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Viewing 1 to 30 of 45176
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1644
Greg Uhlenhake, Ahmet Selamet, Kevin Fogarty, Kevin Tallio, Philip Keller
A cold turbocharger test facility was designed and developed at The Ohio State University to measure the performance characteristics under steady state operating conditions, investigate unsteady surge, and acquire acoustic data. A specific turbocharger is used for a thermodynamic analysis to determine the capabilities and limitations of the facility, as well as for the design and construction of the screw compressor, flow control, oil, and compression systems. Two different compression system geometries were incorporated. One system allows compressor performance measurements left of the surge line, while the other incorporates a variable-volume plenum. At the full plenum volume and a specific impeller tip speed, the temporal variation of the compressor inlet and outlet and the plenum pressures as well as the turbocharger speed is presented for stable, mild surge, and deep surge operating points.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1621
Frank Friedrich
While the microcellular urethane is widely known in the automotive industry for its use in jounce bumpers, its use in Noise Vibration Harshness (NVH) applications is often not as well recognized. Even though there are some NVH parts in the market, rubber still dominates it. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the material properties of MCU and their relevance for NVH applications in chassis and suspension components. It will also demonstrate the importance of package design to suit the use of the MCU material. This is especially important to not only achieve the best performance but also keep overall cost and weight under control. Several application types will be introduced with general design suggestions. A detailed design guideline for these applications is not part of this paper. Each application has a large variety of parameters to be considered in the design. They need to be selectively applied based on customer performance targets.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1623
Alan V. Parrett, Chong Wang, Xiandi Zeng, David Nielubowicz, Mark Snowden, Jonathon H. Alexander, Ronald Gerdes, Bill Leeder, Charles Zupan
In recent years several variants of lightweight multi-layered acoustic treatments have been used successfully in vehicles to replace conventional barrier-decoupler interior dash mats. The principle involved is to utilize increased acoustic absorption to offset the decrease in insertion loss from the reduced mass such that equivalent vehicle level performance can be achieved. Typical dual density fibrous constructions consist of a relatively dense cap layer on top of a lofted layer. The density and flow resistivity of these layers are tuned to optimize a balance of insertion loss and absorption performance. Generally these have been found to be very effective with the exception of dash mats with very high insertion loss requirements. This paper describes an alternative treatment which consists of a micro-perforated film top layer and fibrous decoupler layer.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1628
Hejie Lin, Turgay Bengisu, Zissimos Mourelatos
Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR), a copolymer of butadiene and styrene, is widely used in the automotive industry due to its high durability and resistance to abrasion, oils and oxidation. Some of the common applications include tires, vibration isolators, and gaskets, among others. This paper characterizes the dynamic behavior of SBR and discusses the suitability of a visco-elastic model of elastomers, known as the Kelvin model, from a mathematical and physical point of view. An optimization algorithm is used to estimate the parameters of the Kelvin model. The resulting model was shown to produce reasonable approximations of measured dynamic stiffness. The model was also used to calculate the self heating of the elastomer due to energy dissipation by the viscous damping components in the model. Developing such a predictive capability is essential in understanding the dynamic behavior of elastomers considering that their dynamic stiffness can in general depend on temperature.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1629
Saurabh Suresh, Jeff Kastner, Teik Lim
Reduction of noise transmitted through laminated glass with interlayer is of interest to vehicle applications. Altering the structure of the interlayer can impact sound transmission loss particularly at the coincidence frequency. This study investigates the feasibility of including a porous layer within the laminated glass to act as an acoustic damper. To understand the underlying physics controlling transmission loss in laminated glass design, an approach utilizing transfer matrices is used for modeling each layer in the laminated glass. These transfer matrices are used to relate the acoustic characteristics of two points within a layer. For any two layers in contact, an interface matrix is defined that relates the acoustic fields of the layers depending on their individual characteristics. The solid layer is modeled as an elastic element and the sound propagation through the porous materials is described using the Biot theory.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1632
Ion Pelinescu, Andrew Christie
One of the most effective NVH solutions used in the automotive industry to reduce structure-borne noise is to apply vibration damping treatments to the vehicle structure. These damping treatments need to meet increasing weight reduction targets, while offering the same or better damping properties. While Liquid Applied Structural Dampers (LASD) are now delivering high damping performance at lower densities, traditional damping measuring techniques are falling short in describing the performance of these extensional layers when applied onto more realistic test samples or real structures. This paper discusses the damping performance of LASD technology, in particular the newer generations of acrylic-based waterborne LASD materials, which through improvements in polymer architecture are achieving increased damping efficiencies together with reduced density.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1624
