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2013-11-11
Technical Paper
2013-22-0010
Erik G. Takhounts, Matthew J. Craig, Kevin Moorhouse, Joe McFadden, Vikas Hasija
Rotational motion of the head as a mechanism for brain injury was proposed back in the 1940s. Since then a multitude of research studies by various institutions were conducted to confirm/reject this hypothesis. Most of the studies were conducted on animals and concluded that rotational kinematics experienced by the animal's head may cause axonal deformations large enough to induce their functional deficit. Other studies utilized physical and mathematical models of human and animal heads to derive brain injury criteria based on deformation/pressure histories computed from their models.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0559
Mohamed Kamel Salaani, Gary J. Heydinger, Paul A. Grygier
Abstract There exists a fairly extensive set of tire force measurements performed on dry pavement. But in order to develop a low-coefficient of friction tire model, a set of tire force measurements made on wet pavement is required. Using formulations and parameters obtained on dry roads, and then reducing friction level to that of a wet road is not sufficient to model tire forces in a high fidelity simulation. This paper describes the process of more accurately modeling low coefficient tire forces on the National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS). It is believed that the tire model improvements will be useful in many types of NADS simulations, including ESC and other advanced vehicle technology studies. In order to produce results that would come from a road surface that would be sufficiently slippery, a set of tires were shaved to 4/32 inches and sent to a tire-testing lab for measurement.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920584
Terry M. Klein
This report documents the accident data collection, processing and analysis methodology used by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in a major agency agency investigation of the rollover propensity of light duty vehicles. Specifically, these efforts were initiated in response to two petitions for rulemaking requesting the development of a standard for rollover stability. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the ability of a number of stability measures to predict vehicle rollover propensity, while accounting for a number of driver and environmental factors. It is not the intent of this paper to document formal agency policy in the area of any possible rulemaking efforts, and as such, references to these activities are not discussed. The reader can obtain information on this activity through normal agency procedures.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920358
Stuart G. Mentzer, Randa A. Radwan, William T. Hollowell
Abstract The SISAME methodology is a system for extracting one-dimensional lumped parameter vehicle crash models from non-oblique crash test data, and for simulation of such models. Model extraction is based on constrained least squares optimization of an overdetermined system of target equations for the model parameters. The SISAME computer program performs extraction and simulation with a number of features that allow user control of the computations and outputs. Additional computer programs perform data assessment/correction and filtering. Experience has shown that the SISAME methodology can efficiently produce predictively useful models that accurately capture the motions of the actual crash event. The essential formulation of SISAME and some sample applications are presented in this paper.
1993-03-01
Technical Paper
930482
Joseph N. Kanianthra, Glen C. Rains, Thomas J. Trella
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) upgraded the side impact protection requirement in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 214 and added dynamic requirements to reduce the likelihood of thoracic injuries in side crashes. As part of the agency's research in developing the requirements of the standard, NHTSA developed a mathematical model for simulation of side impacts. This paper investigates the overall safety performance, based on Thoracic Trauma Index (TTI) as the criteria for passenger cars in real world side crashes, with the aid of the simulation model. A Thoracic Trauma Index Factor (TTIF) is utilized to compare relative safety performance of passenger cars under various conditions of impact. The concept of relating energy dissipation in various side structure and padding countermeasures is used to develop a family of curves that are representative of a design platform.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970399
Shashi M. Kuppa, Mitchell B. Olson, Charles W. Yeiser, Lynne M. Taylor, Richard M. Morgan, Rolf H. Eppinger
A study of frontal collisions using the NASS data base showed that there were four times as many arm injuries to belt restrained drivers who had an air bag deploy than for the drivers who were simply belted. By far, the distal forearm/hand was the most commonly injured region. Hard copy review identified two modes of arm injury related to the deploying air bag: 1) The arm is directly contacted by the air bag module and/or flap cover, and 2) The arm is flung away and contacts an interior car surface. Based on the field studies, a mechanical device called the Research Arm Injury Device (RAID) was fabricated to assess the aggressivity of air bags from different manufacturers. Results from static air bag deployment tests with the RAID suggested that the RAID was able to clearly distinguish between the aggressive and non-aggressive air bags. Maximum moments ranging between 100 Nm and 650 Nm, and hand fling velocity ranging between 30 and 120 km/h were measured on the RAID in these tests.
1993-03-01
Technical Paper
930104
Steven W. Kirkpatrick, Bayard S. Holmes, William T. Hollowell, Hampton C. Gabler, Thomas J. Trella
A new numerical model of the side impact dummy (SID) was developed based on the DYNA3D finite element code. The model includes all of the material and structural details of SID that influence its performance in crash testing and can be run on an engineering work station in a reasonable time. This paper describes the development of the finite element model and compares model predictions of acceleration and displacements with measurements made in SID calibration experiments. Preliminary parameter studies with the model show the influence of material properties and design on the measurements made with the SID instrument.
1994-03-01
Technical Paper
941052
James R. Hackney, Charles J. Kahane, Vincent R. Quarles
This report is a condensed version of the December 1993 New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) report to Congress and provides: an historical review and future goals for NCAP. the results of an 18-month study to assess consumer and media needs in understanding and promoting the use of NCAP data. This included consumer focus groups and media studies. These studies indicated that consumers and the media desire comparative safety information on vehicles, a simplified NCAP format to better understand and utilize the crash test results, and would like to see NCAP expanded to include other crash modes. studies of real-world crashes versus NCAP crash tests. These studies conclude that NCAP test conditions approximate real-world crash conditions covering a major segment of the frontal crash safety problem and that there is a significant correlation between NCAP results and real-world fatality risks for restrained drivers.
1994-11-01
Technical Paper
942206
Richard M. Morgan, Rolf H. Eppinger, Mark P. Haffner, Narayan Yoganandan, Frank A. Pintar, Anthony Sances, Jeff R. Crandall, Walter D. Pilkey, Gregory S. Klopp, Dimitrios Kallieris, Erich Miltner, Rainer Mattem, Shashi M. Kuppa, Cheryl L. Sharpless
Sixty-three simulated frontal impacts using cadaveric specimens were performed to examine and quantify the performance of various contemporary automotive restraint systems. Test specimens were instrumented with accelerometers and chest bands to characterize their mechanical responses during the impact. The resulting thoracic injury severity was determined using detailed autopsy and was classified using the Abbreviated Injury Scale. The ability of various mechanical parameters and combinations of parameters to assess the observed injury severities was examined and resulted in the observation that belt restraint systems generally had higher injury rates than air bag restraint systems for the same level of mechanical responses. To provide better injury evaluations from observed mechanical parameters without prior knowledge of what restraint system was being used, a dichotomous process was developed.
1994-11-01
Technical Paper
942215
Faris A. Bandak, Rolf H. Eppinger
Finite element modelling has been used to study the evolution of strain in a model of the human brain under impulsive acceleration loadings. A cumulative damage measure, based on the calculation of the volume fraction of the brain that has experienced a specific level of stretch, is used as a possible predictor for deformation-related brain injury. The measure is based on the maximum principal strain calculated from an objective strain tensor that is obtained by integration of the rate of deformation gradient with appropriate accounting for large rotations. This measure is used here to evaluate the relative effects of rotational and translational accelerations, in both the sagittal and coronal planes, on the development of strain damage in the brain. A new technique for the computational treatment of the brain-dura interface is suggested and used to alleviate the difficulties in the explicit representation of the cerebrospinal fluid layer existing between the two solid materials.
1995-11-01
Technical Paper
952718
Frank P. DiMasi, Rolf H. Eppinger, Faris A. Bandak
Computational simulations are conducted for several head impact scenarios using a three dimensional finite element model of the human brain in conjunction with accelerometer data taken from crash test data. Accelerometer data from a 3-2-2-2 nine accelerometer array, located in the test dummy headpart, is processed to extract both rotational and translational velocity components at the headpart center of gravity with respect to inertial coordinates. The resulting generalized six degree-of-freedom description of headpart kinematics includes effects of all head impacts with the interior structure, and is used to characterize the momentum field and inertial loads which would be experienced by soft brain tissue under impact conditions. These kinematic descriptions are then applied to a finite element model of the brain to replicate dynamic loading for actual crash test conditions, and responses pertinent to brain injury are analyzed.
