Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 3843
2016-10-24
Event
The industry continues to work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with engine hardware in order to improve vehicle efficiency, durability, and performance. The Engine Lubricants Session presents a variety of papers dealing with advances in engine oils and their relationship to improved hardware performance.
2016-10-24
Event
This session reviews advancements in heavy-duty engine oil technology and test methodology, focusing on achieving future emissions, durability and fuel efficiency expectations both in North America and Europe.
2016-10-24
Event
In the industry there is continuing work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with driveline hardware and on improving the fluids used in these applications. In this session are presented a variety of papers dealing with different applications where the interaction of driveline fluids with equipment is important.
2016-04-25 ...
  • April 25-26, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • October 27-28, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Baltimore, Maryland
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized.
2016-04-13
Event
In the industry there is continuing work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with driveline hardware and on improving the fluids used in these applications. In this session are presented a variety of papers dealing with different applications where the interaction of driveline fluids with equipment is important.
2016-04-13
Event
This session reviews advancements in heavy-duty engine oil technology and test methodology, focusing on achieving future emissions, durability and fuel efficiency expectations both in North America and Europe.
2016-04-12
Event
The industry continues to work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with engine hardware in order to improve vehicle efficiency, durability, and performance. The Engine Lubricants Session presents a variety of papers dealing with advances in engine oils and their relationship to improved hardware performance.
2016-04-12
Event
The industry continues to work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with engine hardware in order to improve vehicle efficiency, durability, and performance. The Engine Lubricants Session presents a variety of papers dealing with advances in engine oils and their relationship to improved hardware performance.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1132
Eduardo Mondragon-Parra, Gregory Ambrose
The required Fuel Economy improvement to meet increasing CAFE standards and the global trend to reduce CO2 emissions has prompted automakers to look at new technologies and optimize current technologies. One area of focus is the reduction of mechanical energy losses in driveline systems, which translate to less fuel consumption. Even though the driveline and chassis components account for only 2% (approximately) of the total mechanical losses in passenger vehicles, automakers have shown interest in maximizing the mechanical efficiency of driveline systems. A key component of any driveline system is the Halfshaft (HS), consisting of two Constant Velocity Joints (CVJ’s). The efficiency of CVJ’s is dependent on the joint architecture, angle of operation, transmitted torque, rotational speed and the grease selected for lubrication. Premium Tripots have the highest mechanical efficiency among CVJ’s. Balltype joints (i.e. fixed joints) tend to have lower efficiency.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0422
Robert A. Smith, Christopher Rudzinskas
“Molecular Analysis of Automotive Electrical Components Contaminated with Engine and Powertrain Performance Fluids” Robert A. Smith and Christopher R. Rudzinskas, Advanced Materials Group, Delphi Electrical/Electronic Architecture, Warren, Ohio Increased government regulations for increased fuel efficiency to combat rising fuel costs and environmental concerns has led to marked reduction in the size of cars. Automobile downsizing has reduced engine compartment volumes - decreasing separation of polymeric electrical components from fluid accesses and reservoirs and increasing the risks of spillage onto the components. The spatial separation has been reduced even further with trends toward high performance turbo-charged engines with enhanced automotive performance. Once contaminated, the polymeric component is then exposed to heating, due to engine performance, which could exacerbate fluid contamination into the interior of the part through imbibition into amorphous regions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0999
Yuesen Wang, Xingyu Liang, Ge-Qun Shu, lihui dong, Hanzhengnan Yu, Yajun Wang, Zhijun Li
In this paper, the influence of sulfur and ash fraction in lubricating oil on particle emissions was investigated via experimental works. Especially, we focus on the characterizations like size distribution, morphology and elements fraction in diesel particles. All of the research was done on a two-cylinder diesel engine under different load conditions. Five kinds of lubricating oils with different levels of sulfur and ash fraction were used in this study, among which a kind of 5W-30 (Castrol ACEA, C1) oil was used as baseline. Diesel particles were collected by thermophoretic system and filter, and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrum technique, respectively. Conclusions drawn from the experiments suggest that the sulfur and ash change the particle emissions directly. Both the sulfur and ash fraction in oil increase the amount of particles with large diameter and shift the size distribution to large size area.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1044
Toshiaki Kobayashi
A new method of predicting piston-skirt scuffing has been developed. The authors previously developed a method of predicting piston-slap noise and piston-skirt friction using a three-dimensional piston motion simulation. Those papers were published. In this simulation, the product of piston-skirt surface pressure and piston speed is integrated for one cycle, and the value obtained is used as an indicator for evaluation of piston-skirt wear. However, the fact that scuffing resulting in erosion of the piston skirts sometimes occurred even when this value was low called its effectiveness as an indicator for the evaluation of scuffing into question. This paper discusses a method of prediction of scuffing of the piston skirts in passenger car internal combustion engines. The authors conducted tests of actual internal combustion engines using several different types of pistons in order to study the status of occurrence of scuffing.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1025
Daniela Cempirkova, Rostislav Hadas, Lukáš Matějovský, Rolf Sauerstein, Matthias Ruh
As emission regulations tighten across various regions of the world there is a growing trend in the use of alternative fuels such as Ethanol being blended with Gasoline. A notable case of Ethanol usage is found in South America with the widespread use of E100, which has no gasoline content and can often contain up to 10% water. Engine oil contamination by fuel is of major concern and under certain conditions can have negative effects on the durability of Turbocharger components which come into contact with contaminated oil, particularly sliding bearings, but also compressor wheels. The manner in which this effect takes hold can cause a decrease in the lubrication properties of the engine oil as well as a corrosiveness.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0899
Takashi Hoshino, Farrukh Qureshi, Nicholas Virostko, Elizabeth Schiferl, Ananda Gajanayake, Motoji Hiroki, Tomoya Higuchi, Keita Ishizaki
The growing need for improved fuel economy is a global challenge due to continuously tightening environmental regulations targeting lower CO2 emission levels via reduced fuel consumption in vehicles. In order to reach these fuel efficiency targets, it necessitates improvements in hardware by applying advanced technologies in design, materials and surface treatments etc., as well as matching lubricant formulations with appropriate chemistry in. Axle lubricants have a significant impact on fuel economy. Importantly, they can be tailored to deliver maximum operation efficiency over either specific or wide ranges of operating conditions. The proper lubricant technology with well-balanced chemistries can simultaneously realize both fuel economy and hardware protection, which are commonly known to be having a trade-off relationship.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0484
Chad W. Chichester
Silicone fluids are known to have high Viscosity Indices (VI), and high Oxidation Onset Temperatures (OOT). Silicone VI and OOT characteristics make those fluids appealing for use as lubricants in high temperature applications, and where lubricant longevity is desired. Despite thermal and oxidative benefits, silicones lubricants have a reputation as being poor lubricants in metal-to-metal applications, and are typically only selected for use in plastic applications. Most industrial knowledge about silicone lubricants is based on characteristics of PolyDiMethyl Siloxanes (PDMS), in which case, lubricity limitations do exists. However, there are other silicone based lubricating fluid technologies, that have been commercially available for decades, that far exceed known lubricity performance of PDMS, and in some ways can rival traditional synthetic hydrocarbon.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0494
Masashi Sadatomi, Hiroaki Ito
1. Introduction In recent years, measures such as improving combustion efficiency, downsizing, installing stop-start systems, and reducing friction have been applied to engines to satisfy the requirements for reducing fuel consumption and emissions in commercial vehicles. Downsizing, for example, is effective at reducing friction loss at identical levels of engine torque. However, the internal pressure of the cylinder increases within a lower rotation range than in conventional engines, making reliability improvements an important issue, especially around the bearings. 2. Summary In this study the oil film thickness of main bearings for multicylinder diesel engines was measured, and the data was analyzed using the response surface method, which is one of the statistical analysis methods used to quantitatively derive the factors affecting the oil film thickness and its contribution. 3.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0898
Sujay Bagi, Rick Bowker, Rob Andrew
Current and future diesel engine oil categories have specifications that impose limits on SAPS (Sulfated Ash, Phosphorous and Sulfur) levels that help to minimize accumulation of ash in the DPF originating from oil consumption in the engine. Metallic species in the oil formulation, mostly from detergents and anti-wear additives, have a significant impact on ash behavior when subjected to high temperatures during active regeneration of the filter. Certain compounds in the oil, especially derivatives of ZDDP (Zinc Dialkyl Dithiophosphate), interact with filter substrate and sinter at temperatures that the DPF is exposed to during active regeneration.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0897
Dairene Uy, John Storey, C. Scott Sluder, Teresa Barone, Sam Lewis, Mark Jagner
The recirculation of gases from the crankcase and valvetrain can potentially lead to the entrainment of lubricant in the form of aerosols or mists. As boost pressures increase, the blow-by flow through both the crankcase and the valve cover increases. The resulting lubricant can then become part of the intake charge, potentially leading to fouling of intake components such as the intercooler and the turbocharger. The entrained aerosol which can contain the lubricant and soot may or may not have the same composition as the bulk lubricant. The complex aerodynamic processes that lead to entrainment can strip out heavy components or volatilize light components. Similarly, the physical size and numbers of aerosol particles can be dependent upon the lubricant formulation and engine speed and load. For instance, high rpm and load may increase not only the flow of gases but the amount of lubricant aerosol.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0895
Fengyuan Zhang, Jianwei Qiu, Zhiliang Jin, Dahua Zhang, Li Yang, Jingchun Xie, Xiaohong Xu
An anti-friction additive was studied in SM 5W-30 oil. Its tribological performance was evaluated on a four-ball tester, SRV and mini traction machine (MTM). This additive has been found to be an effective antifriction additive for lubricants or fuels. The investigation indicates that this additive possesses excellent energy saving and reducing friction characteristics in SM 5W-30 lubricating oil.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0891
Teri Kowalski
The automotive, lubricant, and testing industries are developing a new engine oil category, ILSAC GF-6. Included in that process is the development of four replacement engine tests, for those tests which will no longer be available because of parts availability, and two completely new engine tests. The study described in this paper covers the development of the Sequence IVB test as a replacement test for the Sequence IVA. The Sequence IVB Test is a low-temperature valvetrain wear test using a Toyota engine with a dual overhead cam direct acting mechanical bucket valve train system. The original intent for the new test was for it to be a direct replacement for the Sequence IVA, but as development progressed it was necessary to alter test conditions to ensure adequate wear was produced to allow discrimination among the oils used in the development process.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0197
Ravi Ranjan, Kaushal Kumar Jha, Lakshmaiah Brahmasani, Parvej Khan
The traditional approach of engine thermal behavior of engine during startup has largely be dependent on experimental studies and high fidelity simulations CFD. However these techniques require considerable effort, cost and time. The low fidelity simulations validated with experimental results becoming popular due to its ease in handling the several parameters, cost effectiveness and quick predictive results. A four point mass model of engine thermal behavior during cold start has been developed to study the engine warm up temperature. The four point mass model consider the lumped mass of coolant, mass of engine directly associated with coolant, mass of engine oil and mass of engine directly associated with engine oil. The advantage of four point model is predict the coolant temperature as well as lubricant temperature during the transient warm cycle of engine. The error between predicated temperatures and experimental are within 10%.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0247
Jiu Xu, Predrag Hrnjak
Understanding the flow at compressor discharge is essential for rational design of oil separators and other components. This paper presents visualization, experimental and analytical data of the flow at the discharge of an automotive air conditioning compressor. The flow regime is annular-mist consisting of gas-phase refrigerant flow and oil rich liquid in form of annular film and droplets. The paper reports a method to calculate the oil retention and oil circulation ratio based on oil film thickness, wave speed, oil droplet size, oil droplet speed, and mass flow rate. Oil flow parameters are measured by high-speed camera capture and video processing in a non-intrusive way. The estimated oil retention and oil circulation ratio results are compared quantitatively with the measurements from system experiments under different compressor outlet gas velocity.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0892
Oliver P. Taylor, Richard Pearson, Richard Stone
Most major regional automotive markets have stringent legislative targets for vehicle greenhouse gas emissions or fuel economy enforced by fiscal penalties. Large improvements in vehicle efficiency on mandated test cycles have already taken place in some markets through the widespread adoption of technologies such as downsizing or dieselization. Whilst alternative combustion concepts that promise step-out efficiency improvements continue to be of interest, there is now increased focus on approaches that give smaller, but significant incremental benefits, such as reducing parasitic losses due to engine friction. The reduction in tail pipe CO2 emission through the reduction of engine friction using lubricant formulation-controlled viscometric profiles has been reported by many authors. There also exist opportunities to reduce the lubricant viscosity during engine warm-up by thermal management of the lubricating oil as it performs its role in protecting the engine.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3843

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: