Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Affiliation:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 43
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1073
Akira Kikusato, Kusaka Jin, Yasuhiro Daisho
The first objective of this work is to develop a numerical simulation model of the spark ignited (SI) engine combustion, taking into account knock avoidance and heat transfer between in-cylinder gas and combustion chamber wall. Secondly, the model was utilized to investigate the potential of reducing heat losses by applying a heat insulation coating to the combustion chamber wall, thereby improving engine thermal efficiency. A reduction in heat losses is related to important operating factors of improving SI engine thermal efficiency. However, reducing heat losses tends to accompany increased combustion chamber wall temperatures, resulting in the onset of knock in SI engines. Thus, the numerical model was intended to make it possible to investigate the interaction of the heat losses and knock occurrence. The present paper consists of Part 1 and 2.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1066
Akira Kikusato, Katsuya Terahata, Kusaka Jin, Yasuhiro Daisho
Abstract The objective of this work is to develop a numerical simulation model of spark ignited (SI) engine combustion and thereby to investigate the possibility of reducing heat losses and improving thermal efficiency by applying a low thermal conductivity and specific heat material, so-called heat insulation coating, to the combustion chamber wall surface. A reduction in heat loss is very important for improving SI engine thermal efficiency. However, reducing heat losses tends to increase combustion chamber wall temperatures, resulting in the onset of knock in SI engines. Thus, the numerical model made it possible to investigate the interaction of the heat losses and knock occurrence and to optimize spark ignition timing to achieve higher efficiency. Part 2 of this work deals with the investigations on the effects of heat insulation coatings applied to the combustion chamber wall surfaces on heat losses, knock occurrence and thermal efficiency.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0203
Yutaka Murata, Jin Kusaka, Matsuo Odaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Daisuke Kawano, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii, Yuichi Goto
A variable valve timing (VVT) mechanism was applied to achieve premixed diesel combustion at higher load for low emissions and high thermal efficiency in a light duty diesel engine. By means of late intake valve closing (LIVC), compressed gas temperatures near the top dead center are lowered, thereby preventing too early ignition and increasing ignition delay to enhance fuel-air mixing. The variability of effective compression ratio has significant potential for ignition timing control of conventional diesel fuel mixtures. At the same time, the expansion ratio is kept constant to ensure thermal efficiency. Combining the control of LIVC, EGR, supercharging systems and high-pressure fuel injection equipment can simultaneously reduce NOx and smoke. The NOx and smoke suppression mechanism in the premixed diesel combustion was analyzed using the 3D-CFD code combined with detailed chemistry.
2005-05-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2132
Daisuke Kawano, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii, Yuichi Goto, Matsuo Odaka, Yutaka Murata, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is effective for the simultaneous reduction of soot and NOx emissions in diesel engine. In general, high octane number fuels (gasoline components or gaseous fuels) are used for HCCI operation, because these fuels briefly form lean homogeneous mixture because of long ignition delay and high volatility. However, it is necessary to improve injection systems, when these high octane number fuels are used in diesel engine. In addition, the difficulty of controlling auto-ignition timing must be resolved. On the other hand, HCCI using diesel fuel (diesel HCCI) also needs ignition control, because diesel fuel which has a low octane number causes the early ignition before TDC. The purpose of this study is the ignition and combustion control of diesel HCCI. The effects of parameters (injection timing, injection pressure, internal/external EGR, boost pressure, and variable valve timing (VVT)) on the ignition timing of diesel HCCI were investigated.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0100
Ken Naitoh, Takuma Okamoto, Tomoaki Kubota, Kan Yamagishi, Yoshiyuki Nojima, Taro Tamura