1995-11-01
Technical Paper
952710
Stanley H. Backaitis, Maurice E. Hicks, Priya Prasad, Tony Laituri, Jeffrey Nadeau
Locations of key body segments of Hybrid III dummies used in FMVSS 208 compliance tests and NCAP tests were measured and subjected to statistical analysis. Mean clearance dimensions and their standard deviations for selected body segments of driver and passenger occupants with respect to selected vehicle surfaces were determined for several classes of vehicles. These occupant locations were then investigated for correlation with impact responses measured in crash tests and by using a three dimensional human-dummy mathematical model in comparable settings. Based on these data, the importance of some of the clearance dimensions between the dummy and the vehicle surfaces was determined. The study also compares observed Hybrid III dummy positions within selected vehicles with real world occupant positions reported in published literature.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1245
Jason Kerrigan, Damien Subit, Costin Untaroiu, Jeff Crandall, Rodney Rudd
Vehicle front-end geometry and stiffness characteristics have been shown to influence pedestrian lower extremity response and injury patterns. The goal of this study is to compare the lower extremity response and injuries of post mortem human surrogates (PMHS) tested in full-scale vehicle-pedestrian impact experiments with a small sedan and a large sport utility vehicle (SUV). The pelves and lower limbs of six PMHS were instrumented with six-degree-of-freedom instrumentation packages. The PMHS were then positioned laterally in mid-stance gait and subjected to vehicle impact at 40 km/h with either a small sedan (n=3) or a large SUV (n=3). Detailed descriptions of the pelvic and lower extremity injuries are presented in conjunction with global and local kinematics data and high speed video images. Injured PMHS knee joints reached peak lateral bending angles between 25 and 85 degrees (exceeding published injury criteria) at bending rates between 1.1 deg/ms and 3.7 deg/ms.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0818
Mohamed Kamel Salaani, Chris Schwarz, Gary J. Heydinger, Paul A. Grygier
The paper discusses the development of a model for the 2006 BMW 330i for the National Advanced Driving Simulator's (NADS) vehicle dynamics simulation, NADSdyna. The front and rear suspensions are independent strut and link type suspensions modeled using recursive rigid-body dynamics formulations. The suspension springs and shock absorbers are modeled as force elements. The paper includes parameters for front and rear semi-empirical tire models used with NADSdyna. Longitudinal and lateral tire force plots are also included. The NADSdyna model provides state-of-the-art high-fidelity handling dynamics for real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulation. The realism of a particular model depends heavily on how the parameters are obtained from the actual physical system. Complex models do not guarantee high fidelity if the parameters used were not properly measured. Methodologies for determining the parameters are detailed in this paper.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1181
James Saunders, David L. Smith, Aida Barsan
The protection of a vehicle occupant in a frontal crash is a combination of vehicle front structural design and occupant restraint design. Once chosen and manufactured, these design features must interact with a wide variety of structural characteristics in potential crash partners. If robust, the restraint design will provide a high level of protection for a wide variety of crash conditions. This paper examines how robust a given restraint system is for occupant self-protection and how frontal design can improve the restraint performance of potential crash partners, thus improving their restraint robustness as well. To examine restraint robustness in self protection, the effect of various vehicle deceleration characteristics on occupant injury potential is investigated for a given restraint design.
1974-01-01
Technical Paper
746043
Edward M. Chandler
Attention in the United States is centering on investigations of lighter materials, more efficient structures, impact compatibility between cars, as well as between structure and restraints and simulation of collisions using both mechanical and computer techniques. This paper summarizes investigations as well as safety effects.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-22-0007
Erik G. Takhounts, Rolf H. Eppinger, J. Quinn Campbell, Rabih E. Tannous, Erik D. Power, Lauren S. Shook
The SIMon (Simulated Injury Monitor) software package is being developed to advance the interpretation of injury mechanisms based on kinematic and kinetic data measured in the advanced anthropomorphic test dummy (AATD) and applying the measured dummy response to the human mathematical models imbedded in SIMon. The human finite element head model (FEHM) within the SIMon environment is presented in this paper. Three-dimensional head kinematic data in the form of either a nine accelerometer array or three linear CG head accelerations combined with three angular velocities serves as an input to the model. Three injury metrics are calculated: Cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM) – a correlate for diffuse axonal injury (DAI); Dilatational damage measure (DDM) – to estimate the potential for contusions; and Relative motion damage measure (RMDM) – a correlate for acute subdural hematoma (ASDH).
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-1302
Frank S. Barickman, Duane L. Stoltzfus
A low cost system has been developed to measure a vehicle's lateral position relative to the lane markings on a roadway. The system is capable of tracking white or orange lines, solid or dashed edge lines, while operating in daylight or at night. The tracking system is comprised of two “off-the-shelf” black and white charge coupled device (CCD) video cameras along with commonly available electronic components. The lane tracking system is capable of outputting real time data at 30Hz through an analog output. Using the data from this sensor system it is possible to detect lane changes, determine the magnitude and duration of lane exceedances, and other metrics commonly used by researchers in the transportation community. This paper will discuss the design and performance of the system, processing of the raw lane tracker data, and the benefits and limitations of the technology.
