicle, has been developed.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0158
Teresa Castiglione, Giuseppe Franzè, Angelo Algieri, Pietropaolo Morrone, Sergio Bova
Abstract In this paper, we propose a novel control architecture for dealing with the requirements arising in a cooling system of an ICE. The idea is to take advantage of the joint action of an electric pump and of an ad-hoc regulation module, which is used to determine adequate flow rates despite engine speeds. Specifically, a robust Model Predictive Control approach is exploited to take care formally of input/output constraints and disturbance effects of the resulting lumped parameter model of the engine cooling system, which incorporates the nucleate boiling heat transfer regime. Numerical simulations and test rig experimental data are presented. The results achieved show that the proposed control scheme is capable of providing effective and safe cooling while mitigating disturbance effects and minimizing coolant flow rates when compared with the action pertaining to standard crankshaft driven pumps.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0161
Noboru Uchida, Hideaki Osada
Abstract To reduce heat transfer between hot gas and cavity wall, thin Zirconia (ZrO2) layer (0.5mm) on the cavity surface of a forged steel piston was firstly formed by thermal spray coating aiming higher surface temperature swing precisely synchronized with flame temperature near the wall resulting in the reduction of temperature difference. However, no apparent difference in the heat loss was analyzed. To find out the reason why the heat loss was not so improved, direct observation of flame impingement to the cavity wall was carried out with the top view visualization technique, for which one of the exhaust valves was modified to a sapphire window. Local flame behavior very close to the wall was compared by macrophotography. Numerical analysis by utilizing a three-dimensional simulation was also carried out to investigate the effect of several parameters on the heat transfer coefficient.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0160
Mario Marchetti, Riccardo Russo, Salvatore Strano, Mario Terzo
Abstract The activity described in this paper has been carried out in the framework of a funded project aimed at evaluating the feasibility of a controllable water pump based on an integrated magnetorheological fluid clutch. The advantages consist of an improvement of the overall vehicle performance and efficiency, in the possibility of disengaging the water pump when its action is not required, and in the control of the cooling fluid temperature. So, the design constraints have been defined with reference to the available space, required torque, and electrical power. After an iterative procedure, in which both mechanical design and magnetic field analyses have been considered, the most promising solution has been defined and a first physical prototype has been realized and tested. A preliminary experimental characterization of the developed prototype has been presented.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0163
Apostolos Pesiridis, Angelo Saccomanno, Raffaele Tuccillo, Alfredo Capobianco
Abstract The modern automotive industry is under strict regulations to reduce emissions to comply with the Kyoto Protocol, a universally acknowledged treaty aiming at reducing exhaust gas emissions. In order to achieve the required future emission reduction targets, further developments on gasoline engines are required. One of the main methods to achieve this goal is the application of engine downsizing. Turbocharging is a cost-effective method of downsizing an engine whilst reducing exhaust gas emissions, reducing fuel consumption and maintaining prior performance outputs. For these reasons, the turbocharging is becoming the most widely adopted technology in the automotive markets. In 2012, 32% of passenger and commercial vehicles sold had a turbocharger installed, and is predicted to be 40% of 2017 [1]. Even if the engine turbocharging is a widespread technology, there are still drawbacks present in current turbocharging systems.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0125
Angelo Algieri, Pietropaolo Morrone, Jessica Settino, Teresa Castiglione, Sergio Bova
Abstract The aim of the present work is to analyse and compare the energetic performances and the emissions conversion capability of active and passive aftertreatment systems for lean burn engines. To this purpose, a computational one-dimensional transient model has been developed and validated. The code permits to assess the heat exchange between the solid and the exhaust gas, to evaluate the conversion of the main engine pollutants, and to estimate the energy effectiveness. The response of the systems to variations in engine operating conditions have been investigated considering standard emission test cycles. The analysis highlighted that the active flow control tends to increase the thermal inertia of the apparatus and then it appears more suitable to maintain higher temperature level and to guarantee higher pollutants conversion at low engine loads after long full load operation.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0124
Michael Maurer, Peter Holler, Stefan Zarl, Thomas Fortner, Helmut Eichlseder
