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Viewing 1 to 30 of 739
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2201
Daniel Alberer, Luigi del Re
Transient emission peaks have become an important fraction of the total emissions during the standardized test cycles for passenger car Diesel engines. This paper is concerned with their reduction, in particular of nitric oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, by online receding horizon optimal control. It is based on former works in which alternative target quantities for engine control were proposed, namely in-cylinder oxygen concentrations before (O2,BC) and after combustion (O2,AC). The actual work is concerned with testing an in-cylinder oxygen concentrations based control in simulation as well as by a real-time implementation on a turbocharged common rail passenger car production Diesel engine. The promising results confirm the choice of these concentrations as sensible control references and the feasibility of a real-time use in a model predictive control implementation.
2010-10-25
Journal Article
2010-01-2203
Johan Wahlström, Lars Eriksson
In diesel engines with EGR and VGT, the gas flow dynamics has significant nonlinear effects. This is shown by analyzing DC-gains in different operating points showing that these gains have large variations. To handle these nonlinear effects, a nonlinear state dependent input transformation is investigated. This input transformation is achieved through inversion of the models for EGR-flow and turbine flow. It is shown that the input transformation handles the nonlinear effects and decreases the variations in DC-gains substantially. The input transformation is combined with a new control structure that has a pumping work minimization feature and consists of PID controllers and min/max-selectors for coordinated control of EGR-fraction and oxygen/fuel ratio. The EGR flow and the exhaust manifold pressure are chosen as feedback variables in this structure. Further, the set-points for EGR-fraction and oxygen/fuel ratio are transformed to set-points for the feedback variables.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2210
Withit Chatlatanagulchai, Nitirong Pongpanich, Krisada Wannatong, Shinapat Rhienprayoon
In this paper, we investigate a multivariable control of air path of a diesel-dual-fuel (DDF) engine. The engine is modified from a CI engine by injecting CNG in intake ports. The engine uses CNG as its primary fuel and diesel as its secondary fuel, mainly for initiation of combustion. The modification is economically attractive because CNG has lower price than diesel and the modification cost is minimal. However, for DDF engine, control of the air path becomes more difficult because the engine now has combined characteristics of the CI and the SI engines. The combined characteristics come from the fact that diesel is still directly injected into cylinders (CI engine) while CNG is injected at the intake ports (SI engine.) In pure CI engine, throttle is normally fully opened for maximum air intake, while EGR valve is actively actuated to obtain low emissions. In pure SI engine, however, throttle is an active actuator, driven by pedal.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2211
Fabrizio Ponti, Vittorio Ravaglioli, Davide Moro, Gabriele Serra
Proper design of the combustion phase has always been crucial for Diesel engine control systems. Modern engine control strategies' growing complexity, mainly due to the increasing request to reduce pollutant emissions, requires on-board estimation of a growing number of quantities. In order to feedback a control strategy for optimal combustion positioning, one of the most important parameters to estimate on-board is the angular position where 50% of fuel mass burned over an engine cycle is reached (MFB50), because it provides important information about combustion effectiveness (a key factor, for example, in HCCI combustion control). In modern Diesel engines, injection patterns are designed with many degrees of freedom, such as the position and the duration of each injection, rail pressure or EGR rate. In this work a model of the combustion process has been developed in order to evaluate the energy release within the cylinder as a function of the injection parameters.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2220
Alessandro di Gaeta, Umberto Montanaro, Veniero Giglio
Idle Speed Control plays a crucial role to reduce fuel consumption that turns in both a direct economic benefit for customers and CO\d reduction particularly important to tackle the progressive global environmental warming. Typically, control strategies available in the automotive literature solve the idle speed control problem acting both on the throttle position and the spark advance, while the Air-Fuel Ratio (AFR), that strongly affects the indicated engine torque, is kept at the stoichiometric value for the sake of emission reduction. Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines, working lean and equipped with proper mechanisms to reduce NOx emissions, overcome this limitation allowing the AFR to be used for the idle speed regulation.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0443
Andreas Himmler, Peter Waeltermann, Mina Khoee-Fard
Automotive technology is rapidly changing with electrification of vehicles, driver assistance systems, advanced safety systems etc. This advancement in technology is making the task of validation and verification of embedded software complex and challenging. In addition to the component testing, integration testing imposes even tougher requirements for software testing. To meet these challenges dSPACE is continuously evolving the Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) technology to provide a systematic way to manage this task. The paper presents developments in the HIL hardware technology with latest quad-core processors, FPGA based I/O technology and communication bus systems such as Flexray. Also presented are developments of the software components such as advanced user interfaces, GPS information integration, real-time testing and simulation models. This paper provides a real-world example of implication of integration testing on HIL environment for Chassis Controls.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2478
Richard Boulanger, David Overland