2001-03-05
Technical Paper
2001-01-1167
Stephen Summers, Aloke Prasad, William T. Hollowell
This paper provides an update of NHTSA's research activities in vehicle compatibility and aggressivity. This paper pres ents new ly initiated efforts underw ay to develop test assessment meth odologie s intende d to evalua te vehic le compatibility. The rigid barrier load cell data collected from 18 years of the agency's New Car Assessment Program testing are reviewed to e valuate potentia l test measures that may be used to evaluate a vehic le's compatibility in vehicle-to-vehicle crashes. These parameters are then evaluated using a series of vehicle-to-vehic le and m oving deformable ba rrier (MDB)-to -veh icle tests. In these tests, the face of the MDB has been instrumented with an array of load cells to compute test measures. This study is part of NHTSA's ongoing compatib ility research program and is being coordinated with the IHRA compatibility group.
2001-03-05
Technical Paper
2001-01-0140
Mohamed Kamel Salaani, Gary J. Heydinger, Paul A. Grygier
The paper discusses the development of a model for a 1998 Chevrolet Malibu for the National Advanced Driving Simulator’s (NADS) vehicle dynamics simulation, NADSdyna. The Malibu is the third vehicle modeled for the NADS, and this is the third paper dealing with model development. SAE Paper 970564 contains details of the model for the 1994 Ford Taurus and SAE Paper 1999–01-0121 contains details of the model for the 1997 Jeep Cherokee. The front and rear suspensions are independent strut and link type suspensions modeled using recursive rigid body dynamics formulations. The suspension springs and shock absorbers are modeled as elements in the rigid body formulation. To complement the vehicle dynamics for the NADS application, subsystem models that include tire forces, braking, powertrain, aerodynamics, and steering are added to the rigid body dynamics model. The models provide state-of-the-art high fidelity vehicle handling dynamics for real-time simulation.
2003-03-03
Technical Paper
2003-01-0502
T. Shams, J. McDonald, N. Rangarajan, M. Haffner, G. Newaz, S. Nusier
The Isodamp damping material (also known as Navy Damp) used in the ribs of current crash test dummies provides human-like damping to the thorax under impact. However, the range of temperature over which it can be used is very small. A new rib design using laminates of steel, fiberglass, and commercially available viscoelastic material has been constructed. Load-deflection response and hysteresis of the laminated ribs were compared with corresponding conventional ribs fabricated from steel and Isodamp. Impact tests were conducted on laminated and conventional ribs at 18.5° C, 22.2° C and 26.6° C. Results indicate that the response of the laminated ribs is essentially the same as that of the ribs with Isodamp at 22.2° C, which is the operating temperature of the conventional ribs. The variation in the impact response of the newly developed laminated ribs in the temperature range of 18.5° C to 26.6° C was less than 10%.
2002-03-04
Technical Paper
2002-01-1022
Stephen Summers, William T. Hollowell, Aloke Prasad
A major focus of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) vehicle compatibility and aggressivity research program is the development of a laboratory test procedure to evaluate compatibility. This paper is written to explain the associated goals, issues, and design considerations and to review the preliminary results from this ongoing research program. One of NHTSA's activities supporting the development of a test procedure involves investigating the use of an mobile deformable barrier (MDB) into vehicle test to evaluate both the self-protection (crashworthiness) and the partner-protection (compatibility) of the subject vehicle. For this development, the MDB is intended to represent the median or expected crash partner. This representiveness includes such vehicle characteristics as weight, size, and frontal stiffness. This paper presents distributions of vehicle measurements based on 1996 fleet registration data.
2001-06-04
Technical Paper
2001-06-0107
M. Haffner, R. Eppinger, N. Rangarajan, T. Shams, M. Artis, D. Beach
Early influences upon Thor ATD development are described, and the path of Thor development is traced up to the release of the current Thor ALPHA ATD design. Since the display of the first Thor ATD prototype at the 15th ESV Conference in Melbourne in 1996, Thor has undergone extensive test and evaluation on an international basis in cooperation with many partner institutions. This paper summarizes some of the lessons learned from this broad test experience, and documents actions which have been undertaken to upgrade the Thor product to ALPHA status in light of this experience.
2001-06-04
Technical Paper
2001-06-0226
Linda McCray, Aida Barsan-Anelli
This paper describes computer crash simulations performed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) under the current research and testing activities on large school bus safety restraints. The simulations of a frontal rigid barrier test and comparative dynamic sled testing for compartmentalization, lap belt, and lap/shoulder belt restraint strategies are presented. School bus transportation is one of the safest forms of transportation in the United States. School age children transported in school buses are safer than children transported in motor vehicles of any other type. Large school buses provide protection because of their size and weight. Further, they must meet minimum Federal motor vehicle safety standards (FMVSSs) mandating compartmentalized seating, improved emergency exits, stronger roof structures and fuel systems, and better bus body joint strength.
2001-06-04
Technical Paper
2001-06-0178
Stephen M. Summers, William T. Hollowell
NHTSA uses a variety of computer modelling techniques to develop and evaluate test methods and mitigation concepts, and to estimate safety benefits for many of NHTSA's research activities. Computer modeling has been particularly beneficial for estimating safety benefits where often very little data are available. Also modeling allows researchers to augment test data by simulating crashes over a wider range of conditions than would otherwise be feasible. These capabilities are used for a wide range of projects from school bus to frontal, side, and rollover research programs. This paper provides an overview of these activities. NHTSA's most extensive modeling research involves developing finite element and articulated mass models to evaluate a range of vehicles and crash environments. These models are being used to develop a fleet wide systems model for evaluating compatibility issues.
2001-06-04
Technical Paper
2001-06-0184
Jason A. Stammen, Roger A. Saul, Brian Ko
Pedestrian research and testing at the NHTSA Vehicle Research and Test Center has recently focused on assessment of proposed ISO and EEVC head impact test procedures, and extension of these procedures to additional vehicle frontal surfaces. In addition to test parameter sensitivity evaluation, reconstruction of PCDS (Pedestrian Crash Data Study) cases with laboratory impact tests and computer simulations has been conducted. This paper presents the results of this research.
2001-11-12
Technical Paper
2001-01-2726
Daniel Blower, Vasanth Krishnaswami, Devi Putcha, Alrik Svenson
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the University of Michigan Transportation Institute are investigating truck design countermeasures to provide safety benefits during collisions with light vehicles. The goal is to identify approaches that would best balance costs and benefits. This paper outlines the first phase of this study, an analysis of two-vehicle, truck/light vehicle crashes from 1996 through 1998 using several crash data bases to obtain a current description and determine the scope of the aggressivity problem. Truck fronts account for 60% of light vehicle fatalities in collisions with trucks. Collision with the front of a truck carries the highest probability of fatal (K) or incapacitating (A) injury. Truck sides account for about the same number of K and A-injuries combined as truck fronts, though injury probability is substantially lower than in crashes involving the front of a truck.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0083
Vikas Gupta, T. J. Gunasekar, Avinash Rao, Jawahar Kamarajan, Stephen Summers
A methodology to develop full-vehicle representation in the form of a finite element model for crashworthiness studies has been evolved. Detailed finite element models of two passenger vehicles - 1995 Chevy Lumina and 1994 Dodge Intrepid have been created. The models are intended for studying the vehicle’s behavior in full frontal, frontal offset and side impact collisions. These models are suitable for evaluating vehicle performance and occupant safety in a wide variety of impact situations, and are also suitable for part and material substitution studies to support PNGV (Partnership for New Generation of Vehicles) research. The geometry for these models was created by careful scanning and digitizing of the entire vehicle. High degree of detail is captured in the BIW, the front-end components and other areas involved in frontal, frontal offset and side impact on the driver’s side.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950650
Nabih Bedewi, Cing-Dao Kan, Steve Summers, Carl Ragland
This paper describes the results of a study conducted to evaluate the performance and accuracy of a medium size sedan finite element model for off-set car-to-car impacts. This model was originally developed for front impact and does not include side structure compliance. Two tests conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are used for evaluation of the simulations. The overall results indicate that the simulations appear to be consistent with the crash test data. Problems associated with the use of node constraints, lack of side structure model fidelity, and the different integration time marching are identified and solutions for the problems are proposed.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970562
W. Riley Garrott, Paul A. Grygier, Jeffrey P. Chrstos, Gary J. Heydinger, Kamel Salaani, J. Gavin Howe, Dennis A. Guenther
This paper presents an overview of work performed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC) to test, validate, and improve the planned National Advanced Driving Simulator's (NADS) vehicle dynamics simulation. This vehicle dynamics simulation, called NADSdyna, was developed by the University of Iowa's Center for Computer-Aided Design (CCAD) NADSdyna is based upon CCAD's general purpose, real-time, multi-body dynamics software, referred to as the Real-Time Recursive Dynamics (RTRD), supplemented by vehicle dynamics specific submodules VRTC has “beta tested” NADSdyna, making certain that the software both works as computer code and that it correctly models vehicle dynamics. This paper gives an overview of VRTC's beta test work with NADSdyna. The paper explains the methodology used by VRTC to validate NADSdyna.
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