Abstract To minimize nitrogen oxide (NOx) as well as carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions to fulfil the new European real driving emissions (RDE) legislation, the LNT operation strategy - especially for DeNOx events (rich mode) - has to be optimized. On one hand the DeNOx purges should be long enough to fully regenerate the lean NOx trap, on the other hand the purges should be as short as possible to reduce the fuel consumption penalty from rich mode. Fundamental experiments have been conducted on a synthetic-gas-test-bench, purposely designed to test LNT catalysts. This methodology allowed to remove NOx from the gasfeed after the lean storage phase. The actually reduced amount of NOx could be easily calculated from the NOx storage before a regeneration event minus the NOx that was desorbed during the DeNOx event and afterwards thermally desorbed NOx.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0123
Christopher Eck, Futoshi Nakano
Abstract Small commercial vehicles (SCV) with Diesel engines require efficient exhaust aftertreatment systems to reduce the emissions while keeping the fuel consumption and total operating cost as low as possible. To meet current emission legislations in all cases, a DOC and DPF and some NOx treatment device (e,g. lean NOx trap or SCR) are required. Creating a cost-effective SCV also requires keeping the cost for the exhaust aftertreatment system as low as possible because the contribution to total vehicle cost is high. By using more sophisticated and more robust operating strategies and control algorithms, the hardware cost can be reduced. To keep the calibration effort at a low level, it is necessary to apply only algorithms which have a time-efficient calibration procedure. This paper will focus on the active regeneration of the DPF. For safe and efficient DPF regeneration, a very reliable and stable DOC out temperature control is required.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0129
Vladimir Merzlikin, Svetlana Parshina, Victoria Garnova, Andrey Bystrov, Alexander Makarov, Sergey Khudyakov
Abstract Running efficiency of LHR diesel has been confirmed by mean of well-known types of heat-insulating (HICs) or thermal barrier (TBCs) coatings. These materials are considered as a semitransparent media SHICs (STBCs) in the form of an ensemble of diffraction objects, forming own thermoradiative fields under the scattering theory laws. This problem is relevant for a diesel with combustion chamber (CC) in which intensive IR radiation reaches ~50% of total thermal flux. The authors indicate that predetermined selection of optical and thermoradiative parameters in the same spectrum for coatings (due to specific structural composition and porosity) can change their temperature fields inside its subsurface zone and hence in the CC gas volume. Previous author's research of optical parameters for ceramic semitransparent materials allowed offering SHIC (STBC) samples for rig testings.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0130
Antonio Paolo Carlucci, Marco Benegiamo, Sergio Camporeale, Daniela Ingrosso
Abstract 1 Nowadays, In-Cylinder Pressure Sensors (ICPS) have become a mainstream technology that promises to change the way the engine control is performed. Among all the possible applications, the prediction of raw (engine-out) NOX emissions would allow to eliminate the NOX sensor currently used to manage the after-treatment systems. In the current study, a semi-physical model already existing in literature for the prediction of engine-out nitric oxide emissions based on in-cylinder pressure measurement has been improved; in particular, the main focus has been to improve nitric oxide prediction accuracy when injection timing is varied. The main modification introduced in the model lies in taking into account the turbulence induced by fuel spray and enhanced by in-cylinder bulk motion.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0127
Lauretta Rubino, Dominic Thier, Torsten Schumann, Stefan Guettler, Gerald Russ
Abstract With the increased use of engines utilizing direct fuel injection and the upcoming introduction of more stringent emissions legislation that regulates not only particulate mass (PM) but also particulate number (PN), the emissions from Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines (DISI) are an increasing concern. Gasoline Particle Filters (GPF) represent a potential way to reduce particle number emissions from DISI engines and are particularly effective considering the tough performance requirements during cold start and over RDE operation. Even though some learning from the development and application of particulate filters to diesel engines can be transferred to gasoline engines, the particle composition, mass to number ratio as well as the exhaust gas temperature and composition from gasoline engines are significantly different to diesel engines. Therefore, there is the need to study the application of particulate filters to gasoline engines in more depth.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0128
Lauretta Rubino, Jan Piotr Oles, Antonino La Rocca
Abstract Environmental authorities such as EPA, VCA have enforced stringent emissions legislation governing air pollutants released into the atmosphere. Of particular interest is the challenge introduced by the limit on particulate number (PN) counting (#/km) and real driving emissions (RDE) testing; with new emissions legislation being shortly introduced for the gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines, gasoline particulate filters (GPF) are considered the most immediate solution. While engine calibration and testing over the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Cycle (WLTC) allow for the limits to be met, real driving emission and cold start constitute a real challenge. The present work focuses on an experimental durability study on road under real world driving conditions. Two sets of experiments were carried out. The first study analyzed a gasoline particulate filter (GPF) (2.4 liter, diameter 5.2” round) installed in the underfloor (UF) position and driven up to 200k km.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0116