An inexpensive, lightweight, and relatively quiet engine reactor that has the potential to achieve thermal efficiency over 50% for small engines was proposed in our previous reports, which is achieved with colliding supermulti-jets that create air insulation to encase burned gas around the chamber center, avoiding contact with the chamber walls and piston surfaces. The colliding of pulse jets can maintain high pressure ratio for various air-fuel ratios, whereas traditional homogeneous compression engines due to piston cannot get high pressure ratio at stoichiometric condition. Emphasis is also placed on the fact that higher compression in this engine results in less combustion noise because of encasing effect. Here, a small prototype engine having supermulti-jets colliding with pulse and strongly-asymmetric double-piston system is examined by using computational experiments. Pulse can be generated by the double piston system of a short stroke of about 40mm.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0099
Ken Naitoh, Daiki Ikoma, Hiroki Sagara, Taro Tamura, Taiki Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki Nojima, Masato Tanaka, Kentaro Kojima, Kenya Hasegawa, Takuya Nakai, Shouhei Nonaka, Tomoaki Kubota
In our previous reports based on computations and fluid dynamic theory, we proposed a new compressive combustion principle for an inexpensive and relatively quiet engine reactor that has the potential to achieve thermal efficiency over 50% even for small combustion chambers having less than 100 cc. This can be achieved with colliding supermulti-jets that create complete air insulation to encase burned gas around the chamber center. We originally developed two small prototype engine systems for gasoline. First one with one rotary valve for pulsating intake flow and sixteen nozzles of jets colliding has no pistons. Next, we developed the second one having a strongly-asymmetric double piston system with the supermulti-jets colliding, although there are no poppet valves. The second prototype engine can vary point-compression strength due to the supermulti-jets and homogeneous compression level due to piston, by changing phase and size of two gears.
2012-09-10
Technical Paper
2012-01-1745
Wataru Matsui, Tetsu Suzuki, Yasuo Ohta, Soichiro Ito, Yo Tanaka, Yutaka Kikuchi, Yasuhiro Daisho, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii
N₂O is known to have a significantly high global warming potential. We measured N₂O emissions in engine-bench tests by changing the NO/NH₃ ratio and exhaust gas temperature at the oxidation catalyst inlet in a heavy-duty diesel engine equipped with a urea SCR (selective catalytic reduction) system. The results showed that the peak N₂O production ratio occurred at an exhaust gas temperature of around 200°C and the maximum value was 84%. Moreover, the N₂O production ratio increased with increasing NO/NH₃. Thus, we concluded that N₂O is produced via the NO branching reaction. Based on our results, two methods were proposed to decrease N₂O formation. At low temperatures ~200°C, NO should be reduced by controlling diesel combustion to lower the contribution of NO to N₂O production. This is essential because the SCR system cannot reduce NOx at low temperatures.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3308
Ryota Nakayama, Tazuki Watanabe, Keishi Takada, Matsuo Odaka, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Urea-SCR system has a high NOx reduction potential in the steady-state diesel engine operation. In complicated transient operations, however, there are certain problems with the urea-SCR system in that NOx reduction performance degrades and adsorbed NH3 would be emitted. Here, optimum urea injection methods and exhaust bypass control to overcome these problems are studied. This exhaust bypass control enables NO/NOx ratio at the inlet of SCR catalyst to be decreased widely, which prevents over production of NO2 at the pre-oxidation catalyst. Steady-state and simple transient engine tests were conducted to clarify NOx reduction characteristics when optimum urea injection pattern and exhaust bypass control were applied. In simple transient test, only the engine load was rapidly changed for obtaining the fundamental knowledge concerning the effect of those techniques.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3442
Kanta Yamamoto, Keishi Takada, Jin Kusaka, Yasuharu Kanno, Makoto Nagata
For diesel emission control systems containing a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) and a Catalyzed Soot Filter (CSF) the DOC is used to oxidize the additional fuel injected into the cylinder and/or the exhaust pipe for the purpose of increasing the CSF inlet temperature during the soot regeneration. Hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation performance of the DOC is affected by HC species as well as a catalyst design, i.e., precious metal species, support materials and additives. How engine-out HC species vary as a function of fuel supply conditions is not well understood. In addition, the relationship between catalyst design and oxidation activity of different hydrocarbon species requires further study. In this study, diesel fuel was supplied by in-cylinder, post injection and exhaust HC species were measured by a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and a gas analyzer. The post injection timing was set to either 73°, 88° or 98° ATDC(after top dead center).
