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2015-08-18 ...
  • August 18-19, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • November 2-3, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized.
2015-08-03 ...
  • August 3-4, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Lubricating fluids are the lifeblood of modern engines, performing numerous vital functions from reducing system friction, temperature, and fuel consumption to minimizing tailpipe emissions. This comprehensive seminar covers the latest developments in lubricating fluids technologies and explores the relationships between lubricating fluids and emissions, after-treatment devices, bio-fuels, and fuel economy. Fundamentals of crankcase lubrication, including the properties and performance requirements of global base stocks and lubricants will be covered.
2015-05-15
Book
This is the electronic format of the Journal.
2015-04-21
Event
The industry continues to work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with engine hardware in order to improve vehicle efficiency, durability, and performance. The Engine Lubricants Session presents a variety of papers dealing with advances in engine oils and their relationship to improved hardware performance.
2015-04-15
Book
This is the electronic format of the Journal.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0755
Yasuo Moriyoshi, Toshio Yamada, Daisuke Tsunoda, Mingzhao Xie, Tatsuya Kuboyama, Koji Morikawa
Abstract The authors investigated the reasons of how a preignition occurs in a highly boosted gasoline engine. Based on the authors' experimental results, theoretical investigations on the processes of how a particle of oil or solid comes out into the cylinder and how a preignition occurs from the particle. As a result, many factors, such as the in-cylinder temperature, the pressure, the equivalence ratio and the component of additives in the lubricating oil were found to affect the processes. Especially, CaCO3 included in an oil as an additive may be changed to CaO by heating during the expansion and exhaust strokes. Thereafter, CaO will be converted into CaCO3 again by absorbing CO2 during the intake and compression strokes. As this change is an exothermic reaction, the temperature of CaCO3 particle increases over 1000K of the chemical equilibrium temperature determined by the CO2 partial pressure.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0966
Sauhard Singh, Anil Bhardwaj, Reji Mathai, A K Sehgal, R Suresh, B P Das, Nishant Tyagi, Jaywant Mohite, N B Chougule
Abstract The ever increasing demand of fuels for vehicles can only be met by use of alternate fuels like Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Hydrogen (H2). The 18 percent hydrogen enriched CNG fuel referred to as HCNG has the potential to lower emissions and is considered to be the first step towards promotion of a Hydrogen economy. While, automotive industry matures up with the usage of new engines, lubricant manufacturers are also moving on to the next stage by formulating oils to be used in gas engines such as CNG, HCNG etc. This paper presents the evaluation of gas engine oil on 6-cylinder heavy duty CNG engine using HCNG. The six cylinder engine was chosen due to its importance for urban bus transportation. The engine was optimized for using HCNG fuel. Initial performance of the engine using HCNG was compared vis-à-vis CNG and, thereafter, the engine was subjected to endurance test of 500 hours as per 8 mode engine simulated driving cycle.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1285
Dingfeng Deng, Fanghui Shi, Louis Begin, Isaac Du
Several instances have occurred where the outer surface of turbocharger fully floating journal bearing bushings have exhibited damage from oil debris resulting in loud constant tone noises and subsequent warranty claims. This paper studies the effect of oil debris in Turbocharger journal bearings on Subsynchronous NVH. A CFD model is built to study the behavior of oil debris particles with different sizes. The oil debris particles tend to navigate to the inner film or outer film of bearing bushing depending on the drag and centrifugal forces. It is found that the dominant centrifugal forces prevent larger particles from reaching the inner film while smaller particles travel more easily to the inner film. It is also found that the turbine side is more likely to become damaged from debris than the compressor side bearing due to higher temperatures. A tribology analysis is executed to determine the effect of oil debris particles on the speed ratio of the bearing bushing to the shaft.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0683
Jiman Han, Qian Zou, Gary Barber, Xichen Sun
Abstract This paper describes the scuffing tests performed to understand the effect of surface roughness and lubrication on scuffing behavior for austempered ductile iron (ADI) material. As the scuffing tendency is increased, metal-to-metal interaction between contacting surfaces is increased. Lubrication between sliding surfaces becomes the boundary or mixed lubrication condition. Oil film breakdown leads to scuffing failure with the critical load. Hence, the role of surface roughness and lubrication becomes prominent in scuffing study. There are some studies in which the influence of the surface roughness and lubrication on scuffing was evaluated. However, no comprehensive scuffing study has been found in the literature regarding the effect of surface roughness and lubrication on scuffing behavior of ADI material. The current research took into account the inferences of surface roughness and lubrication on scuffing for ADI.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0684
Sarah M. Lundgren, Katja Eriksson, Brenda Rossenaar
Abstract For years amine surfactants, such as primary amines, ethoxylated amines and polyamines, have been used as friction modifiers in lubricating oils in order to improve fuel economy. This paper describes how the friction performance of amine containing lubricating oils can be improved with the addition of a small amount of molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC). Three fatty amines, tallow amine (Armeen® T), tallow propanediamine (Duomeen® T) and tallow dipropylenetriamine (Triameen® T), have been tested with Zinc Dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) and with and without MoDTC in the Minitraction machine (MTM). It is shown that MoDTC improves the friction of Duomeen T and Triameen T while not for Armeen T. It is argued that the packing of Armeen T does not allow MoDTC to reach the surface and to create molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) sheets. Duomeen T and Triameen T have more nitrogen atoms and cannot pack as closely at the surface as Armeen T which allow MoS2 sheets to form.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0753
Max Magar, Ulrich Spicher, Stefan Palaveev, Marcus Gohl, Gunther Müller, Christian Lensch-Franzen, Jens Hadler
Abstract In the present paper the results of a set of experimental investigations on LSPI are discussed. The ignition system of a test engine was modified to enable random spark advance in one of the four cylinders. LSPI sequences were successfully triggered and exhibited similar characteristics compared to regularly occurring pre-ignition. Optical investigations applying a high speed camera system enabling a visualization of the combustion process were performed. In a second engine the influence of the physical properties of the considered lubricant on the LSPI frequency was analyzed. In addition different piston ring assemblies have been tested. Moreover an online acquisition of the unburned hydrocarbon emissions in the exhaust gas was performed. The combination of these experimental techniques in the present study provided further insights on the development of LSPI sequences.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0967
Tingjun Hu, Ho Teng, Xuwei Luo, Bin Chen
Abstract Turbocharged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engines often have a flat torque curve with the maximum torque covering a wide range of engine speeds. Increasing the high-speed-end torque for a TGDI engine provides better acceleration performance to the vehicle powered by the engine. However, it also requires more fuel deliveries and thus longer injection durations at high engine speeds, for which the multiple fuel injections per cycle may not be possible. In this study, results are reported of an experimental investigation of impact of fuel injection on dilution of the crankcase oil for a highly-boosted TGDI engine. It was found in the tests that the high-speed-end torque for the TGDI engine had a significant influence on fuel dilution: longer injection durations resulted in impingement of large liquid fuel drops on the piston top, leading to a considerable level of fuel dilution.
2015-04-07
Magazine
GM’s CTO driving new paths to technology leadership 'We’re making actual production commitments regarding our advanced-technology strategy, rather than just talking about it,' says GM’s CTO Jon Lauckner. 'We’re absolutely going to be among the leaders, if not the leader, in these areas.' Aluminum prepares for its next big leap Ford’s F-Series blockbuster was just the beginning. New micromills now in pilot phase aim to bring vastly stronger and more formable light-alloy materials at higher capacity, says Alcoa’s Mike Murphy. Slick solutions for friction reduction From new lubricants to ‘smart’ oil pumps and clever bearing technologies, engine designers are attacking every potential source of spin losses and internal friction in the quest for more mechanical work out of less fuel. Next-gen NSX: a twin-turbo, multi-material Ferrari-fighter The production NSX made its much-awaited global debut at NAIAS in January.
2015-03-17
Event
2015-03-17
Event
2015-03-16
Event
2015-02-18
Standard
J1423_201502
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed cooperatively by SAE, ASTM, and API to define and identify Energy Conserving or Resource Conserving engine oils for passenger cars, vans, sport utility vehicles, and light-duty (3856 kg [8500 lb] GVW or less) trucks.
2015-01-22
WIP Standard
ARP5996C
This method is designed to evaluate the coking propensity of synthetic ester-based aviation lubricants under single phase flow conditions found in certain parts of gas turbine engines, for instance in bearing feed tubes. This method is applicable to lubricants with a coking propensity, as determined by this method, falling in the range 0.01 to 3.00 mg.
2015-01-20
Standard
J300_201501
This SAE Standard defines the limits for a classification of engine lubricating oils in rheological terms only. Other oil characteristics are not considered or included.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0064
Asmita Manwatkar, Prasad S Phale, Moqtik Ashok Bawase, Mangesh Ramesh Saraf
Abstract Used oil analysis plays an important role in the field of engine development, considering that it can give brief idea about performance of lubricant/ oil being used, its compatibility with the system under considerations. At present, regular testing is done like elemental analysis using Inductive Coupled Plasma (ICP) which can give idea about wear elements and additive elements. But it does not give information on morphological characterization of particles. In present work, Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy technique with EDAX detector is used for characterizing the used oil. Oil is filtered on suitable paper and the particles collected on paper are analyzed. This gives the information on morphology and size of particles, their elemental analysis and mapping so that the sources can be judged. Size of wear metal particle is very important factor as even few bigger size particles are more detrimental than large number of smaller particles.
2015-01-09
WIP Standard
AS5780C
This specification defines basic physical, chemical, and performance limits for 5 cSt grades of gas turbine engine lubricating oils used in aero and aero-derived marine and industrial applications, along with standard test methods and requirements for laboratories performing them. It also defines the quality control requirements to assure batch conformance and materials traceability, and the procedures to manage and communicate changes in oil formulation and brand. This specification invokes the Performance Review Institute (PRI) product qualification process. Requests for submittal information may be made to the PRI at the address in Appendix C, referencing this specification. Products qualified to this specification are listed on a Qualified Products List (QPL) managed by the PRI. Additional tests and evaluations may be required by individual equipment builders before an oil is approved for use in their equipment.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3767

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