Prasanth B, Sachin Wagh, David Hudson
Baffle plates with heat reactive expandable foam sealants have increasingly found their applications in automotives. They are used to separate body cavities and to impede noise, water and dust propagation inside of body cavities, thus control noise intrusion into the passenger compartment. Use of these sealant materials has grown significantly as the demands to improve vehicle acoustic performance has increased. Traditionally quantification of the acoustic performance of expandable baffle samples involved making separate vehicles with and without expandable baffles and measure the incab noise to know the effect. The absolute acoustic evaluation of the baffles is very difficult as number of other vehicle parameters is also responsible for vehicle incab noise. Also, it is a time consuming and a costly method to evaluate.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1625
John G. Cherng, Qian Xi, Pravansu Mohanty, Gordon Ebbitt
Acoustical materials are widely used in automotive vehicles and other industrial applications. Two important parameters namely Sound Transmission Loss (STL) and absorption coefficient are commonly used to evaluate the acoustical performance of these materials. Other parameters, such as insertion loss, noise reduction, and loss factors are also used to judge their performance depending on the application of these materials. A systematic comparative study of STL and absorption coefficient was conducted on various porous acoustical materials. Several dozen materials including needled cotton fiber (shoddy) and foam materials with or without barrier/scrim were investigated. The results of STL and absorption coefficient are presented and compared. As expected, it was found that most of materials are either good in STL or good in absorption. However, some combinations can achieve a balance of performance in both categories.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1626
Jonathan Alexander, David Reed, Ronald Gerdes
Flat, constant thickness composites that consisted of a microperforated top layer plus a fibrous decoupler layer were tested for random absorption and transmission loss (TL) performance. The top, microperforated layer consisted of a relatively thick film that contained small, precise micro-perforations. For reference, top layers that consisted of a resistive scrim and an impervious film were also included in this study. Two fibrous materials of constant thickness were used for the decoupler layer between a steel panel and the top microperforated film. The composites' absorption and TL performance were also modeled using the well-known transfer matrix method. This method has been implemented in a commercially available statistical energy analysis (SEA) software package. A comparison of testing and modeling results showed reasonable agreement for absorption results and even better agreement for transmission loss and insertion loss results.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1627
J. Liu, D. W. Herrin
Microperforated panel (MPP) absorbers are rugged, non-combustible, and do not deteriorate over time. That being the case, they are especially suitable for long term use in harsh environments. However, the acoustic performance is modified when contaminated by dust, dirt, or fluids (i.e. oil, water). This paper examines that effect experimentally and correlates the absorption performance with Maa's theory for micro-perforated panels. Transfer impedance and absorption coefficient are measured for different levels of aluminum oxide and carbon dust accumulation. The amount of dust contamination is quantified by measuring the luminance difference between clean and dirty panels with a light meter. The porosity and hole diameter in Maa's equation are modified to account for dust obstruction. The effect of coating the MPP with oil, water, and other appropriate viscous fluids was also measured. This effect was simulated by modifying the viscous factor in Maa's equation.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1634
Michael Dinsmore, Richard Bliton, Scott Perz
Using advanced, multi-layer poro-elastic acoustical material modeling technologies, an example of acoustical performance optimization of an underhood sound absorber application is presented. In this case, a porous facing in combination with a fibrous sound absorber pad is optimized for maximum efficiency, which allows for dramatic reduction in pad density and weight. Overall sound absorption performance is shown to be equal or improved versus frequency relative to the incumbent design.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1637
Ahad Khezerloo, Amin owhadi Esfahani PhD, Sina Jalily lng
One of important problems in railway transportation systems is control of noise and vibration. Metal foams are very good medias for absorbing noise. So in this paper, noise of motion of a train is simulated by MATLAB software and the reduction of noise level in a compartment of passenger car that is equipped by metal foam sheets is considered. Commonly, the sound absorption coefficients are obtained experimentally and they are available in datasheets and references. The different parameters that influence on the capability of this equipment were considered. For example the microstructure, thickness, magnitude of compaction, relative density and etc of metal foam is effective parameters. High porosity has good effect on the performance of absorber sheet. By increasing of compaction ratio, in frequency domain we will have enhancing of absorption of the noise. Compaction process is done by two different ways: one is direct and else is progressively.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1575
John David Fieldhouse, David Bryant, Chris John Talbot
Thermo-elastic and thermo-plastic behaviour takes place with a disc brake during heavy braking and it is this aspect of braking that this paper considers. The work is concerned with working towards developing design advice that provides uniform heating of the disc, and equally important, even dissipation of heat from the disc blade. The material presented emanates from a combination of modeling, on-vehicle testing but mainly laboratory observations and subsequent investigations. The experimental work makes use of a purpose built high speed brake dynamometer which incorporates the full vehicle suspension for controlled simulation of the brake and vehicle operating conditions. Advanced instrumentation allows dynamic measurement of brake pressure fluctuations, disc surface temperature and discrete vibration measurements.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1527
Rick Dehner, Ahmet Selamet, Philip Keller, Michael Becker
The unsteady surge behavior of a turbocharger compression system is studied computationally by employing a one-dimensional engine simulation code. The system modeled represents a new turbocharger test stand consisting of a compressor inlet duct breathing from ambient, a centrifugal compressor, an exit duct connected to an adjustable-volume plenum, followed by another duct which incorporates a control valve and an orifice flow meter before exhausting to ambient. Characteristics of mild and deep surge are captured as the mass flow rate is reduced below the stability limit, including discrete sound peaks at low frequencies along with their amplitudes in the compressor (downstream) duct and plenum. The predictions are then compared with the experimental results obtained from the cold stand placed in a hemi-anechoic room.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1532
Charlie Teng, Fumin Pan, Jemai Missaoui, Scott Deraad
Turbocharged gasoline engines are typically equipped with a compressor anti-surge valve or CBV (compressor by-pass valve). The purpose of this valve is to release pressurized air between the throttle and the compressor outlet during tip-out maneuvers. At normal operating conditions, the CBV is closed. There are two major CBV mounting configurations. One is to mount the CBV on the AIS system. The other is to mount the CBV directly on the compressor housing, which is called an integrated CBV. For an integrated CBV, at normal operating conditions, it is closed and the enclosed passageway between high pressure side and low pressure side forms a “side-branch” in the compressor inlet side (Figure 12). The cavity modes associated with this “side-branch” could be excited by shear layer flow and result in narrow band flow noises.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1535
Christopher Edward Baker, Homer Rahnejat, Ramin Rahmani PhD, Stephanos Theodossiades
Piston compression rings are thin, incomplete circular structures which are subject to complex motions during a typical 4-stroke internal combustion engine cycle. Ring dynamics comprises its inertial motion relative to the piston, within the confine of its seating groove. There are also elastodynamic modes, such as the ring in-plane motions. A number of modes can be excited, dependent on the net applied force. The latter includes the ring tension and cylinder pressure loading, both of which act outwards on the ring and conform it to the cylinder bore. There is also the radial inward force as the result of ring-bore conjunctional pressure (i.e. contact force). Under transient conditions, the inward and outward forces do not equilibrate, resulting in the small inertial radial motion of the ring.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1550
Wei Sun, Yinong Li, Jingying Huang
Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) has better damping capacity than the conventional Clutch Torsional Damper (CTD), and is more suitable for diesel engine, Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) and hybrid vehicles. Dual Mass Flywheel-Radial Spring (DMF-RS) is a DMF that has a specific structure. In the light of working principal and static analysis, the hard nonlinear torsional stiffness of DMF-RS is derived in this paper, which is very important to a driveline damper. On this basis, a simulation model is developed to analyze the dynamic response of DMF and CTD excited by idle engine; the comparison of the two dampers reveals that the DMF has better damping capacity, high-frequency filter ability and can reduce crankshaft load.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1418
Seongeun Yu, Han Ho Song, Kyoungdoug Min, Hoimyung Choi, Sunghwan Cho, Kyoungchan Han
Emissions regulations are becoming more severe, and they remain a principal issue for vehicle manufacturers. Many engine subsystems and control technologies have been introduced to meet the demands of these regulations. For diesel engines, combustion control is one of the most effective approaches to reducing not only engine exhaust emissions but also cylinder-by-cylinder variation. However, the high cost of the pressure sensor and the complex engine head design for the extra equipment are stressful for the manufacturers. In this paper, a cylinder-pressure-based engine control logic is introduced for a multi-cylinder high speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine. The time for 50% of the mass fraction to burn (MFB50) and the IMEP are valuable for identifying combustion status. These two in-cylinder quantities are measured and applied to the engine control logic.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1417
Bastian Maass, Jiamei Deng, Richard Stobart