Technologies that facilitate the design and control of complex, hybrid, and resource-constrained systems are examined. This paper focuses on design methodologies, and system architectures, not on specific control methods that may be applied to life support subsystems. It has been estimated that 60–80% of the effort in developing complex control systems is software development, and only 20–40% is control system development [1]. It has also been shown that large software projects have failure rates of as high as 50–65% [2,3]. Concepts discussed include the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and design patterns with the goal of creating a self-improving, self-documenting system design process. Successful architectures for control must not only facilitate hardware to software integration, but must also reconcile continuously changing software with much less frequently changing hardware [4]. These architectures rely on software modules or components to facilitate change.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2457
Jeffery T. Iverson, Thomas M. Crabb, Mark C. Lee, Bill Butrymowicz
Unique challenges arise during the design of temperature and humidity control systems (THCS) for use in microgravity. The design of the Plant Research Unit’s (PRU) THCS builds on the experience gained during the Biomass Production System (BPS) project and extends the understanding of the critical design variables and necessary technical advancements to allow for longer on-orbit operation. Previous systems have been limited by loss of prime, clogging in the porous plates and component reliability. Design of THCSs for long-duration space flight experiments requires the mitigation of these issues as well as a complete understanding of the relevant design variables. In addition to the normal design variables (e.g. mass, power, volume), a complex and interdependent relationship exists between the THCS variables including operational temperature range, operational humidity range, required humidity condensation rate and system air flow.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2433
J. J. Maas, M. J. Mischnick
The CANDS (Circulating, Aeration, and Nutrient Delivery System) Phase II SBIR is currently developing and testing methods and procedures to control moisture, oxygen, and temperature in the root zone of a particulate based micro-gravity nutrient delivery system. The completion of the first year and a half of the CANDS Phase II SBIR has shown significant engineering developments towards environmental control of the root zone. These developments include the measurement of root zone oxygen content, characterization of forced and flood-ebb aeration rates, successful control of root zone moisture using miniature heat-pulse moisture sensors, and successful control of root zone temperature via an insulating/temperature controlling water jacket. At the conclusion of the CANDS Phase II SBIR an integrated root zone environmental control system will be constructed for integration into plant growth systems to eliminate the uncertainties that exist in current plant growth data.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2437
Hiroyuki Miyajima, Tomofumi Hirosaki, Yoshio Ishikawa
A Regenerative Life Support System (RLSS) is a system that establishes self-sustained material recycling and circulation within a space base on the Moon or Mars. This is a large-scale and complicated system comprising a lot of components such as humans, plants and material circulation system. A RLSS contains many factors with uncertainty, such as dynamics of plants and humans, and failure and performance deterioration of devices. In addition, a RLSS is a large-scale and complicated system extending gradually. An environment with uncertainty or a large-scale and complicated system may not be properly addressed by a centralized system. In particular, such a system cannot always gather accurate information in one center in a frequently shifting environment, thus appropriate processing may be difficult. Therefore, we tried autonomous decentralization of information or decision-making using a Multi-Agent System (MAS).
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2439
Theresa Klein, Devika Subramanian, David Kortenkamp, Scott Bell
Advanced life support systems have many interacting processes and limited resources. Controlling and optimizing advanced life support systems presents unique challenges that are addressed in this paper. We have developed a controller using reinforcement learning [Barto&Sutton], which actively explores the space of possible control strategies, guided by rewards from a user specified long term objective function. We evaluated this controller using Biosim, our discrete event simulation of an advanced life support system. This simulation supports all life support modules including crew, food production, air revitalization, water recovery, solid waste incineration and power. Our algorithm for reinforcement learning discovered unobvious strategies for maximizing mission length. By exploiting nonlinearities in the simulation dynamics, the learned controller outperforms a controller designed by an expert.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2441
Sherif Abdelwahed, Jian Wu, Gautam Biswas, John W. Ramirez, Eric J.-Manders
This paper discusses a hierarchical online fault-adaptive control approach for Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems. ALS systems contain a number of complex interacting subsystems. To avoid complexity in the models and online analysis, diagnosis and fault-adaptive control is achieved by local units. To maintain overall performance, the problem of resource management for contending concurrent subsystems has to be addressed. We implement a control structure, where predefined set-point specifications for system operation are used to derive optimizing utility functions for the subsystem controllers. We apply this approach in situations where a fault occurs in a system, and once the fault is isolated and identified, the controllers use the updated system model to derive new set point specifications and utility functions for the faulty system.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2440
Todd M. Quasny, Larry D. Pyeatt
Abstract To make extended space missions, such as missions to Mars, a reality, an advanced life support system (ALS) must be developed that is able to utilize resources to their fullest capabilities [2]. In order to make such a system a reality, a robust control system must be developed that is able to cope with the complexity of an ALS. This work applies reinforcement learning (RL), a machine learning technique, to the task of controlling the water recovery system of a simulated ALS. The RL agent learns an effective control strategy that extends the mission length to the point that lack of water is no longer the cause of mission termination.
2004-11-16
Technical Paper
2004-01-3348
Marcelo R.A.C. Tredinnick, Marcelo Lopes de Oliveira e Souza
In this work we study the stability of digital controls of flexible/Vibratory aerospace/automobile systems by the graph norm technique, occurring in sampled-data control systems due to sampling period variations. To do so, this work tries to establish regions (graphs) of stability and instability in a Banach Space, the distances (norms) between them and a given design to detect analytically and/or numerically its margins of stability or conditions of instability. Based on that, we sketch the first steps for a design methodology of stable digital controllers of flexible/vibratory systems embedded in a sampled-data system with adjustable sampling periods of A/D and D/A converters. A short tutorial about the graph norm technique is also given and some theoretical results as well numerical results are shown. This work was done in two folds to unmask the stability secrets hidden in a general sampled-data control system, until today not revelated.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2359
F. Michard, C. Combes, E. Fournier, E. Werling
In the short term, traditional thermal control techniques, currently reaching their potential limit, will no longer meet the challenge imposed by the natural evolution in electronic packaging, characterized by an ever-increasing level of integration and power. In this context, new architectures must be developed, with thermal control based on high performance heat transfer devices. The Integration of Miniature Heat Pipe (MHP) seems to be one of the most effective and promising solutions for the future. This paper summarizes the work, performed within the frame of a partnership with the CNES, aiming at contributing to develop and evaluate this technology. Beyond theoretical and technological studies, we have manufactured or supplied several miniature heat pipe devices (MHPD) to constitute the elementary thermal control blocks, corresponding to the main packaging hierarchical levels (components, boards, equipment) of future generation of space vocation electronic units.
2013-10-07
Technical Paper
2013-36-0639
Jairo Eduardo Moraes Siqueira, Marcelo Lopes de Oliveira e Souza
The realization of modern systems subjected to automatic control, such as aircraft, automobiles, satellites, rocket launchers, cargo and military ships, and so forth; increasingly assume, within its very set of requirements, the task of providing better dependability, i.e.: safety, reliability, and availability altogether. Towards this demand, fault-tolerant control greatly meets such growing demand of dependability, by its ability of recognizing the occurrence of potentially hazardous/hazardous faults within the overall (closed-loop) system, and by taking remedial action whenever necessary/mandatory. The process of fault tolerance can be segregated into two fundamental steps: (1) that of fault diagnosis, comprising fault detection-isolation-identification, and, (2) control adjustment/reconfiguration. This paper focuses on the second step, of control adjustment/reconfiguration.
2013-10-07
Technical Paper
2013-36-0535
Sérgio Roberto Ferreira Machado, Marcelo Lopes de Oliveira e Souza
The aerospace and automotive electronic systems are getting more complex and/or highly integrated, as defined by ARP 4754A, making extensive use of microelectronics and digital memories which, in turn, operates in higher frequencies and lower voltages. In addition, the aircraft are flying in higher altitudes, and polar routes are getting more frequent. These factors raise the probability of occurrence of hazardous effects like the Single Event Upsets in their embedded electronic systems. These must be designed in a way to tolerate and assure the immunity to the Single Event Upsets, based upon criteria such as reliability, availability and criticality. This paper proposes an overview of an assurance process of immunity of embedded electronic systems to Single Event Upsets caused by ionizing particles by means of a review of literature and an analysis of standards as ECSS-E-ST-10-1, NASA Single Event Effects Criticality Analysis and IEC TS 62396-1.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1006
Lei He, Changfu Zong, Shuang Chen, Chang Wang
In order to solve the reliability and security problems which are caused by the structural alteration of the traditional steering system, the fault-tolerant control method for the Electronic Control Unit of Steer-By-Wire system is studied in this paper. A hardware structure of SBW, with triple cores and dual motors is present. And one triple-loop control system and a triple-core control mechanism which is coordinated by distributed processing mechanism and voting mechanism are proposed too. The communication among steering feeling motor, steering motor and cores is achieved through FlexRay bus. The Hardware-in-loop Simulations test result shows that the reliability and safely of the Electronic Control Unit of Steer-By-Wire system is effectively improved.
1999-10-19
Technical Paper
1999-01-5619
Richard M. Wood, Steven X. S. Bauer
A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (> 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.
2011-10-04
Technical Paper
2011-36-0088
Jairo Eduardo Moraes Siqueira, Marcelo Lopes de Oliveira e Souza
In this work, the problem of fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) for Networked-Control Systems (NCS) of aerospace vehicles is discussed. The concept of fault-tolerance is introduced from a generic structure, and a review on quantitative and qualitative methods (state estimation, parameter estimation, parity space, statistic testing, neural networks, etc.) for FDIR is then performed. Afterwards, the use of networks as loop-closing elements is introduced, followed by a discussion on advantages (flexibility, energy demand, etc.) and challenges (networks effects on performance, closed-loop fault-effects on safety, etc.) represented thereby. Finally, examples of applications on aerospace vehicles illustrate the importance of the discussion herein exposed.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2777
Holger Blasum, Sergey Tverdyshev
DO-178B avionic software safety has been largely based upon the assumption that rigorous development and verification processes are uniformly applied to the entire product (that is typically small or developed from scratch and is extensively tested). On the other hand, security certification by the Common Criteria (CC) traditionally has had also in mind the analysis and gradual improvement of existing systems. For such scenarios, just redoing the entire design is not feasible. This leads to a slightly different emphasis in the presentation of artifacts which is of interest not only in a CC certification context but also when for example reviewing requirement-based descriptions of systems. In cooperation with the DFKI evaluation laboratory, we have drafted a security target instantiating security properties (Security Functional Requirements, SFRs) of the PikeOS separation kernel that has undergone certification for DO-178B.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2805
Maxime Lastera, Eric Alata, Jean Arlat, Yves Deswarte, David Powell, Bertrand Leconte, Cristina Simache
Traditionally, software in avionics has been totally separated from open-world software, in order to avoid any interaction that could corrupt critical on-board systems. However, new aircraft generations need more interaction with off-board systems to offer extended services, which makes these information flows potentially dangerous. In a previous work, we have proposed the use of virtualization to ensure dependability of critical applications despite bidirectional communication between critical on-board systems and untrusted off-board systems. We have developed a test bed to assess the performance impact induced by the use of virtualization. In this work, various configurations have been experimented that range from a basic machine without an OS up to the complete architecture featuring a hypervisor and an OS running in a virtual machine. Several tests (computation, memory, network) are carried out, and timing measures are collected on different hypervisors.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2718
Benjamin Knoblauch, Patricia Best, Vijay Ragothaman, Ravi Pendse
While most industries have already adopted the use of IP networks to exploit the many advantages of network connectivity, the aircraft industry still has not significantly deployed networked devices in the aircraft. Security and reliability are two main concerns that have slowed the transition to this technology. The ability for Air Traffic Control to send digital communications to aircraft could significantly improve the aircraft safety by improving the speed and efficiency of communications. In addition, if devices could offload flight data to servers on the ground for analysis, the accuracy and efficiency of maintenance and other decisions impacting the aircraft could significantly improve. The purpose of this research is to propose an IP-based LAN architecture for the aircraft which provides a scalable solution without jeopardizing flight safety.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2717
Gernot Ladstaetter, Nicolas Reichert, Thomas Obert
Over the last few years, IT systems have quickly found their way onboard aircrafts, driven by the continuous pursuit of improved safety and efficiency in aircraft operation, but also in an attempt to provide the ultimate in-flight experience for passengers. Along with IT systems and communication links came IT security as a new factor in the equation when evaluating and monitoring the operational risk that needs to be managed during the operation of the aircraft. This is mainly due to the fact that security deficiencies can cause services to be unavailable, or even worse, to be exploited by intentional attacks or inadvertent actions. Aircraft manufacturers needed to develop new processes and had to get organized accordingly in order to efficiently and effectively address these new risks.
2011-10-04
Technical Paper
2011-36-0187
Jairo Cavalcanti Amaral, Marcelo Lopes de Oliveira e Souza
Many control systems switch between control modes according to necessity. That is often simpler than designing a full control to all situations. However, this creates new problems, as determining the composed system stability and the transient during switching. The latter, while temporary, may introduce overshooting that degrade performance and damage the plant. This is particularly true for the MultiMission Platform (MMP), a generic service module currently under design at INPE. Its control system can be switched among nine main Modes of Operation and other submodes, according to ground command or information coming from the control system, mainly alarms. It can acquire one and three axis stabilization in generic attitudes, with actuators including magnetotorquers, thrusters and reaction wheels.
2010-10-06
Technical Paper
2010-36-0333
Jairo Cavalcanti Amaral, Marcelo Lopes de Oliveira e Souza
This work presents the analysis, design and simulation of the reconfigurable control architecture for the contingency mode of the MultiMission Platform (MMP). The MMP is a generic service module currently under design at INPE. Its control system can be switched among nine main Modes of Operation and other Sub-Modes, according to ground command or information coming from the control system, mainly alarms. The implementation followed the specifications when they were found, otherwise it was designed. They cover operations from detumbling after launcher separation and solar acquisition, to achieving payload nominal attitude and orbital corrections maneuvers. The manager block of the control system was implemented as a finite state machine. The tests are based in simulations with the MatriX/SystemBuild software. They focused mainly on the worst cases that the satellite is supposed to endure in its mission, be it during modes or transitions between modes and submodes.
2010-10-06
Technical Paper
2010-36-0330
Humberto Manelli Neto, Marcelo Lopes de Oliveira e Souza
On several engineering applications high Reliability is one of the most wanted features. The aspects of Reliability play a key role in design projects of aircraft, spacecraft, automotive, medical, bank systems, and so, avoiding loss of life, property, or costly recalls. The highly reliable systems are designed to work continuously, even upon external threats and internal Failures. Very convenient is the fact that the term 'Failure' may have its meaning tailored to the context of interesting, as its general definition refers to it as "any deviation from the specified behavior of a system". The above-mentioned 'deviation' may refer to: performance degradation, operational misbehavior, deviation of environmental qualification levels, Safety hazards, etc. Nevertheless, Reliability is not the only requirement for a modern system. Other features as Availability, Integrity, Security and Safety are always part of the same technical specification, in a same level of importance.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2392
Jeffery C. Emmerich, Robert C. Richter, Mark C. Lee
High reliability and system flexibility are driving factors in the Plant Research Unit development. Proper selection of the unit electrical and software control architecture is fundamental to achieving these goals. Key features of the PRU control design include the use of a real time operating system for main process control, dynamic power management, a distributed control architecture and subsystem modularity. The chosen approach will allow future modifications and improvements to be incorporated at the subsystem level with minimal impact to the unit overall. Hardware fault tolerance and redundancy enhance system reliability.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2556
J. van Es, G. van Donk, A. Pauw, C.A.M. Rens, J. Jaarsma, M.P.A.M. Brouwer, B. Verlaat
The AMS Tracker Thermal Control System (TTCS) is a two-phase cooling system developed by NIKHEF (The Netherlands), Geneva University (Suisse), INFN Perugia (Italy), Sun Yat Sen University Guangzhou (China) and NLR (The Netherlands). The TTCS is a mechanically pumped two-phase carbon dioxide cooling loop. Main objective is to provide accurate temperature control of AMS Tracker front-end electronics. Additional objective is to prove and qualify a two-phase pumped cooling in orbit and collect operational data in μ-g environment over a period of three years. The paper describes the concept selection, breadboard results and an outlook to the experiments in orbit.
2012-10-02
Technical Paper
2012-36-0378
Jairo Cavalcanti Amaral, Marcelo Lopes de Oliveira e Souza
The Multimission Platform (MMP) is a generic service module currently in Project at INPE. In the 2001 version, its control system can be switched between nine main Operation Modes and other submodes, according to information from satellite sensors and ground commands. The Nominal Mode stabilizes the MMP in three axes and takes it to a nominal attitude, using three reaction wheels. Each wheel has coarse and fine acquisition submodes. The use of multiple modes of control for specific situations frequently is simpler than projecting a single controller for all cases. However, besides being harder to warrant its general stability, the mere switching between these submodes generates bumps, which can reduce the performance and even damage the actuator or plant. In this work, we present an application of diverse methods to smooth the transition between control submodes of the Nominal Mode of the MMP.
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