Ekarong Sukjit, Pansa Liplap, Somkiat Maithomklang, Weerachai Arjharn
Abstract In this study, two oxygenated fuels consisting of butanol and diethyl ether (DEE), both possess same number of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atom but difference functional group, were blended with the waste plastic pyrolysis oil to use in a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine without any engine modification. In addition, the effect of castor oil addition to such fuel blends was also investigated. Four tested fuels with same oxygen content were prepared for engine test, comprising DEE16 (84% waste plastic oil blended with 16% DEE), BU16 (84% waste plastic oil blended with 16% butanol), DEE11.5BIO5 (83.5% waste plastic oil blended with 11.5% DEE and 5% castor oil) and BU11.5BIO5 (83.5% waste plastic oil blended with 11.5% butanol and 5% castor oil). The results found that the DEE addition to waste plastic oil increased more HC and smoke emissions than the butanol addition at low engine operating condition.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0117
Fabio Scala, Enzo Galloni, Gustavo Fontana
Abstract In this paper, the behavior of a downsized spark-ignition engine firing with alcohol/gasoline blends has been analyzed. In particular, different butanol-gasoline and ethanol-gasoline blends have been examined. All the alcohol fuels here considered are derived from biomasses. In the paper, a numerical approach has been followed. A one dimensional model has been tuned in order to simulate the engine operation when it is fueled by alcohol/gasoline mixtures. Numerous operating points, characterized by two different engine speeds and several low-medium load values, have been analyzed. The objective of the numerical analysis is determining the optimum spark advance for different alcohol percentages in the mixtures at the different engine operating points. Once the best spark timing has been selected, the differences, in terms of both indicated torque and efficiency, arising in the different kinds of fueling have been evaluated.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0114
Michel Cuijpers, Michael Golombok, Hylke Van Avendonk, Michael Boot
Abstract Recently introduced sulfur caps on marine fuels in so-called sulfur emission control areas (SECAs) are forcing shipping companies to sail on more or less automotive grade diesel in lieu of the considerably less expensive, but sulfur-laden heavy fuel oil (HFO) to which they were accustomed. This development is an opportunity for a bio-based substitute, given that most biomass is sulfur free by default. Moreover, given that biomass is typically solid to start with, cracking it to an HFO grade, which is highly viscous in nature, will involve fewer and/or less harsh process steps than would be the case if an automotive grade fuel were to be targeted. In this study, a renewable low sulfur heavy fuel oil (LSHFO) has been produced by means of subcritical water assisted lignin depolymerization in the presence of a short length surfactant, ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EGBE).
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0115
Martin Pechout, Jan Czerwinski, Martin Güdel, Michal Vojtisek-Lom
Abstract In this study, the combustion of butanol, neat and mixed with gasoline, was investigated on a 0.6 liter two-cylinder spark ignition engine with fully adjustable fuel injection and spark timing, coupled with an eddy current dynamometer. Two isomers of butanol, n-butanol and iso-butanol, were examined. This basic parameter study gives information about potential requirements of engine control systems for butanol FFV. Compared to the traditionally used ethanol, butanol does not exhibit hygroscopic behaviour, is chemically less aggressive and has higher energy density. On other hand, different laminar burning velocity and higher boiling temperature of butanol, compared to gasoline, requires some countermeasures to keep the engine operation reliable and efficient.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0120
Matthew Keenan
Abstract The earliest public domain reference regarding full engine testing of an automotive catalyst was from January 1959, written by GM and presented at the annual SAE meeting in Detroit. This current publication will review the first public domain paper referencing different aftertreatment technologies (such as TWC, LNT, DPF and SCR, but not limited to these technologies) and compare the technologies to the current state of the art in aftertreatment technology. This historical review using a range of databases, will show how exhaust aftertreatment technologies have significantly enhanced emissions control over the last 60 years for both gasoline and diesel applications. A timeline will be given showing when various technologies were first presented into the public domain. This will indicate how long it has taken certain emissions control technologies to enter the market.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0121
Ivan Arsie, Giuseppe Cialeo, Federica D'Aniello, Cesare Pianese, Matteo De Cesare, Luigi Paiano