More and more stringent emission regulations require advanced control technologies for combustion engines. This goes along with increased monitoring requirements of engine behaviour. In case of emissions behaviour and fuel consumption the actual combustion efficiency is of highest interest. A key parameter of combustion conditions is the in-cylinder pressure during engine cycle. The measurement and detection is difficult and cost intensive. Hence, modelling of in-cylinder conditions is a promising approach for finding optimum control behaviour. However, on-line controller design requires real-time scenarios which are difficult to model and current modelling approaches are either time consuming or inaccurate. This paper presents a new approach of in-cylinder condition prediction. Rather than reconstructing in-cylinder pressure signals from vibration transferred signals through cylinder heads or rods this approach predicts the conditions.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1422
Ying Huang, Fuyuan Yang, Minggao Ouyang, Lin Chen, Xueqing Yang
In-cylinder pressure sensor, which provides the means for precise combustion control to achieve improved fuel economy, lower emissions, higher comfort, additional diagnostic functions etc., is becoming a necessity in future diesel engines, especially for chemical-kinetics dominated PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) or LTC (Low Temperature Combustion) engines. In this paper, new control strategy is investigated to utilize in-cylinder pressure information into engine start process, in order to guarantee the success of engine start and in the meantime prevent penalty of fuel economy or pollutant emissions due to excessive fuel injection. An engine start acceleration model is established to analyze the engine start process. “In-cylinder Combustion Analysis Tool” (i-CAT), is used to acquire and process the in-cylinder pressure data and deliver the combustion indices to ECU (Engine Control Unit). Feedback control is accomplished in ECU based on this information.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1402
Akemi Ito, Keiichi Tsuchihashi, Masaaki Nakamura
Reduction of oil consumption of engines is required to avoid a negative effect on engine after treatment devices. Engines are required fuel economy for reduction of carbon-dioxide emission, and it is known that reduction of piston frictions is effective on fuel economy. However friction reduction of pistons sometimes causes an increase in engine oil consumption. Therefore reduction of engine oil consumption becomes important subject recently. The ultimate goal of this study is developing the estimation method of oil consumption, and the mechanism of oil upward transport at oil ring gap was investigated in this paper. Oil pressure under the oil ring lower rail was measured by newly developed apparatus. It was found that the piston slap motion and piston up and down motion affected oil pressure rise under the oil ring and oil was spouted through ring-gap by the pressure. The effect of the piston design on the oil pressure generation was also investigated.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1400
Emin Yusuf Avan, Robin Mills, Rob Dwyer-Joyce
An essential part of the total parasitic loss in an IC engine is due to the piston ring and liner friction. In this work, a piston ring-liner reciprocating test rig combined with ultrasonic film thickness measurement system was used to understand frictional characteristic of the lubricant that formed in the contact. Two test procedures were carried out for two lubricants with different viscosities. These procedures were a step load increment at a constant speed and a step speed increment at a constant load. The results showed that the piston ring-liner contact was in boundary lubrication regime for low operating speeds at high load. This was consistent with the oil film thickness data. However, mixed lubrication regime was observed for high operating speeds at low loads. The lubricant film thicknesses increased with speed and decreased with load.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1404
Tao Xu, Sheng-Jaw Hwang, Chung-Yao Tang, Mikhail Ejakov, Michael King
A successful piston design requires eliminate the following failure modes: structure failure, skirt scuffing and piston unusual noise. It also needs to deliver least friction to improve engine fuel economy and performance. Traditional approach of using hardware tests to validate piston design is technically difficult, costly and time consuming. This paper presents an up-front CAE tool and an analytical process that can systematically address these issues in a timely and cost-effectively way. This paper first describes this newly developed CAE process, the 3D virtual modeling and simulation tools used in Ford Motor Company, as well as the piston design factors and boundary conditions. Furthermore, following the definition of the piston design assessment criteria, several piston design studies and applications are discussed, which were used to eliminate skirt scuffing, reduce piston structure dynamic stresses, minimize skirt friction and piston slapping noise.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1407
Fanghui Shi
Presented in the paper is a comprehensive analysis for floating piston pin. It is more challenging because it is a special type of journal bearing where the rotation of the journal is coupled with the friction between the journal and the bearing. In this analysis, the multi-degree freedom mass-conserving mixed-EHD equations are solved to determine the coupled pin rotation and friction. Other bearing characteristics, such as minimum film thickness, pin secondary motions in both connecting-rod small-end bearing and piston pin-boss bearing, power loss etc are also determined. The mechanism for floating pin to have better scuffing resistance is discovered. The theoretical and numerical model is implemented in the GM internal software FLARE (Friction and Lubrication Analysis for Reciprocating Engines).
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1401
Yoolkoo Kim, Hyundal Park, Jeong Uk An, Tae-Suek Kan, Joonsung Park
Various polymer-based coatings are applied on piston skirt to reduce friction loss between the piston skirt and cylinder bore which is one of main factors of energy loss in an automotive engine system. These coatings generally consist of polymer binder (PAI) and solid lubricants (graphite or MoS₂) for low friction property. On the other hand, the present study found that PTFE as a solid lubricant and nano diamond as hard particles can be used to improve the low friction and wear resistance simultaneously. In the process of producing coating material, diamond particles pulverized to a nano size tend to agglomerate. To prevent this, silane (silicon coupling agent) treatment was applied. The inorganic functional groups of silane are attached to the nano diamond surface, which keep the diamond particles are apart.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1405
Pranay Nagar, Scott Miers
Engine friction serves as an important domain for study and research in the field of internal combustion engines. Research shows that friction between the piston and cylinder accounts for almost 20% of the losses in an engine and therefore any effort to minimize friction losses will have an immediate impact on engine efficiency and thus vehicle fuel economy. The two most common methods to experimentally measure engine friction are the floating liner method and the instantaneous indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) method. This paper provides a detailed review of the IMEP method, presents major findings, and discusses sources of error. Although the instantaneous IMEP method is relatively new compared to the floating liner method, it has been used by many scientists and engineers for calculating piston ring assembly friction with consistent results.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1406
Mahesh Puthiya Veettil, Fanghui Shi
The oil consumption and blow-by are complex phenomena that need to be minimized to meet the ever changing modern emission standards. Oil flows from the sump to the combustion chamber and the blow-by gases flow from the combustion chamber to the crank case. There are several piston rings on the piston, which form a ring-pack. The ring pack has to be efficiently designed to minimize the oil consumption and blow-by. Since it is difficult and extremely costly to conduct experiments on every series of engines to check for the blow-by and oil consumption, a CFD analysis can be performed on the ring pack to study the blow-by and oil-consumption characteristics. In the CFD analysis described here, the region considered is between the compression chamber and the skirt, between the piston (including the rings) and the cylinder liner. The 3D CFD analysis was conducted for the engine running conditions of 5000 rpm and load of 13.5 kPa, for a 2.4L gasoline engine.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1724
Juliette Florentin, Francois Durieux, Yukihisa Kuriyama, Toyoki Yamamoto
The present work attempts a complete noise and vibration analysis for an electric vehicle at concept stage. The candidate vehicle is the Future Steel Vehicle (FSV), a lightweight steel body with an electric motor developed by WorldAutoSteel [1,2,3]. Measurements were conducted on two small Mitsubishi vehicles that both share the same body, yet one is equipped with an internal combustion engine and the other with an electric motor. The outcome was used as a starting point to identify assets and pitfalls of electric motor noise and draw a set of Noise Vibration and Harshness (NVH) targets for FSV. Compared to a combustion engine, the electric motor shows significantly lower sound pressure levels, except for an isolated high frequency peak heard at high speeds (3500 Hz when the vehicle drives at top speed). The prominence of this peak is lowered by increased use of acoustic absorbent materials in the motor compartment.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-1765
Haifeng Liu, Peng Zhang, Zheming Li, Zunqing Zheng, Mingfa Yao, Xuan Feng
The influence of different combustion chamber configuration, intake temperature, and coolant temperature on HCCI combustion processes were investigated in a single-cylinder optical engine. Two-dimensional images of the chemiluminescence were captured using an intensified CCD camera in order to understand the spatial distribution of the combustion. N-heptane was used as the test fuel. Three combustion chamber geometries with different squish lip, salient, orthogonal, reentrant shape, referred as V-type, H-type, and A-type respectively, were used in this study. Intake temperature was set to 65°C and 95°C, while coolant temperature was set to 85°C. The experimental data consisting of the in-cylinder pressure, heat release rate, chemiluminescence images all indicated that the different combustion chamber geometries result in different turbulence intensity in the combustion chamber, and thus affect the auto-ignition timing, chemiluminescence intensity, and combustion processes.
2011-08-30
Journal Article
2011-01-1766
Tatsuya Kuboyama, Yasuo Moriyoshi, Koichi Hatamura, Junichi Takanashi, Yasuhiro Urata, Toshio Yamada
To extend the operating range of a gasoline HCCI engine, the blowdown supercharging (BDSC) system and the EGR guide were developed and experimentally examined. The concepts of these techniques are to obtain a large amount of dilution gas and to generate a strong in-cylinder thermal stratification without an external supercharger for extending the upper load limit of HCCI operation whilst keeping dP/dθmax and NOx emissions low. Also, to attain stable HCCI operation using the BDSC system with wide operating conditions, the valve actuation strategy in which the amount of dilution gas is smaller at lower load and larger at higher load was proposed. Additionally to achieve multi-cylinder HCCI operation with wide operating range, the secondary air injection system was developed to reduce cylinder-to-cylinder variation in ignition timing. As a result, the acceptable HCCI operation could be achieved with wide operating range, from IMEP of 135 kPa to 580 kPa.
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