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3435
Takashi Kaminaga, Jin Kusaka
Three types of combustion chamber configurations (Types A, B, and C) with compression ratio lower than that of the baseline were tested for improved performance and exhaust gas emissions from an inline-four-cylinder 1.7-liter common-rail diesel engine manufactured for use with passenger cars. First, three combustion chambers were examined numerically using CFD code. Second, engine tests were conducted by using Type B combustion chamber, which is expected to have the best performance and exhaust gas emissions of all. As a result, 80% of NOx emissions at both low and medium loads at 1500 rpm, the engine speed used frequently in the actual city driving, improved with nearly no degradation in smoke emissions and brake thermal efficiency. It was shown that a large amount of cooled EGR enables NOx-free combustion with long ignition delay.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3440
Akemi Ito, Keiichi Tsuchihashi, Masaaki Nakamura
Clarifying the mechanism of the oil consumption of engines is necessary for developing its estimation method. Oil moves upwards on the piston to the combustion chamber through ring sliding surfaces, ring backs and ring gaps. The mechanisms of oil upwards transport through the ring gaps are hardly analyzed. In this report, oil pressure just under the oil ring was successfully measured by newly developed method to clarify the oil transport mechanism at the ring gap. It was showed that the generated oil pressure pushed up the oil at the ring gap.
2006-11-13
Technical Paper
2006-32-0034
Kenjiro Nakama, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
To suppress knock in small gasoline engines, the coolant flow of a single-cylinder engine was improved by using two methods: a multi-dimensional knock prediction method combining a Flamelet model with a simple chemical kinetics model, and a method for predicting combustion chamber wall temperature based on a thermal fluid calculation that coupled the engine coolant and the engine structure (engine head, cylinder block, and head gasket). Through these calculations as well as the measurement of wall temperatures and the analysis of combustion by experiments, the effects of wall temperature distribution and consequent unburnt gas temperature distribution on knock onset timing and location were examined. Furthermore, a study was made to develop a method for cooling the head side, which was more effective to suppress knock: the head gasket shape was modified to change the coolant flow and thereby improve the distribution of wall temperatures on the head side.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3349
Masaaki Nakamura, Hirotsugu Hayashi, Akemi Ito
The necessity of the reduction of the lubricating oil consumption of diesel engines has been increasing its importance to reduce the negative effect of exhausted oil on after treatment devices for exhausted gas. The final purpose of the studies is clarifying the mechanism of the oil consumption and developing the method of its estimation. For the basic study, the mechanism of oil film generation on the piston skirt could be explained by hydrodynamic lubrication in our first and second reports [1, 2]. In this paper, the piston skirt was calculated using the measured piston motion to clarify the effect of the piston motion to the piston skirt oil film behavior.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3158
Keishi Takada, Futoshi Yoshimura, Yasushi Ohga, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
In this study, we selected four unregulated emissions species, formaldehyde, benzene, 1,3-butadiene and benzo[a]pyrene to research the emission characteristics of these unregulated components experimentally. The engine used was a water-cooled, 8-liter, 6-cylinder, 4-stroke-cycle, turbocharged DI diesel engine with a common rail fuel injection system manufactured for the use of medium-duty trucks, and the fuel used was JIS second-class light gas oil, which is commercially available as diesel fuel. The results of experiments indicate as follows: formaldehyde tends to be emitted under the low load condition, while 1,3-butadiene is emitted at the low engine speed. This is believed to be because 1,3-butadiene decomposes in a short time, and the exhaust gas stays much longer in a cylinder under the low speed condition than under the high engine speed one. Benzene is emitted under the low load condition, as it is easily oxidized in high temperature.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3175
Akinori Morishima, Tomoyuki Narushima, Haruki Moriwaki, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Experimental and numerical studies on PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) and PM (Particulate Matters) formed in the fuel rich mixture have been conducted. In the experiment, neat n-heptane and n-heptane with benzene 25 % by weight were chosen as test fuels. In-cylinder gases produced by the fuel-rich HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) combustion were directly sampled and analyzed by the use of GC/MS (Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectro- metry), and PM emission was also measured by PM sampling system to reveal characteristics of PM formation. Numerical study has been also carried out using a zero dimensional combustion model combined with detailed chemistry. Furthermore, simple surface growth of soot particles was integrated into a detailed chemical kinetic model, and validated with the experimental data.