Abstract In the last decades, NOx emissions legislations for Diesel engines are becoming more stringent than ever before and the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is considered as the most suitable technology to comply with the upcoming constraints. Model-based control strategies are promising to meet the dual objective of maximizing NOx reduction and minimizing NH3 slip in urea-selective catalytic reduction. In this paper, a control oriented model of a Cu-zeolite urea-SCR system for automotive diesel engines is presented. The model is derived from a quasi-dimensional four-state model of the urea-SCR plant. To make it suitable for the real-time urea-SCR management, a reduced order one-state model has been developed, with the aim of capturing the essential behavior of the system with a low computational burden. Particularly, the model allows estimating the NH3 slip that is fundamental not only to minimize urea consumption but also to reduce this unregulated emission.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0118
Marius Zubel, Stefan Pischinger, Benedikt Heuser
Abstract Within the Cluster of Excellence “Tailor-Made Fuels from Biomass” (TMFB) at the RWTH Aachen University, two novel biogenic fuels, namely 1-octanol and its isomer dibutyl ether (DBE), were identified and extensively analyzed in respect of their suitability for combustion in a Diesel engine. Both biofuels feature very different properties, especially regarding their ignitability. In previous works of the research cluster, promising synthesis routes with excellent yields for both fuels were found, using lignocellulosic biomass as source material. Both fuels were investigated as pure components in optical and thermodynamic single cylinder engines (SCE). For 1-octanol at lower part load, almost no soot emission could be measured, while with DBE the soot emissions were only about a quarter of that with conventional Diesel fuel. At high part load (2400 min-1, 14.8 bar IMEP), the soot reduction of 1-octanol was more than 50% and for DBE more than 80 % respectively.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0119
Jos Feijen, Gerard Klink, Ed Jong, Andreas Schmid, Niels Deen, Michael Boot
Abstract Second generation biomass is an attractive renewable feedstock for transport fuels. Its sulfur content is generally negligible and the carbon cycle is reduced from millions to tens of years. One hitherto non-valorized feedstock are so-called humins, a residual product formed in the conversion of sugars to platform chemicals, such as hydroxymethylfurfural and methoxymethylfurfural, intermediates in the production of FDCA, a building block used to produce the polyethylene furanoate (PEF) bottle by Avantium. The focus of this study is to investigate the spray combustion behavior of humins as a renewable alternative for heavy fuel oil (HFO) under large two-stroke engine-like conditions in an optically accessible constant volume chamber.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0108
Alessandro Montanaro, Marianna Migliaccio, Luigi Allocca, Carlo Beatrice, Valentina Fraioli, Roberto Ianniello
Abstract In the present paper, a new concept of open nozzle spray was investigated as possible application for compression ignition engines. The study concerns an experimental and numerical characterization of a spray generated through a prototype high-pressure hollow-cone nozzle (HCN). The experimental description of the injection process was carried out under evaporative and non-evaporative conditions injecting the fuel in a constant-volume combustion vessel controlled in pressure and temperature in order to measure the spatial and temporal fuel pattern at engine-like gas densities. OpenFOAM libraries in the lib-ICE version of the numerical code were employed for simulating the spray dynamics after a first validation phase based on the experimental data. Results show a typical spray structure of the outward-opening nozzle with the overall fluid-dynamic arrangement having a good fuel distribution along the hollow-cone geometry but showing a reduced spatial penetration.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0109
Nic Van Vuuren, Lucio Postrioti, Gabriele Brizi, Federico Picchiotti
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) diesel exhaust aftertreatment systems are virtually indispensable to meet NOx emissions limits worldwide. These systems generate the NH3 reductant by injecting aqueous urea solution (AUS-32/AdBlue®/DEF) into the exhaust for the SCR NOx reduction reactions. Understanding the AUS-32 injector spray performance is critical to proper optimization of the SCR system. Specifically, better knowledge is required of urea sprays under operating conditions including those where fluid temperatures exceed the atmospheric fluid boiling point. Results were previously presented from imaging of an AUS-32 injector spray which showed substantial structural differences in the spray between room temperature fluid conditions, and conditions where the fluid temperature approached and exceeded 104° C and “flash boiling” of the fluid was initiated.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0106
Alessandro Montanaro, Luigi Allocca, Amedeo Amoresano, Giuseppe Langella
Abstract The analysis of a spray behavior is confined to study the fluid dynamic parameters such as axial and radial velocity of the droplets, size distribution of the droplets, and geometrical aspect as the penetration length. In this paper, the spray is considered like a dynamic system and consequently it can be described by a number of parameters that characterize its dynamic behavior. The parameter chosen to describe the dynamic behavior is the external cone angle. This parameter has been detected by using an experimental injection chamber, a multi-hole (8 holes) injector for GDI applications and recorded by a high-speed C-Mos camera. The images have been elaborated by a fuzzy logic and neural network algorithm and are processed by using a chaos deterministic theory. This procedure carries out a map distribution of the working point of the spray and determines the stable (signature of the spray) and instable behavior.
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