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Viewing 1 to 30 of 144
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1784
Ashley L. Dunn, Gary J. Heydinger, Giorgio Rizzoni, Dennis A. Guenther
This paper discusses the derivation and validation of planar models of articulated vehicles that were developed to analyze jackknife stability on low-μ surfaces. The equations of motion are rigorously derived using Lagrange's method, then linearized for use in state-space models. The models are verified using TruckSim™, a popular nonlinear solid body vehicle dynamics modeling package. The TruckSim™ models were previously verified using extensive on-vehicle experimental data [1, 2]. A three-axle articulated model is expanded to contain five axles to avoid lumping the parameters for the drive and semitrailer tandems. Compromises inherent in using the linearized models are discussed and evaluated. Finally, a nonlinear tire cornering force model is coupled with the 5-axle model, and its ability to simulate a jackknife event is demonstrated. The model is shown to be valid over a wide range of inputs, up to and including loss of control, on low-and-medium-μ surfaces.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1785
Ashley L. (Al) Dunn, Gary J. Heydinger, Giorgio Rizzoni, Dennis A. Guenther
The widely used Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is applied to a planar model of an articulated vehicle to predict jackknifing events. The states of hitch angle and hitch angle rate are estimated using a vehicle model and the available or “measured” states of lateral acceleration and yaw rate from the prime mover. Tuning, performance, and compromises for the EKF in this application are discussed. This application of the EKF is effective in predicting the onset of instability for an articulated vehicle under low-μ and low-load conditions. These conditions have been shown to be most likely to render heavy articulated vehicles vulnerable to jackknife instability. Options for model refinements are also presented.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1228
Jin-Hyuk Lee, Hoon Lee
It is well-known that the hydrodynamic torque converter plays a major role in the transient study of power train systems since it has a great influence on the transient characteristics of a vehicle during gear shifting as well as vehicle launching. To predict accurately the vehicle characteristics, detailed analysis of the hydrodynamic torque converter is required. However, even with the development of a nonlinear dynamic model for the torque converter based on Hrovat and Tobler's paper (1985) is available, it is imperative to calculate both torques from impeller and turbine in order to utilize the dynamic model since it takes torque as an input [3]. In order to obtain the information about necessary but unmeasurable variables, nonlinear model-based estimator is developed using already available and measurable speeds data of impeller and turbine. The hydrodynamic torque converter model includes all necessary dynamics, namely, hydraulic as well as mechanical dynamics.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1072
Mohamed Kamel Salaani, Gary J. Heydinger, Paul A. Grygier
This paper presents the details of the model for the physical steering system used on the National Advanced Driving Simulator. The system is basically a hardware-in-the-loop (steering feedback motor and controls) steering system coupled with the core vehicle dynamics of the simulator. The system's torque control uses cascaded position and velocity feedback and is controlled to provide steering feedback with variable stiffness and dynamic properties. The reference model, which calculates the desired value of the torque, is made of power steering torque, damping function torque, torque from tires, locking limit torque, and driver input torque. The model also provides a unique steering dead-band function that is important for on-center feel. A Simulink model of the hardware/software is presented and analysis of the simulator steering system is provided.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1788
Michael D. Dorohoff, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger
During Phase VI of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) Light Vehicle Rollover Research Program, three of the twenty-six light vehicles tested exhibited significant response asymmetries with respect to left versus right steer maneuvers. This paper investigates possible vehicle asymmetric characteristics and unintended inputs that may cause vehicle asymmetric response. An analysis of the field test data, results from suspension and steering parameter measurements, and a summary of a computer simulation study are also given.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0218
Joe Fuehne, Bill Taylor, Jaesu Kim, J. K. Lee
Catalytic converters are typically constrained and cushioned by an intumescent mat material that is critical to the durability of the ceramic and metallic substrates. In an effort to reduce costs and improve designs, this work attempts to develop and verify a material model for the mat that can be utilized in predictive analysis. Test data are used in conjunction with the finite element program ABAQUS™ to create both a hyperfoam and a user-defined material model. These models will be verified and compared by modelling with ABAQUS the specimens and test conditions used to generate the data.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0219
William Taylor, Joe Fuehne, Richard Lyon, Jaesu Kim, J. K. Lee
Non-linear FEA models are applied to three different catalytic converters, with the objective of predicting structural parameters such as shell deformation, push-out force, and mounting-system contact pressure under various conditions. The FEA modeling technique uses a novel constitutive model of the intumescent mat material typically found in ceramic-monolith converter designs. The mat constitutive model accounts for reversible and irreversible thermal expansion, allowing for the prediction of the one-way converter deflection observed in hot durability tests. In addition to this mat material model, the FEA methodology accounts for elastic and plastic shell deformation, contact between materials, and a three-dimensional temperature field in the shell and mat. For each of three designs, predictions are presented for converter canning, heat-up, and cool-down (i.e., post-heating) conditions.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1188
H. Fred Chen, C. Brian Tanner, Philip H. Cheng, Dennis A. Guenther
In the field of accident reconstruction, there has been a significant amount of effort devoted to the calculation and derivation of vehicle crush energy and vehicle stiffness. Crush energy is usually calculated with a crush profile and crush stiffness. But, oftentimes, crush profiles and/or crush stiffnesses are not available and accident constructionists face the situation of insufficient information. In some such cases, the force balance method can be used to reduce the uncertainty. The method follows from Newton's Third Law, i.e., the impact force exerted on one vehicle is balanced by the force exerted on the other vehicle. With the help of this method, crush profile or crush stiffness can be derived. As a result, the crush energy can then be calculated with improved accuracy. This ultimately increases the accuracy of the overall accident reconstruction. In this paper, examples will be given to illustrate the use of such a methodology.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0394
Gary J. Heydinger, Ronald A. Bixel, David A. Coovert, Kyle M. Brown, Dennis A. Guenther
This paper describes the design and development of the hardware, electronics, and software components of a state-of-the-art automated steering controller, the SEA, Ltd. ASC. The function of the ASC is to input to a vehicle virtually any steering profile with both high accuracy and repeatability. The ASC is designed to input profiles having steering rates and timing that are in excess of the limits of a human driver. The ASC software allows the user to specify steering profiles and select controller settings, including motor controller gains, through user-interface windows. This makes it possible for the test driver to change steering profiles and settings immediately after running any test maneuver. The motor controller used in the ASC offers self-contained signal input, output, and data storage capabilities. Thus, the ASC can operate as a standalone steering machine or it can be incorporated into typical existing, on-vehicle data acquisition systems.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0393
Kyle M. Brown, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther, Ronald A. Bixel
This paper describes an adaptive control strategy for improving the steering response of an automated vehicle steering controller. In order to achieve repeatable dynamic test results, precise steering inputs are necessary. This strategy provides the controller tuning parameters optimized for a particular vehicle's steering system. Having the capability to adaptively tune the steering controller for any vehicle installation provides an easy method for obtaining precise steering inputs for a wide range of vehicles, from small off-road utility vehicles to passenger vehicles to heavy trucks. The S.E.A. Ltd. Automated Steering Controller (ASC) is used exclusively in conducting this research. By recording the torque input to the steering system by the steering controller and the resulting steering angle during only a single test, the ASC is able to characterize the steering system of the test vehicle and create a computer model with appropriate parameters.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0392
James R. Wilde, Gary J. Heydinger, Dennis A. Guenther, Tom Mallin, Andrew M. Devenish
Kinetic Pty Ltd and Tenneco Automotive have developed a passive suspension system called a Kinetic system. The motivation for the design of the system is discussed, and the function of the system is explained. The system improves handling, stability, and ride by passively decoupling roll stiffness from articulation stiffness and roll damping from bounce damping. Improved stability is evaluated by conducting NHTSA's Roll Rate Feedback Fishhook tests on a small SUV equipped with the Kinetic system. Results of the testing are presented, and benefits to rollover are discussed.
2012-10-29
Technical Paper
2012-22-0003
Jason A. Stammen, Rodney Herriott, Yun-Seok Kang, Rebecca Dupaix, John Bolte IV
Anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) should accurately depict head kinematics in crash tests, and thoracic spine properties have been demonstrated to affect those kinematics. To investigate the relationships between thoracic spine system dynamics and upper thoracic kinematics in crash-level scenarios, three adult post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) were tested in both Isolated Segment Manipulation (ISM) and sled configurations. In frontal sled tests, the T6-T8 vertebrae of the PMHS were coupled through a novel fixation technique to a rigid seat to directly measure thoracic spine loading. Mid-thoracic spine and belt loads along with head, spine, and pectoral girdle (PG) displacements were measured in 12 sled tests conducted with the three PMHS (3-pt lap-shoulder belted/unbelted at velocities from 3.8 - 7.0 m/s applied directly through T6-T8).
2013-05-13
Journal Article
2013-01-1886
Rick Dehner, Neil Figurella, Ahmet Selamet, Philip Keller, Michael Becker, Kevin Tallio, Keith Miazgowicz, Robert Wade
The acoustic and performance characteristics of an automotive centrifugal compressor are studied on a steady-flow turbocharger test bench, with the goal of advancing the current understanding of compression system instabilities at the low-flow range. Two different ducting configurations were utilized downstream of the compressor, one with a well-defined plenum (large volume) and the other with minimized (small) volume of compressed air. The present study measured time-resolved oscillations of in-duct and external pressure, along with rotational speed. An orifice flow meter was incorporated to obtain time-averaged mass flow rate. In addition, fast-response thermocouples captured temperature fluctuations in the compressor inlet and exit ducts along with a location near the inducer tips.
2013-05-13
Journal Article
2013-01-1894
Laihang Li, Rajendra Singh
The engine start-up process introduces speed-dependent transient vibration problems in ground vehicle drivelines as the torsional system passes through the critical speeds during the acceleration process. Accordingly, a numerical study is proposed to gain more insights about this transient vibration issue, and the focus is on nonlinear analysis. First, a new nonlinear model of a multi-staged clutch damper is developed and validated by a transient experiment. Second, a simplified nonlinear torsional oscillator model with the multi-staged clutch damper, representing the low frequency dynamics of a typical vehicle driveline, is developed. The flywheel velocity measured during the typical engine start-up process is utilized as an excitation. The envelope function of the speed-dependent response amplification is estimated via the Hilbert transform technique. Finally, the envelope function is effectively utilized to examine the effect of multi-staged clutch damper properties.
2013-05-13
Journal Article
2013-01-1877
Sriram Sundar, Rajendra Singh, Karthik Jayasankaran, Seungbo Kim
This article studies the effects of tooth surface waviness and sliding friction on the dynamics and radiated structure-borne noise of a spur gear pair. This study is conducted using an improved gear dynamics model while taking into account the sliding frictional contact between meshing teeth. An analytical six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) linear time varying (LTV) model is developed to predict system responses and bearing forces. The time varying mesh stiffness is calculated using a gear contact mechanics code. A Coulomb friction model is used to calculate the sliding frictional forces. Experimental measurements of partial pressure to acceleration transfer functions are used to calculate the radiated structure-borne noise level. The roles of various time-varying parameters on gear dynamics are analyzed (for a specific example case), and the predictions from the analytical model are compared with prior literature.
2013-05-13
Journal Article
2013-01-1924
Tan Chai, Rajendra Singh, Jason Dreyer
Fluid filled bushings are commonly used in vehicle suspension and sub-frame systems due to their spectrally-varying and amplitude-dependent properties. Since the literature on this topic is sparse, a controlled laboratory prototype bushing is first designed, constructed, and instrumented. This device provides different internal combination of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements. Experiments with sinusoidal displacement excitations are conducted on the prototype, and dynamic stiffness spectra along with fluid chamber pressure responses are measured. The frequency-dependent properties of several commonly seen hydraulic bushing designs are experimentally studied and compared under two excitation amplitudes. Further, new linear time-invariant models with one long and one short flow passages (in parallel or series) are proposed along with the limiting cases.
2013-05-13
Journal Article
2013-01-1925
Scott Noll, Jason Dreyer, Rajendra Singh
Shaped elastomeric joints such as engine mounts or suspension bushings undergo broadband, multi-axis loading; however, in practice, the elastomeric joint properties are often measured at stepped single frequencies (non-resonant test method). This article helps provide insight into multi-axis properties with new benchmark experiments that are designed to permit direct comparison between system resonant and non-resonant identification methods of the dynamic stiffness matrices of elastomeric joints, including multi-axis (non-diagonal) terms. The joints are constructed with combinations of inclined elastomeric cylinders to control non-diagonal terms in the stiffness matrix. The resonant experiment consists of an elastic metal beam end-supported by elastomeric joints coupling the in-plane transverse and longitudinal beam motion.
2013-05-13
Journal Article
2013-01-1927
Tan Chai, Jason T. Dreyer, Rajendra Singh
Hydraulic bushings are widely used in vehicle applications, such as suspension and sub-frame systems, for motion control and noise and vibration isolation. To study the dynamic properties of such devices, a controlled laboratory bushing prototype is designed and fabricated. This device has the capability of varying different combinations of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements. Transient experiments with step-up and step-down excitations are conducted on the prototype, and the transmitted force responses are measured. The transient properties of several commonly seen hydraulic bushing designs are experimentally studied. Analytical models for bushings with different design features are developed based on the linear system theory. System parameters are then estimated for step responses based on theory and measurements. Finally, the linear models are utilized to analyze the step force measurements, from which some nonlinearities of the bushing system are identified.
2013-05-13
Journal Article
2013-01-1904
Scott Noll, Jason Dreyer, Rajendra Singh
The elastomeric joints (bushings or mounts) in vehicle structural frames are usually described as uncoupled springs (only with diagonal terms) in large scale system models. The off-diagonal terms of an elastomeric joint have been previously ignored as they are often unknown since their properties cannot be measured in a uniaxial elastomer test system. This paper overcomes this deficiency via a scientific study of a laboratory frame that is designed to maintain a high fidelity with real-world vehicle body subframes in terms of natural modes under free boundaries. The steel beam construction of the laboratory frame, with four elastomeric mounts at the corners, permits the development of a highly accurate, yet simple, beam finite element model. This allows for a correlation study between the experiment and model that helps shed light upon the underlying physical phenomenon.
2013-05-13
Technical Paper
2013-01-1907
Jason Dreyer, John Drabison, Jared Liette, Rajendra Singh, Osman Taha Sen
The brake torque variation (BTV) generated due to geometric irregularities in the disc surface is generally accepted as the fundamental source of brake judder; geometric imperfections or waviness in a disc brake caliper system is often quantified as the disc thickness variation (DTV). Prior research has mainly focused on the vibration path(s) and receiver(s), though such approaches grossly simplify the source (frictional contact) dynamics and often ignore caliper dynamics. Reduction of the effective interfacial contact stiffness could theoretically reduce the friction-induced torque given a specific DTV, although this method would severely increase static compliance and fluid volume displacement. An experiment is designed to quantify the effect of disc-pad contact modifications within a floating caliper design on BTV as well as on static compliance.
2015-11-09
Technical Paper
2015-22-0009
Meghan K. Howes, Warren N. Hardy, Amanda M. Agnew, Jason J. Hallman
High-speed biplane x-ray was used to research the kinematics of the small intestine in response to seatbelt loading. Six driver-side 3-point seatbelt simulations were conducted with the lap belt routed superior to the pelvis of six unembalmed human cadavers. Testing was conducted with each cadaver perfused, ventilated, and positioned in a fixed-back configuration with the spine angled 30° from the vertical axis. Four tests were conducted with the cadavers in an inverted position, and two tests were conducted with the cadavers upright. The jejunum was instrumented with radiopaque markers using a minimally-invasive, intraluminal approach without inducing preparation-related damage to the small intestine. Tests were conducted at a target peak lap belt speed of 3 m/s, resulting in peak lap belt loads ranging from 5.4-7.9 kN. Displacement of the radiopaque markers was recorded using high-speed x-ray from two perspectives.
2015-11-09
Technical Paper
2015-22-0017
Kerry A. Danelson, Andrew R. Kemper, Matthew J. Mason, Michael Tegtmeyer, Sean A. Swiatkowski, John H. Bolte IV, Warren N. Hardy
A blast buck (Accelerative Loading Fixture, or ALF) was developed for studying underbody blast events in a laboratory-like setting. It was designed to provide a high-magnitude, high-rate, vertical loading environment for cadaver and dummy testing. It consists of a platform with a reinforcing cage that supports adjustable-height rigid seats for two crew positions. The platform has a heavy frame with a deformable floor insert. Fourteen tests were conducted using fourteen PMHS (post mortem human surrogates) and the Hybrid III ATD (Anthropomorphic Test Device). Tests were conducted at two charge levels: enhanced and mild. The surrogates were tested with and without PPE (Personal Protective Equipment), and in two different postures: nominal (knee angle of 90°) and obtuse (knee angle of 120°). The ALF reproduces damage in the PMHS commensurate with injuries experienced in theater, with the most common damage being to the pelvis and ankle.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0017
Jason Stammen, Kevin Moorhouse, Brian Suntay, Michael Carlson, Yun-Seok Kang
When the Hybrid III 10-year old (HIII-10C) anthropomorphic test device (ATD) was adopted into Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 49 Part 572 as the best available tool for evaluating large belt-positioning booster seats in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 213, NHTSA stated that research activities would continue to improve the performance of the HIII-10C to address biofidelity concerns. A significant part of this effort has been NHTSA’s in-house development of the Large Omnidirectional Child (LODC) ATD. This prototype ATD is comprised of (1) a head with pediatric mass properties, (2) a neck that produces head lag with Z-axis rotation at the atlanto-occipital joint, (3) a flexible thoracic spine, (4) multi-point thoracic deflection measurement capability, (5) skeletal anthropometry representative of a seated child, and (6) an abdomen that can directly measure belt loading.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0171
Ashley L. Dunn, C. Brian Tanner, Rickey L. Stansifer, Sean A. Doyle, Dennis A. Guenther
Following many accidents, one of the involved vehicles is found with partial or total separation of one of its wheels. In many such cases, forensic evidence on the wheel, and/or on some surface struck by the wheel, provide direct evidence that the wheel separation resulted from the impact. However, in some cases such direct evidence is not as obvious or cannot be identified. In those cases, it is often asserted that before the accident occurred one of the involved vehicles might have undergone a sudden loss of control as a result of a spontaneous partial or total wheel separation. This paper examines the response of rear wheel drive vehicles when there is a failure involving a ball joint on the front suspension as the vehicle is traveling along a roadway. The design of the front suspension is analyzed to determine the expected effects of such failure on the wheel geometry and on the interaction between the tires and the pavement.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0160
Grant J. Heydinger, Gregory D. Uhlenhake, Dennis A. Guenther, Ashley L. Dunn
Markings or observable anomalies on vehicle seat belt restraint systems can be classified into two categories: (1) Those caused by collision forces, or “loading marks” and (2) those created by noncollision situations, or “normal usage marks” [1]. A survey was conducted of both crash tested and non-crash tested vehicles in order to collect data on both categories of markings. This paper examines and analyzes the markings caused by both collision and noncollision load scenarios in order to illustrate and evaluate their unique differences as well as provide a general pattern of severity relative to different loading conditions.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0098
Thomas N. Ramsay, Ann Fredelake, Kimberly Stevens
As we continue to create ever-lighter road vehicles, the challenge of balancing weight reduction and structural performance also continues. One of the key parts this occurs on is the hood, where lighter materials (e.g. aluminum) have been used. However, the aerodynamic loads, such as hood lift, are essentially unchanged and are driven by the front fascia and front grille size and styling shape. This paper outlines a combination CFD/FEA prediction method for hood deflection performance at high speeds, by using the surface pressures as boundary conditions for a FEA linear static deflection analysis. Additionally, custom post-processing methods were developed to enhance flow analysis and understanding. This enabled the modification of existing test methods to further improve accuracy to real world conditions. The application of these analytical methods and their correlation with experimental results are discussed in this paper.
2007-08-05
Technical Paper
2007-01-3647
David R. Mikesell, Anmol S. Sidhu, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger, Ronald A. Bixel
Automating road vehicle control can increase the range and reliability of dynamic testing. Some tests, for instance, specify precise steering inputs which human test drivers are only able to approximate, adding uncertainty to the test results. An automated steering system has been developed which is capable of removing these limitations. This system enables any production car or light truck to follow a user-defined path, using global position feedback, or to perform specific steering sequences with excellent repeatability. The system adapts itself to a given vehicle s handling characteristics, and it can be installed and uninstalled quickly without damage or permanent modification to the vehicle.
2007-10-29
Technical Paper
2007-01-4003
Y. He, A. Selamet, R. A. Reese, R. K. Vick, A. A. Amer
The introduction of tumble into the combustion chamber is an effective method of enhancing turbulence intensity prior to ignition, thereby accelerating the burn rates, stabilizing the combustion, and extending the dilution limit. In this study, the primary intake runners are partially blocked to produce different levels of tumble motion in the cylinder during the air induction process. Experiments have been performed with a Chrysler 2.4L 4-valve I4 engine at maximum brake torque timing under two operating conditions: 2.41 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) at 1600 rpm, and 0.78 bar BMEP at 1200 rpm. A method has been developed to quantify the tumble characteristics of blockages under steady flow conditions in a flow laboratory, by using the same cylinder head, intake manifold, and tumble blockages from the engine experiments.
2007-10-29
Technical Paper
2007-01-3992
Y. He, A. Selamet, R. A. Reese, R. K. Vick, A. A. Amer
In-cylinder charge motion is known to significantly increase turbulence intensity, accelerate combustion rate, and reduce cyclic variation. This, in turn, extends the tolerance to exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), while the introduction of EGR results in much lowered nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and reduced fuel consumption. The present study investigates the effect of charge motion in a spark ignition engine on fuel consumption, combustion, and engine-out emissions with stoichiometric and EGR-diluted mixtures under part-load operating conditions. Experiments have been performed with a Chrysler 2.4L 4-valve I4 engine under 2.41 bar brake mean effective pressure at 1600 rpm over a spark range around maximum brake torque timing. The primary intake runners are partially blocked to create different levels of tumble, swirl, and cross-tumble (swumble) motion in the cylinder before ignition.
2009-06-09
Technical Paper
2009-01-2260
Dawn R. Freyder, Brian M. Boggess, Elaine K. Peterman, Douglas R. Morr, William C. Bogatay, John F. Wiechel
During a motor-vehicle collision, an occupant may interact with a variety of interior structures. The material properties and construction of these structures can directly affect the occupant's kinetic response. Simulation tools such as MADYMO (Mathematical Dynamical Models) can be used to estimate the forces imparted to an occupant for injury mechanism and causation evaluation relative to a particular event. Depending on the impact event and the specific injury mechanism being evaluated, the selection of proper material characteristics can be quite important. A comprehensive literature review of MADYMO studies illustrates the prevalent use of generic material characteristics and the need for improved property estimation and implementation methods.
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