2003-05-19
Technical Paper
2003-01-1939
Jin Kusaka, Shingo Ito, Norifumi Mizushima, Yasuhiro Daisho, Takeshi Saito
Natural gas pre-mixture is ignited by a small amount of pilot fuel in the dual fuel engine. In this paper, numerical studies were carried out to investigate the combustion and exhaust gas emissions formation process of this engine type by using a multi dimensional model combined with the detailed chemical kinetics including 57 chemical species and 290 elementary reactions. In calculation, the effect of the pre-mixture concentration on combustion was examined. The result indicated that the increased concentration of natural gas could improve the burning fraction and THC, CO emissions due to the increased pre-mixture consumption rate and the cylinders gas temperature.
2003-05-19
Technical Paper
2003-01-1938
Norifumi Mizushima, Shingo Ito, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
A dual fuel natural gas diesel engine suffers from remarkably lower thermal efficiency and higher THC, CO emissions at lower load because of its lower burned mass fraction caused by the lean pre-mixture. To overcome this inevitable disadvantage at lower load, two methods of reducing the number of operating cylinders were examined. One method was to use the two cylinders operation while the second one was to use the quasi-two cylinders operation. As a result, it was found that the unburned hydrocarbons and CO emissions could be favorably reduced with the improvement of thermal efficiency by reducing the number of cylinders to half for a dual fuel natural gas diesel engine. Moreover, it was also found that the quasi-two cylinders operation could improve the torque fluctuation more compared to the two cylinders operation.
2003-05-19
Technical Paper
2003-01-1917
Seang-wock Lee, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
It has been recognized that alternative fuels such as liquid petroleum gas (LPG) has less polluting combustion characteristics than diesel fuel. Direct-injection stratified-charge combustion LPG engines with spark-ignition can potentially replace conventional diesel engines by achieving a more efficient combustion with less pollution. However, there are many unknowns regarding LPG spray mixture formation and combustion in the engine cylinder thus making the development of high-efficiency LPG engines difficult. In this study, LPG was injected into a high pressure and temperature atmosphere inside a constant volume chamber to reproduce the stratification processes in the engine cylinder. The spray was made to hit an impingement wall with a similar profile as a piston bowl. Spray images were taken using the Schlieren and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method to analyze spray penetration and evaporation characteristics.
2008-06-23
Journal Article
2008-01-1637
Keishi Takada, Jin Kusaka
In this study, fuel ignition timing parameters, in-cylinder pressure and heat release rates, and quantities of major exhaust gas emissions from a diesel engine were calculated using multi-dimensional CFD codes coupled with complex chemistry analysis. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of parameters was conducted to identify the major variables affecting these diesel combustion parameters. Firstly, diesel combustion analysis under typical operating conditions was carried out to validate the analytical methods used in the study, and then the effects of intake gas variables (e.g. temperature, and pressure) were investigated in detail in the sensitivity analysis. The results show that the main determinant of ignition timing in the engine is the spatial density of oxygen in the cylinder. This finding indicates that diesel combustion with high EGR and high boost pressure can provide both high thermal efficiency and low emissions.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0140
Daisuke Tanaka, Koji Hiraya, Hirofumi Tsuchida, Hidetoshi Wakasa, Yutaka Murata, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
The aim of this study is to demonstrate the concept of gasoline lift-off spray combustion in which the burning velocity is controlled by the rate of mixture supply to the flame zone. With this concept, gasoline fuel is injected under high pressure to promote atomization, evaporation and mixing with the air, thereby quickly forming a homogenous mixture extending to the flame downstream of the spray. As a result, the injected fuel is burned sequentially. In this study, a constant-volume combustion vessel was used to visualize and analyze spray combustion. The experimental results made clear the effects of the initial conditions (e.g., injection pressure and nozzle hole diameter) and the ambient conditions (e.g., temperature and pressure) on the flame lift-off length and soot formation. In addition, the conditions facilitating this combustion concept were examined by conducting combustion simulations with the KIVA-3V code, taking into account the detailed chemical reaction mechanisms.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0644
Yutaka Murata, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Daisuke Kawano, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii, Yuichi Goto
A variable valve timing (VVT) mechanism has been applied in a high-speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine. The effective compression ratio (εeff) was lowered by means of late intake valve closing (LIVC), while keeping the expansion ratio constant. Premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion, adopting the Miller-cycle, was experimentally realized and numerically analyzed. Significant improvements of NOx and soot emissions were achieved for a wide range of engine speeds and loads, frequently used in a transient mode test. The operating range of the Miller-PCCI combustion has been expanded up to an IMEP of 1.30 MPa.
2007-10-29
Technical Paper
2007-01-3998
Kanta Yamamoto, Keishi Takada, Jin Kusaka, Makoto Nagata
In a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) and Catalyzed Soot Filter (CSF) system, the DOC is used to oxidize additional fuel injected into the cylinder and/or exhaust pipe in order to increase the CSF's inlet temperature during soot regeneration. The catalyst's hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation performance is known to be strongly affected by the HC species present and the catalyst design. However, the engine operating conditions and additive fuel supply parameters also affect the oxidation performance of DOCs, but the effects of these variables have been insufficiently examined. Therefore, in this study, the oxidation performance of a DOC was examined in experiments in which both exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels and exhaust pipe injection parameters were varied. The results were then analyzed and optimal conditions were identified using modeFRONTIER.
2008-09-09
Journal Article
2008-32-0020
Kenjiro Nakama, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
This study examines the effects of ethanol content on engine performances and the knock characteristics in spark ignition gasoline engine under various compression ratio conditions by cylinder pressure analysis, visualization and numerical simulation. The results confirm that increasing the ethanol content provides for greater engine torque and thermal efficiency as a result of the improvement of knock tolerance. It was also confirmed that increasing the compression ratio together with increasing ethanol content is effective to overcome the shortcomings of poor fuel economy caused by the low calorific value of ethanol. Further, the results of one dimensional flame propagation simulation show that ethanol content increase laminar burning velocity. Moreover, the results of visualization by using a bore scope demonstrate that ethanol affects the increase of initial flame propagation speed and thus helps suppress knock.
2008-10-06
Technical Paper
2008-01-2498
Yutaka Murata, Sadahito Tokui, Soichiro Watanabe, Yasuhiro Daisho, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii
A urea SCR system was combined with a DPF system to reduce NOx and PM in a four liters turbocharged with intercooler diesel engine. Significant reduction in NOx was observed at low exhaust gas temperatures by increasing NH3 adsorption quantity in the SCR catalyst. Control logic of the NH3 adsorption quantity for transient operation was developed based on the NH3 adsorption characteristics on the SCR catalyst. It has been shown that NOx can be reduced by 75% at the average SCR inlet gas temperature of 158 deg.C by adopting the NH3 adsorption quantity control in the JE05 Mode.
2015-11-17
Journal Article
2015-32-0715
Beini Zhou, Masahiro Horikoshi, Akira Kikusato, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Kiyotaka Sato, Hidefumi Fujimoto
A mixed time-scale subgrid large eddy simulation was used to simulate mixture formation, combustion and soot formation under the influence of turbulence during diesel engine combustion. To account for the effects of engine wall heat transfer on combustion, the KIVA code's standard wall model was replaced to accommodate more realistic boundary conditions. This were carried out by implementing the non-isothermal wall model of Angelberger et al. with modifications and incorporating the log law from Pope's method to account for the wall surface roughness. Soot and NOx emissions predicted with the new model are compared to experimental data acquired under various EGR conditions.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2334
Kan Yamagishi, Yuichi Onuma, Soichi Ohara, Kenya Hasegawa, Kentaro Kojima, Tomoya Shirai, Takahiro Kihara, Kota Tsuru, Ken Naitoh
Abstract A new engine concept (Fugine) based on colliding pulsed supermulti-jets was proposed in recent years, which is expected to provide high thermal efficiencies over 50% and less combustion noise. Theoretical analyses indicate a high potential for thermal efficiency over 60%. Three types of prototype engines have been developed. The first prototype engine based only on the colliding of pulsed supermulti-jets with fourteen nozzles has no piston compression, while the second type equipped with a low-cost gasoline injector in the suction port has a double piston system and eight jet nozzles. Combustion experiments conducted on the second prototype gasoline engine show high thermal efficiency similar to that of traditional diesel engines and lower combustion noise comparable to that of traditional spark-ignition gasoline engines.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2336
Ken Naitoh, Soichi Ohara, Yuichi Onuma, Kentaro Kojima, Kenya Hasegawa, Tomoya Shirai
Abstract A single-point autoignition gasoline engine (Fugine) proposed by us previously has a strongly asymmetric double piston unit without poppet valves, in which pulsed multi-jets injected from eight suction nozzles collide around the combustion chamber center. Combustion experiments conducted on this engine at a low operating speed of 2000 rpm using gasoline as the test fuel under lean burn conditions showed both high thermal efficiency comparable to that of diesel engines and silent combustion comparable to that of conventional spark-ignition gasoline engines. This gasoline engine was tested with a weak level of point compression generated by negative pressure of about 0.04 MPa and also at an additional mechanical homogeneous compression ratio of about 8:1 without throttle valves. After single-point autoignition, turbulent flame propagation may occur at the later stage of heat release.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2337
Ken Naitoh, Ken Ayukawa, Daiki Ikoma, Takuya Nakai, Susumu Oyanagi, Takuto Kanase, Jumpei Tsuchiya
Abstract Computational and theoretical analyses for a new type of engine (Fugine), which was proposed by us based on the colliding of pulsed supermulti-jets, indicate a potential for very high thermal efficiencies and also less combustion noise. Three types of prototype engines were developed. One of them has a low-cost gasoline injector installed in the suction port and a double piston system in which eight octagonal supermulti-jets are injected and collide. Combustion experiments conducted on the prototype gasoline engine show high thermal efficiency comparable to that of diesel engines and less combustion noise comparable to that of traditional spark-ignition gasoline engines. This paper presents some combustion experiments of one of the other piston-less prototype engines having bi-octagonal pulsed multi-jets injected from fourteen nozzles.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2331
Ken Naitoh, Jumpei Tsuchiya, Daiki Ikoma, Takuya Nakai, Susumu Oyanagi, Takuto Kanase, Takuma Okamoto, Yoshiaki Tanaka, Ken Ayukawa, Remi Konagaya
Abstract In recent years, a new type of engine (Fugine) based on the colliding of pulsed supermulti-jets was proposed by us, which indicates the potential for attaining very high thermal efficiencies and also less combustion noise. A prototype engine with eight nozzles for injecting octagonal pulsed supermulti-jets, which was developed with a low-cost gasoline injector and a double piston system, showed high thermal efficiency comparable to that of diesel engines and also less combustion noise comparable to that of traditional spark-ignition gasoline engines. Another type of prototype piston-less engine having fourteen bioctagonal nozzles was also developed and test results confirmed the occurrence of combustion, albeit it was unstable. In this work, time histories of pressure were measured in the combustion chamber of the piston-less prototype engine under a cold flow condition without combustion in order to examine the compression level obtained with the colliding supermulti-jets.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2168
Masaharu Kassai, Taisuke Shiraishi, Toru Noda, Mamoru Hirabe, Yoshiki Wakabayashi, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Abstract With the development of downsized spark ignition (SI) engines, low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) has been observed more frequently as an abnormal combustion phenomenon, and there is a critical need to solve this issue. It has been acknowledged that LSPI is not directly triggered by autoignition of the fuel, but by some other material with a short ignition delay time. It was previously reported that LSPI can be caused by droplets of lubricant oil intermixed with the fuel. In this work, the ignition behavior of lubricant component containing fuel droplets was experimentally investigated by using a constant volume chamber (CVC) and a rapid compression and expansion machine (RCEM), which enable visualization of the combustion process in the cylinder. Various combinations of fuel compositions for the ambient fuel-air mixture and fractions of base oil/metallic additives/fuel for droplets were tested.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 43

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: