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Viewing 1 to 30 of 3917
2017-04-04
Event
This technical session focuses on fundamental and applied research that lowers frictional energy losses and enhances reliability and durability of automotive components. The topics include, but not limited to engine and drivetrain tribology, seals, bearing and gear lubrication, materials tribology, surface engineering, lubricants and additives, computer-aided tribology, tribotesting, as well as friction, wear and lubrication fundamentals.
2017-04-04
Event
In the industry there is continuing work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with driveline hardware and on improving the fluids used in these applications. In this session are presented a variety of papers dealing with different applications where the interaction of driveline fluids with equipment is important.
2017-04-04
Event
The industry continues to work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with engine hardware in order to improve vehicle efficiency, durability, and performance. The Engine Lubricants Session presents a variety of papers dealing with advances in engine oils and their relationship to improved hardware performance.
2017-04-04
Event
This session reviews advancements in heavy-duty engine oil technology and test methodology, focusing on achieving future emissions, durability and fuel efficiency expectations both in North America and Europe.
2017-04-04
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.`
2016-11-16
Event
This session contains one paper that investigates the effect of viscosity grade on engine deposits and fuel economy in motorcycles run on a chassis dynamometer.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0018
Mrinmoy Kalita, Murugesu Muralidharan, Masilamani Sithananthan, Muthan Subramanian, Yogesh Kumar Sharma, Bhuvenesh Tyagi, Sarita Garg, Ajay Kumar Sehgal, Shankara Sri Venkata Ramakumar, Ramadoss Suresh
Indian Two-Wheeler Industry is the largest in the world with the annual growth rate more than 10percent year after year. More than 60% of gasoline production in India is consumed by two wheeler segment. Ever rising fuel demand and global concern on climate change have focused to develop energy efficient and eco-friendly vehicles. Several techniques such as engine design, efficient transmission and use of better quality of fuels and lubricants are applied world over to improve the efficiency of the vehicles. Low viscosity engine lubricant is one of the approaches which can be easily applied for better fuel economy. The lubricant requirement of motorcycles differs from that of passenger cars. The motorcycle engine oil is subject to both engine as well as wet clutch transmission system which operate under severe conditions.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0007
Kento Shimizu, Shuhei Takahata, Kenta Miura, Hideo Shoji, Akira Iijima, Toshimasa Utaka, Kazushi Tamura
Abnormal combustion experiments were conducted in which engine oil additives were mixed into the test fuel in order to investigate their influence on the occurrence of abnormal combustion. A four-stroke side-valve engine that allowed in-cylinder visualization of the combustion flame and light absorption measurements were used in the experiments. Different type of calcium-based engine oil additives were mixed into the primary reference fuel (PRF 50) at the same ratios at which they are found in ordinary automotive engine oil.
2016-10-27 ...
  • October 27-28, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Baltimore, Maryland
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized.
2016-10-26
Event
The main performance properties of engine oils include preventing wear and improving fuel efficiency. However, engine lubricants must also prevent corrosion, seal degradation and not degrade over time. Techniques to study and lubricant technologies to control these often overlooked performance properties of engine oils are constantly being improved. This session will discuss the latest advances in these areas.
2016-10-25
Event
Improving the fuel economy performance of engines is one of if not the most critical performance property of engine lubricants. In order to improve fuel economy, engines may operate under conditions where low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) is occurring more frequently, which can cause damage to the engine. Lubricant advances to improve fuel economy and control LSPI are discussed in this session.
2016-10-24
Event
In the industry there is continuing work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with driveline hardware and on improving the fluids used in these applications. In this session are presented a variety of papers dealing with different applications where the interaction of driveline fluids with equipment is important.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2275
Kongsheng Yang, Kristin A. Fletcher, Jeremy P. Styer, William Y. Lam, Gregory H. Guinther
There has been a global technology convergence by engine manufacturers as they strive to meet or exceed the ever-increasing fuel economy mandates that are intended to mitigate the trend in global warming associated with CO2 emissions. While turbocharging and direct-injection gasoline technologies are not new, when combined they create the opportunity for substantial increase in power output at lower engine speeds. Higher output at lower engine speeds is inherently more efficient, and this leads engine designers to overall smaller engines. Lubricants optimized for older engines may not have the expected level of durability with more operating time being spent at higher specific output levels. Additionally, a phenomenon that is called low-speed preignition has become more prevalent with these engines.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2292
Masaharu Kassai, Ken Torii, Taisuke Shiraishi, Toru Noda, Tor Kit Goh, Karsten Wilbrand, Shaun Wakefield, Adam Healy, David Doyle, Roger Cracknell, Masahiko Shibuya
Effect of lubricant oil and fuel properties on low speed pre-ignition (LSPI) occurrence in boosted S.I. engines was experimentally evaluated with multi-cylinder engine and de-correlated lubricant oil and fuel matrices. Furthermore, assuming droplets of lubricant oil and fuel mixture as ignition source, droplets spray and evaporated homogeneous mixture of lubricant oil and fuel were tested its auto-ignitability with combustion bomb and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to analyze fundamental ignition process. In addition to already reported dominant additives, effect of various detailed additives on LSPI occurrence was confirmed. Also, fuel volatility was found its effectiveness on LSPI occurrence. These results support and reconfirm the validity of the LSPI mechanism hypothesis that we are focusing on: droplets of lubricant oil and fuel mixture, caused by adhesion of fuel spray on liner wall, will fly and pre-ignite before spark ignition.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2318
Wangkan Lin, Nancy Diggs, Catherine Frampton
As modern heavy-duty diesel engines produce more power while running at higher temperatures, increased levels of oxidation can introduce more acidic chemical species into the engine lubricants. In addition, higher compression ratios of the combustion chamber can lead to increased blow-by gases into the crankcase. These severe conditions can cause higher levels of corrosion on key engine parts, such as soft-metal-containing bearings. Protection against this type of corrosion in engine hardware has always been an important performance function of today’s HDD engine lubricants. All today’s lubricants contain various additives which neutralize the acids to prevent hardware corrosion through their base content, commonly measured as total base number (TBN). The majority of the TBN in lubricants comes from metal-containing over-based detergents, with different chemistries of the metals and soap molecules.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2315
Xiaobo Shen, Rajiv Taribagil, Stuart Briggs, Isabella Goldmints
An unprecedented global focus on the environment and greenhouse gas emissions has driven recent government regulations on automotive emissions across the globe. To achieve this improvement, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have advocated a progressive move to the use of low viscosity grade oils; the rationale being that lower viscosity oils reduce hydrodynamic frictional losses in the engine, thereby delivering higher levels of fuel economy and lower carbon emissions. However, the use of lower viscosity grades should not come at a compromise of engine durability and wear protection. Viscosity modifiers (VM) –polymeric additive components used to tailor the lubricant’s viscometric properties – have been viewed as a key enabler for achieving the desirable balance between fuel economy and engine durability performance.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2274
Paul V. Harvath, Shaelah Reidy, Jonathan Byer
Abstract The amount of acidic material in used engine oil is considered an indicator of the remaining useful life of the oil. Total acid number, determined by titration, is the most widely accepted method for determining acidic content but the method is not capable of speciation of individual acids. In this work, high molecular weight residue was isolated from used engine oil by dialysis in heptane. This residue was then analyzed using pyrolysis-comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Carboxylic acids from C2-C18 were identified in the samples with acetic acid found to be the most abundant. This identification provides new information that may be used to improve the current acid detection methodologies for used engine oils.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2276
Toyoharu Kaneko, Kazuo Yamamori, Hiroyuki Suzuki, Ko Onodera, Satoshi Ogano
Abstract Increasing numbers of vehicles equipped with downsized, turbocharged engines have been introduced seeking for better fuel economy. LSPI (low speed pre-ignition), which can damage engine hardware, is a potential risk of the engines. We reported that engine oil formulation affects frequency of LSPI events, and formulating magnesium detergents into oil is a promising option to prevent LSPI events. From the viewpoint of achieving better fuel economy by engine oil, lowering viscosity is being required. However, it causes reduced oil film thickness and will expand boundary lubrication condition regions in some engine parts. Hence, a technology to reduce friction under boundary lubrication becomes important.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2291
Yongsheng He, Zhimin Liu, Ian Stahl, Guiqiang Zhang, Youneng Zheng
Abstract Stochastic pre-ignition (SPI) has been commonly observed in turbocharged spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engines at low-speed and high-load conditions, which causes extremely high cylinder pressures that can damage an engine immediately or degrade the engine life. The compositions and properties of fuels and lubricants have shown a strong impact on SPI frequency. This study experimentally evaluated SPI behaviors on a 2.0-liter 4-cylinder turbocharged SIDI engine with China V market fuel and China fuel blended to US Tier II fuel specifications. China V market fuel showed significantly higher SPI frequency and severity than China blended US Tier II fuel, which was attributed to its lower volatility between 100 °C to 150 °C (or lower T60 to T90 in the distillation curve). Two different formulations of lubricant oils were also tested and their impact on SPI were compared.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2316
Sanjeev Kumar Singh, Shyam Singh, Ajay Kumar Sehgal
Global Fuel Economy Initiative with a goal to make automobiles worldwide 50 percent more efficient by the year 2050, enhanced interest in improvements of fuel economy and emission reduction from vehicles through engine technologies, lubricants and after treatment devices. Low viscosity grade engine oils can improve the fuel economy by reducing the friction and lower the greenhouse gases. In this study, low viscosity grade oils - 0W-20, 5W-30 and 20W-40 were selected for assessing fuel economy of diesel engines. Effects of viscosity on engine performance with respect to power, fuel economy and emissions were assessed by conducting fuel economy tests on single cylinder Petter AV1 diesel engine. Higher fuel economy and reduced CO, HC, CO2 and NOx emissions were observed with lower viscosity engine oils compared to higher viscosity engine oils.
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