Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 88
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1407
Fanghui Shi
Presented in the paper is a comprehensive analysis for floating piston pin. It is more challenging because it is a special type of journal bearing where the rotation of the journal is coupled with the friction between the journal and the bearing. In this analysis, the multi-degree freedom mass-conserving mixed-EHD equations are solved to determine the coupled pin rotation and friction. Other bearing characteristics, such as minimum film thickness, pin secondary motions in both connecting-rod small-end bearing and piston pin-boss bearing, power loss etc are also determined. The mechanism for floating pin to have better scuffing resistance is discovered. The theoretical and numerical model is implemented in the GM internal software FLARE (Friction and Lubrication Analysis for Reciprocating Engines).
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0738
Cwo Gee Liang
A simulation methodology is developed for the Constant Radius Constant Speed (CRCS) analysis to predict the ISO4138 [1] road test performance. The CRCS analysis can be used to predict the vehicle steady-state handling characteristics such as understeer, rear cornering compliance, and roll gradient, etc. The Yaw-Rate Control methodology is applied to replace the traditional driver-in-the-loop path-following approaches. Comparing to the path-following approaches, the proposed method is simpler to use, more efficient, accurate, and robust.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0740
Laurentiu Buzdugan, Cwo Gee Liang
The imperative to get to the market faster with new and better products, has determined all automotive OEM to rethink their product development cycle, and, as a result, many hardware based processes were replaced and/or augmented with virtual, software based ones. However, the virtualization itself does not guaranties better and faster products. In the area of vehicle dynamics, we concentrate on improving the multi-body model development process, facilitating comprehensive virtual testing, and verifying the robustness of the design. The authors present a highly flexible and efficient environment that encourages, enforces, and facilitates model sharing, reusing of components, and parallelization of vehicle dynamics simulations, developed on top of an existing commercial off-the-shelf engineering software application.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0699
Darrell Robinette, Michael Powell
A cost effective means of achieving fuel economy gains in conventional powertrain is to utilize a 12 volt start/stop (S/S) system to turn the engine off and on during periods of vehicle idle. This paper presents powertrain integration issues specific to a 12 volt S/S system and the powertrain hardware content and calibration strategies required to execute a 12 volt S/S system for start ability, reduced noise and vibration (N&V) and vehicle launch. A correlated lumped parameter modeling methodology is used to determine engine startup profiles, starter hardware and intake cam park position requirements based upon vehicle level response to the startup event. Optimization of the engine startup is reported for a multitude of powertrain configurations, including transverse and longitudinal arrangements with manual, automatic and dual clutch transmissions.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0695
Hossein Javaherian, Alan W. Brown, Michael P. Nolan
A frequency-domain approach to balancing of air-fuel ratio (A/F) in a multi-cylinder engine is described. The technique utilizes information from a single Wide-Range Air-Fuel ratio (WRAF) or a single switching (production) O₂ sensor installed in the exhaust manifold of an internal combustion engine to eliminate the imbalances. At the core of the proposed approach is the development of a simple novel method for the characterization of A/F imbalances among the cylinders. The proposed approach provides a direct objective metric for the characterization of the degree of A/F imbalances for diagnostic purposes as well as a methodology for the control of A/F imbalances among various cylinders. The fundamental computational requirement is based on the calculation of a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) of the A/F signal as measured by a WRAF or a switching O₂ sensor.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0694
Yue-Yun Wang, Yongsheng He, Sai Rajagopalan
Fuel economy improvement and stringent emission regulations worldwide require advanced air charging and combustion technologies, such as low temperature combustion, PCCI or HCCI combustion. Furthermore, NOx aftertreatment systems, like Selective Catalyst Reduction (SCR) or lean NOx trap (LNT), are needed to reduce vehicle tailpipe emissions. The information on engine-out NOx emissions is essential for engine combustion optimization, for engine and aftertreatment system development, especially for those involving combustion optimization, system integration, control strategies, and for on-board diagnosis (OBD). A physical NOx sensor involves additional cost and requires on-board diagnostic algorithms to monitor the performance of the NOx sensor.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0786
Maolin Tsai, Hyung-Joo Hong, Robert L. Geisler, Glenn T. Babiak
Dynamic modal frequency structural analysis incorporating ADAMS/Flex dynamic load prediction and structural modal stress can provide accurate dynamic stress history for fatigue analysis and synthesis. The amount of data input to finite element analysis is reduced significantly compared to traditional modal & direct transient finite element analysis techniques. Compared to traditional dynamic loads prediction, no additional simulation effort is required except for incorporating flexible body models of structural components into the ADAMS model. This structural analysis technique seamlessly comprehends the correct geometry and force boundary conditions together for long duration dynamic stress calculations. This technique also provided the solution for the deficiency of traditional quasi-static inertia relief method, which is particularly significant for structural system with either significant deformation or articulation.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0790
Shunmugam Baskar, Salman khan
This paper describes an analytical methodology for predicting the fatigue life of a door system for check load durability cycles. A check stop load durability cycle occurs when a customer opens the door beyond the door detent position with a force applied on the check link or hinge check stops. This method combines Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model and fatigue code to compute the durability requirements. The FEA model consists of Door-in-White (DIW) on body with integrated hinge check link or independent check link. Nonlinear material, geometric and parts contact were considered for the door with body-in-white (BIW). Several door hinge designs, with integrated and independent check links, were investigated. Using the Von Mises stress and plastic strain from the above analysis, the fatigue life was predicted and compared with the test data. Integrating FEA and fatigue allows predicting the threshold total strain value, which is developed, for check load durability requirements.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0791
Joseph A. Schudt, Maolin Tsai, Ravindra Patil, Robert Geisler
Jounce bumpers are the primary component by which vertical wheel travel is limited in our suspensions. Typically, the jounce bumper is composed of closed or open cell urethane material, which has relatively low stiffness at initial compression with highly progressive stiffness at full compression. Due to this highly progressive stiffness at high load, peak loads are extremely sensitive to changes in input energy (affected by road surface, tire size, tire pressure, etc.) A “Dual Rate Jounce Bumper” concept is described that reduces this sensitivity. Additionally, various mechanizations of the concept are described as well as the specific program benefits, where applicable.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0792
Fan Li, Stephen Sibal, Peiran Ding
For a system which involves a fluid medium contained inside a deformable structure, such as a liquid fuel system, a simulation which couples the structure and fluid may be required depending on the operating conditions and system performance metric of interest. Simulation methods for fluid / structure interaction (FSI) have been gradually developed by CAE engineers with the advent of increased computer power. A robust fuel system design requires carefully designed components that can withstand all loadings it may experience. This paper presents both LS-Dyna's Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) and Abaqus' Coupled Eulerian-Lagrange (CEL) methods for predicting the structural performance of a fuel tank system and demonstrates that a fuel tank systems and their components can be numerically evaluated before the products release.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0767
Hesham A. Ezzat, Richard Roth, Theresa M. Lee, Randall J. Urbance, Randolph Kirchain
The ability to make accurate decisions concerning early body-in-white architectures is critical to an automaker since these decisions often have long term cost and weight impacts. We address this need with a methodology which can be used to assist in body architecture decisions using process-based technical cost modeling (TCM) as a filter to evaluate alternate designs. Despite the data limitations of early design concepts, TCM can be used to identify key trends for cost-effectiveness between design variants. A compact body-in-white architecture will be used as a case study to illustrate this technique. The baseline steel structure will be compared to several alternate aluminum intensive structures in the context of production volume.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0769
Bryan J. Stewart, Hesham Ahmed Ezzat, Marcel R. Cannon, Stephen E. Kensett
Crush cans are used as replaceable energy absorbing devices that minimize the damage to the front motor compartment main structural rails during a low speed crash event. This is done in an effort to reduce insurance repair costs, which is especially important in Europe where DANNER/TIC insurance ratings drive consumer cost of ownership and may influence the purchase selection. There are multiple approaches to crush can designs and methods of attachment to the motor compartment rails. One such approach is to utilize a “stick-in” design where the crush can is inserted into the rail section then bolted from the sides. Such designs typically require extra back-up brackets inside the main rails to help provide an adequate reaction structure that allows the desired crush initiation to occur within the can and prevent premature yielding in the main rails during a low speed crash incident. These added brackets, however, translate into additional mass and cost to the vehicle.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0749
Kallappa Pattada, Satnam Singh, Pulak Bandyopadhyay
This paper presents an interactive, fault model-based prototype diagnostic tool that will assist service technicians in isolating the root cause of vehicle problems and performing corrective repairs. Current automotive service procedures are driven primarily by static service manuals that inform technicians on the service steps in case a specific diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is set in a vehicle. Although comprehensive, these service procedures usually require technicians to gather and integrate diagnostic information from several sources, such as DTCs, customer complaints and manual test results. This can lead to increased repair time and labor costs. The fault model-based interactive service procedure tool discussed in this paper will guide the technician to isolate the fault and provide him/her with recommendations for the correct repair actions. The tool uses a fault model, built using service procedures information, historical repair data and engineering inputs.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0756
Mark Steffka
The engineering of electric propulsion systems requires time and cost efficient methodologies to determine system characteristics as well as potential component integration issues. A significant part of this analysis is the identification of the electromagnetic fields present in the propulsion system. Understanding of the electromagnetic fields during system operation is a significant design consideration due to the use of components that require large current(s) and high voltage(s) in the proximity of other control system items (such as sensors) that operate with low current(s) and voltage(s). Therefore, it is critical to quantify the electromagnetic fields produced by these components within the design and how they may interact with other system components. Often overlooked (and also extremely important) is an evaluation of how the overall system architecture can generate or react to electromagnetic fields (which may be a direct result of packaging approaches).
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0242
Sankar Rao Nallapati, Jason Miller, Srinivasa Mandadapu, Balakrishna Chinta
Engineering has continuously strived to improve the vehicle development process to achieve high quality designs and quick to launch products. The design process has to have the tools and capabilities to help ensure both quick to the market product and a flawless launch. To achieve high fidelity and robust design, mistakes and other quality issues must be addressed early in the engineering process. One way to detect problems early is to use the math based modeling and simulation techniques of the analysis group. The correlation of the actual vehicle performance to the predictive model is crucial to obtain. Without high correlation, the change management process begins to get complicated and costs start to increase exponentially. It is critical to reduce and eliminate the risk in a design up front before tooling begins to kick off. The push to help achieve a high rate of correlation has been initiated by engineering management, seeing this as an asset to the business.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0421
V. A. Muruganandam, Maruthi Dhulipudi, Uday Korde
Coolant pipes are a prime connection units present in any engines that facilitates the flow of coolant and thereby keeping the engine under its optimum operating condition. Among the several influencing factors that deteriorate engines performance, the coolant leak is also one of the contributors. This could be caused primly due to leakage issues that arises from the pipe press fit zones. Henceforth it is very important to understand the root cause of this press-fit connection failure. The present study deals with press-fit between the pipe and housing in an engine which is subjected to extreme thermal loads (min of -40°C to a max temperature of +150°C) thereby causing the press-fit loosening effect.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0447
Arkadeb Ghosal, Paolo Giusto, Prakash Peranandam, Purnendu Sinha, Haibo Zeng
Recent trends in the automotive industry show growing demands for the introduction of new in-vehicle features (e.g., smart-phone integration, adaptive cruise control, etc.) at increasing rates and with reduced time-to-market. New technological developments (e.g., in-vehicle Ethernet, multi-core technologies, AUTOSAR standardized software architectures, smart video and radar sensors, etc.) provide opportunities as well as challenges to automotive designers for introducing and implementing new features at lower costs, and with increased safety and security. As a result, the design of Electrical/Electronic (E/E) architectures is becoming increasingly challenging as several hardware resources are needed. In our earlier work, we have provided top-level definitions for three relevant metrics that can be used to evaluate E/E architecture alternatives in the early stages of the design process: flexibility, scalability and expandability.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0450
Mina Khoee-Fard, Tarek Lahdhiri
As the new features for driver assistance and active safety systems are growing rapidly in vehicles, the simulation within a virtual environment has become a necessity. The current active safety system consists of Electronic Control Units (ECUs) which are coupled to camera and radar sensors. Two methods of implementation exists, integrated sensors with control modules or separation of sensors form control modules. The subsystem integration testing poses new challenges for virtual environment for simulation of active safety features. The comprehensive simulation environment for integration testing consists of chassis controls, powertrain, driver assistance, body and displays controllers. Additional complexity in the system is the serial communication strategy. Multiple communication protocols such as GMLAN, LIN, standard CAN, and Flexray could be present within the same vehicle topology.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0667
Ramesh Rebba, Jeong Hun Seo, Ann Marie Sastry, Mary Fortier
Rechargeable energy storage systems with Lithium-ion pouch cells are subject to various ambient temperature conditions and go through thousands of charge-discharge cycles during the life time of operation. The cells may change their thickness with internal heat generation, cycling and any other mechanisms. The stacked prismatic cells thus experience face pressure and this could impact the pack electrical performance. The pack consists of stiff end plates keeping the pack in tact using bolts, cooling fins to maintain cell temperature and foam padding in between cells. The pack level thermal requirements limit the amount of temperature increase during normal operating conditions. Similarly, the structural requirements state that the stresses and the deflection in the end plates should be minimal. Uncertainties in cell, foam mechanical and thermal properties might add variation to the pack performance.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0644
Shailendra Kaushik, Kuo-huey Chen, Taeyoung Han, Bahram Khalighi
Energy efficient HVAC system is becoming increasingly important as higher Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards are required for future vehicle products. The present study is a preliminary attempt at designing energy efficient HVAC system by introducing localized heating/cooling concepts without compromising occupant thermal comfort. In order to achieve this goal of reduced energy consumption while maintaining thermal comfort it is imperative that we use an analytical model capable of predicting thermal comfort with reasonable accuracy in a non-homogenous enclosed thermal environment such as a vehicle's passenger cabin. This study will primarily focus on two aspects: (a) energy efficiency improvements in an HVAC system through micro-cooling/heating strategies and (b) validation of an analytical approach developed in GM that would support the above effort.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0840
Ronald O. Grover, Jr.
A CFD code is enhanced with a fuel tracer diagnostic to track the liquid and vapor fuel mass separately from individual spray plumes of a multi-hole injector and the wall film. The approach works by solving a set of additional scalar transport equations for fuel vapor generated from individual nozzle hole and the wall film. The diagnostic tool is first validated against experiments from a 4-valve, wall-guided spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine. A CFD analysis is carried out to understand the experimentally observed trade-offs in combustion stability and smoke emissions between a 70degree hollow-cone swirl injector and a 40 degree, 5-hole, circular-type multi-hole injector at a lean, stratified idle operating condition. Engine tests show that the multi-hole injector results in lower COV of IMEP than the hollow-cone swirl injector at the expense of significantly higher smoke emissions.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0934
Pierpaolo Antonioli, Romualdo Ruotolo, Marcello Rimondi, Daniele Lomario
In the automotive industry, CAE methods are now widely used to predict several functional characteristics and to develop designs that are first-time-capable to meet programs targets. The N&V area is one of the increasing key factors for a product differentiation; costumers expect not only more powerful and more fuel efficient but also less noisy engines. The oil pan is one of the bigger contributors to engine radiated noise and to diesel knocking, so that great attention is paid within GM to optimize oil pans of Diesel engines by following a CAE-based approach to achieve a “first-time-capable” design for this component. This allows focusing the subsequent N&V testing activities to pinpoint modifications mainly on those components with shorter lead time. This paper describes the key-steps that are executed to optimize the oil pan design by using CAE methods with the main intent of reducing its noise radiation.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0956
Nathan Picot, Bryan Miller, Michael D. Rizzo, Thomas A. Klingler
Incomplete vehicles are partially manufactured by an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) and subsequently sold to and completed by a final-stage manufacturer. Section S8.8, Final-Stage Manufacturers and Alterers, of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 126 states “Vehicle that are manufactured in two or more stages or that are altered (within the meaning of 49 CFR 567.7) after having been previously certified in accordance with Part 567 of this chapter, are not subject to the requirements of S8.1 through S8.5. Instead, all vehicles produced by these manufacturers on or after September 1, 2012, must comply with this standard.” The FMVSS 126 compliance of the completed vehicle can be certified in three ways: by the OEM provided no alterations are made to identified components (TYPE 1), conditionally by the OEM provided the final-stage manufacturer follows specific guidelines (TYPE 2), or by the final-stage manufacturer (TYPE 3).
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0955
Bryan Miller, Michael D. Rizzo, Robert L. Taylor, Joshua R. Auden
Brake Assist System (BAS) requirements have been established by the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) in R13H. Electronic Stability Control (ESC) systems typically have the value added function of Panic Brake Assist (PBA) which is defined as a Category C (sensitive to multiple criteria) Brake Assist System. PBA is designed to force the vehicle into Antilock Brake System (ABS) and to maintain ABS control when the driver spikes the brake pedal and then temporarily reduces brake pedal force before reasserting more brake pedal force. ECE test protocol requires the use of brake ramp applications to define the mean acceleration force (maF) curve which is used to define the brake pedal force where ABS activates (FABS). After completing the brake ramp application test maneuvers and completing the data processing to define the maF curve, FABS, upper, and FABS, lower, the test driver then proceeds to run the panic brake assist portion of the test.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0978
Anthony Dutts, Xuting Wu, Max Farhad
There are generally two types of directional instability that are associated with a vehicle/trailer combination system. The first is typically referred to as static or divergent instability (jack-knifing), which is a common cause of highway accidents. The second can be called dynamic or oscillatory instability (“snaking” or “fish-tailing”). This type of oscillation occurs due to inherently low system damping at higher speeds [1]. It is sensitive to system parameters and operating conditions and may be excited by various disturbances, such as side wind or abrupt steering inputs. Controlling trailer yaw oscillation can be challenging, especially in markets where small passenger cars are commonly used to tow relatively massive trailers at highway speeds with low hitch loads. This study focuses on the second of the two aforementioned types of instability - dynamic or oscillatory instability.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1010
Pavitra Kumar Mukherjee, Dhanasekaran Radhakrishnan, Sunil Arole, Scott Larsen, David Wilkinson
This paper will present the Systems Engineering perspective of HTC (High Throughput Compute) architecture for rapid meshing and assembly that resembles HPC (High Performance Compute) cloud architecture. The architectural framework addresses the modeling requirements in CAE (Computer Aided Engineering) and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) domains. The architecture for building a rapid modeling framework is discussed along with a brief description of the procedure to create one such application. Meshing and preparing the math model for CAE/CFD analysis is a time and computation intensive process. Reducing the meshing and model preparation time increases the possible number of analysis iterations before the final design intent model is finalized. The HTC architecture helps in relieving the effort of redevelopment for changing business requirements and provides the flexibility to meet the evolving needs of engineering.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1004
Arkadeb Ghosal, Barbara Czerny, Joseph D'Ambrosio
Given the fast changing market demands, the growing complexity of features, the shorter time to market, and the design/development constraints, the need for efficient and effective verification and validation methods are becoming critical for vehicle manufacturers and suppliers. One such example is fault-tree analysis. While fault-tree analysis is an important hazard analysis/verification activity, the current process of translating design details (e.g., system level and software level) is manual. Current experience indicates that fault tree analysis involves both creative deductive thinking and more mechanical steps, which typically involve instantiating gates and events in fault trees following fixed patterns. Specifically for software fault tree analysis, a number of the development steps typically involve instantiating fixed patterns of gates and events based upon the structure of the code. In this work, we investigate a methodology to translate software programs to fault trees.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1020
Asaf Degani, Andrew W. Gellatly PhD
In this paper we discuss the use of a formal approach to the problem of describing, evaluating, and specifying human-machine interaction. The statecharts language, originally conceived by David Harel [1], is used to describe the behavior of the machine (i.e., its states and transitions), interface indications (e.g., light indicators on switches), and user interaction (selecting applications, switching modes, entering parameters, etc.). We illustrate how the statecharts language can be used to describe driver interaction with a climate control system, and show how it is possible to systematically evaluate user interaction. The paper concludes with several observations about the utility of formal language for generating sound design specification of human-machine systems.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1233
Xuefeng Tao, Michael Kropinski, Colin Hultengren, Kenneth Lang, Manmeet Mavi
Due to the multitude of external design constraints, such as increasing fuel economy standards, and the increasing number of global vehicle programs, developers of automotive transmission controls have had to cope with increasing levels of system complexity while at the same time being forced by the marketplace to improve system quality, reduce development costs, and improve time to market. General Motors Powertrain (GMPT) chose to meet these challenges through General Motors Company's Road-to-Lab-to-Math (RLM) strategy, particularly the Math-based method of a virtual vehicle simulation environment called System Simulation. The use of System Simulation to develop transmission control algorithms has enabled GMPT to improve product quality and reduce development times and costs associated with the dependence on physical prototypes. Additionally, System Simulation has facilitated the reuse of GMPT controls development assets, improving overall controls development efficiency.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1274
Srinivasa Mandadapu, Balakrishna Chinta, Brian Jutila, Maria Schoenefeld
Roof racks are designed for carrying luggage during customers' travels. These rails need to be strong enough to be able to carry the luggage weight as well as be able to withstand aerodynamic loads that are generated when the vehicle is travelling at high speeds on highways. Traditionally, roof rail gage thickness is increased to account for these load cases (since these are manufactured by extrusion), but doing so leads to increased mass which adversely affects fuel efficiency. The current study focuses on providing the guidelines for strategically placing lightening holes and optimizing gage thickness so that the final design is robust to noise parameters and saves the most mass without adversely impacting wind noise performance while minimizing stress. The project applied Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) techniques to optimize roof rail parameters in order to improve the load carrying capacity while minimizing mass.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 88

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: