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2009-11-12
WIP Standard
AIR64C
This document considers the cooling of equipment installed in equipment centers, which usually consist of rack-mounted equipment and panel mounted equipment in the flight deck. In instances where these two locations result in different requirements, these are identified. For purposes of this document, the cooled equipment is referred to generally as E/E equipment, deonting that both electrical and electronic equipment is considered, or as an E/E equipment line-replaceable-unit (LRU). The majority of cooled equipment takes the form of LRUs. This document primarily relates to E/E equipment which is designed to use forced air cooling in order to maintain the equipment operating performance (within acceptable tolerances), and to maintain reliability. Cooling may be applied internally or externally to the case of the item of E/E equipment. There are also E/E equipment items which are cooled by natural convection, conduction, and radiation to the surrounding environment.
2016-09-10
WIP Standard
AIR1811B
The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide guidelines for the selection and design of airborne liquid cooling systems. This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
2014-09-26
WIP Standard
AIR4766/2A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides information on aircraft cabin air quality, including: - Airborne contaminant gases, vapors, and aerosols. - Identified potential sources. - Comfort, health and safety issues. - Airborne chemical measurement. - Regulations and standards. - Operating conditions and equipment that may cause aircraft cabin contamination by airborne chemicals (including Failure Conditions and normal Commercial Practices). - Airborne chemical control systems. It does not deal with airflow requirements.
2013-07-01
WIP Standard
AIR1168/3A
This section presents methods and examples of computing the steady-state heating and cooling loads of aircraft compartments. In a steady-state process the flows of heat throughout the system are stabilized and thus do not change with time. In an aircraft compartment, several elements compose the steady-state air conditioning load.
HISTORICAL
2011-02-10
Standard
AIR1706
This document has been declared “CANCELLED” as of January 2010. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Aerospace Standards Index.
2016-10-21
WIP Standard
AIR1609B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers the design parameters for various methods of humidification applicable to aircraft, the physiological aspects of low humidities, the possible benefits of controlling cabin humidity, the penalties associated with humidification, and the problems which must be solved for practical aircraft humidification systems. The design information is applicable to commercial and military aircraft. The physiological aspects cover all aircraft environmental control applications.
2014-11-23
WIP Standard
AS8040C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers combustion heaters used in the following applications: a. Cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating) b. Wing and empennage anti-icing c. Engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft) d. Aircraft de-icing
2016-10-10
WIP Standard
ARP292D
This ARP discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, environmental conditions, and design considerations for helicopter environmental control systems (ECS). The helicopter ECS comprises that arrangement of equipment, controls, and indicators which supply and distribute dehumidified conditioned air for ventilation, cooling and heating of th eoccupied compartments, and cooling of the avionics. The principal features of the system are: a. A controlled fresh air supply b. A means for cooling (air or vapor cycle units and heat exchangers c. A means for removing excess moisture from the air supply d. A means for heating e. A temperature control system f. A conditioned air distribution system The ARP is applicable to both civil and military helicopters when an ECS is specified; however, certain requirements peculiar to military applications, such as nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) protection, are not covered.
2017-08-08
WIP Standard
AIR1266B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) outlines concepts for the design and use of fault isolation equipment that have general application. The specific focus is on fault isolation of environmental control systems (ECS) in commercial transports. Presented are general fault isolation purposes, design principles, and demonstration of compliance criteria. These are followed by three design examples to aid in understanding the design principles. Future trends in built-in-test-equipment (BITE) design are discussed, some of which represent concepts already being implemented on new equipment.
CURRENT
1999-03-01
Standard
ARP217D
This document deals with ground and flight test of airplane installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS), Figure 1. The ECS provide an environment, controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include the following: pressure, temperature, humidity, ventilation air velocity, ventilation rate, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and environment composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.). The ECS are composed of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply, distribute, recycle and exhaust air to maintain the desired environment.
CURRENT
1998-01-01
Standard
ARP292C
This ARP discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, environmental conditions, and design considerations for helicopter environmental control systems (ECS). The helicopter ECS comprises that arrangement of equipment, controls, and indicators which supply and distribute dehumidified conditioned air for ventilation, cooling and heating of the occupied compartments, and cooling of the avionics. The principal features of the system are: A controlled fresh air supply A means for cooling (air or vapor cycle units and heat exchangers) A means for removing excess moisture from the air supply A means for heating A temperature control system A conditioned air distribution system The ARP is applicable to both civil and military helicopters where an ECS is specified; however, certain requirements peculiar to military applications, such as nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) protection, are not covered.
CURRENT
1996-07-01
Standard
ARP780B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides symbols to schematically represent aerospace vehicle environmental system components on functional flow schematic drawings and graphical computerized output. The symbols are for use on simplified diagrams that provide basic information about an environmental system. Symbols are provided to represent basic types of components used in environmental systems. Simple variations of basic symbol types are provided. Words on the schematic diagram, special symbol codes, or symbols that combine basic symbol types (Section 5) can be used to augment the basic symbols when appropriate. Special or combined symbols not contained in this document should be defined on the schematic diagram. An example of a complete schematic is given in Section 6. A bibliography of other documents on environmental system symbols is found in Appendix A.
CURRENT
2003-01-14
Standard
ARP731C
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to establish recommendations for the design, installation and testing of air vehicle vapor cycle refrigeration systems. These recommendations are representative of the refrigerant cycles.
CURRENT
2011-08-10
Standard
ARP735A
This Aerospace Recommended Practice outlines the design, installation, testing and field maintenance criteria for aerospace vehicle cryogenic duct systems. These recommendations are considered currently applicable guides and are subject to revision due to the continuing development within industry.
CURRENT
1997-12-01
Standard
ARP699E
This Recommended Practice is intended to outline the design, installation, testing, and field maintenance criteria for a high temperature metal pneumatic duct system, for use as a guide in the aircraft industry. These recommendations are to be considered as currently applicable and necessarily subject to revision from time to time, as a result of the rapid development of the industry.
CURRENT
2015-05-29
Standard
ARP986D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines recommended analysis and test procedures for qualification of pneumatically, electrically, manually, and hydraulically actuated air valves. They may be further defined as valves that function in response to externally applied forces or in response to variations in upstream and/or downstream duct air conditions in order to maintain a calibrated duct air condition (e.g., air flow, air pressure, air temperature, air pressure ratio, or air shutoff). Qualification testing performed on the airplane to verify compatibility of the valve function and stability as part of a complete system is outside the scope of this document. Refer to ARP1270 for design and certification requirements for cabin pressurization control system components. As this document is only a guide, it does not supersede or relieve any requirements contained in detailed Customer specifications.
CURRENT
2010-06-17
Standard
ARP987B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the causes and impacts of moisture and/or condensation in avionics equipment and provides recommendations for corrective and preventative action.
CURRENT
2013-02-14
Standard
AS8040B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers combustion heaters used in the following applications: Cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating) Wing and empennage anti-icing Engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft) Aircraft de-icing
CURRENT
2011-10-17
Standard
AIR910C
The purpose of this report is to provide information on ozone, its effects, generally accepted ozone exposure limits (aviation and non-aviation), and methods of its control in high altitude aircraft. Sources of information are listed and referenced in the text.
CURRENT
2011-10-17
Standard
AIR860B
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only. No attempt has been made to develop the complete electrical circuitry associated with the electrical heating components; however, the electrical circuitry required for heating component operation, safety, and monitoring will be included as available. Specific design information is given for various modern aircraft utilizing electrical heating. Each aircraft discussed will be identified by alphabetical letter designation and included in the appropriate appendix.
CURRENT
2015-11-19
Standard
AIR1957A
This document summarizes types of heat sinks and considerations in relation to the general requirements of aircraft heat sources, and it provides information to achieve efficient utilization and management of these heat sinks. In this document, a heat sink is defined as a body or substance used for removal of the heat generated by thermodynamic processes. This document provides general data about airborne heat sources, heat sinks, and modes of heat transfer. The document also discusses approaches to control the use of heat sinks and techniques for analysis and verification of heat sink management. The heat sinks are for aircraft operating at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
HISTORICAL
2002-09-16
Standard
AIR1957
This document summarizes types of heat sinks and considerations in relation to the general requirements of aircraft heat sources, and it provides information to achieve efficient utilization and management of these heat sinks. In this document, a heat sink is defined as a body or substance used for removal of the heat generated by hydrodynamic or thermodynamic processes. This document provides general data about airborne heat sources, heat sinks, and modes of heat transfer. The document also discusses approaches to control the use of heat sinks and techniques for analysis and verification of heat sink management. The heat sinks are for aircraft operating at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
CURRENT
2009-06-05
Standard
AIR1204A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) outlines the design considerations and criteria for the control of water carryover from the environmental control system (ECS) with respect to causes and indicated corrective or preventative action. In addition, condensation on structure will be reviewed with possible preventative action described.
CURRENT
1993-11-01
Standard
AIR1266A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) outlines concepts for the design and use of fault isolation equipment that have general application. The specific focus is on fault isolation of environmental control systems (ECS) in commercial transports. Presented are general fault isolation purposes, design principles, and demonstration of compliance criteria. These are followed by three design examples to aid in understanding the design principles. Future trends in built-in-test-equipment (BITE) design are discussed, some of which represent concepts already being implemented on new equipment.
CURRENT
2005-02-09
Standard
AIR1277B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) contains information on the thermal design requirements of airborne avionic systems used in military airborne applications. Methods are explored which are commonly used to provide thermal control of avionic systems. Both air and liquid cooled systems are discussed.
CURRENT
2005-03-21
Standard
AIR1609A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers the design parameters for various methods of humidification applicable to aircraft, the physiological aspects of low humidities, the possible benefits of controlling cabin humidity, the penalties associated with humidification, and the problems which must be solved for practical aircraft humidification systems. The design information is applicable to commercial and military aircraft. The physiological aspects cover all aircraft environmental control applications.
CURRENT
1997-10-01
Standard
AIR1600A
The environmental factors of prime importance in the transport of animals in aircraft are air temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide concentration, and of course space (or volume) limitations. Secondary factors are air velocity, noise, lighting, etc. Pressure is not addressed herein as pressure levels and rates of change are totally dictated by human occupancy requirements. Some basic governmental documents, such as References 1, 2 and 3, define overall requirements for animal transportation, but with very limited data on environmental requirements. Reference 4 gives some airplane characteristics measured during animal transportation from the USA to foreign destinations. Temperature and humidity profiles are indicative of airplane characteristics. This report presents information on the temperature, humidity, ventilation, and carbon dioxide limitations and the metabolic heat release rates for animals which will allow the determination of the environment required by the animals.
CURRENT
1997-10-01
Standard
AIR1811A
This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
HISTORICAL
1994-09-01
Standard
AIR1823
The Environmental Control Analysis SYstem (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. Development of this computer program initially was sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory. (See References 1, 2, 3, and 4.) It provides techniques for determination of steady state and dynamic (transient) ECS performance, and of control system stability; and for synthesis of optimal ECS control systems. The program is available from the U.S. Air Force, or as a proprietary commercial version. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. Appendices provide general definitions for dynamic analysis, and samples of input and output for EASY.
CURRENT
2017-01-05
Standard
AIR5661A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides data and general analysis methods for calculation of internal and external, pressurized and unpressurized airplane compartment pressures during rapid discharge of cabin pressure. References to the applicable current FAA and EASA rules and advisory material are provided. While rules and interpretations can be expected to evolve, numerous airplanes have been approved under current and past rules that will have a continuing need for analysis of production and field modifications, alterations and repairs. The data and basic principles provided by this report are adaptable to any compartment decompression analysis requirement.
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