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Viewing 1 to 30 of 3919
2017-04-04
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.`
2017-04-04
Event
The industry continues to work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with engine hardware in order to improve vehicle efficiency, durability, and performance. The Engine Lubricants Session presents a variety of papers dealing with advances in engine oils and their relationship to improved hardware performance.
2017-04-04
Event
In the industry there is continuing work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with driveline hardware and on improving the fluids used in these applications. In this session are presented a variety of papers dealing with different applications where the interaction of driveline fluids with equipment is important.
2017-04-04
Event
This session reviews advancements in heavy-duty engine oil technology and test methodology, focusing on achieving future emissions, durability and fuel efficiency expectations both in North America and Europe.
2017-04-04
Event
This technical session focuses on fundamental and applied research that lowers frictional energy losses and enhances reliability and durability of automotive components. The topics include, but not limited to engine and drivetrain tribology, seals, bearing and gear lubrication, materials tribology, surface engineering, lubricants and additives, computer-aided tribology, tribotesting, as well as friction, wear and lubrication fundamentals.
2016-11-17
Event
This session contains one paper that investigates the effect of viscosity grade on engine deposits and fuel economy in motorcycles run on a chassis dynamometer.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0018
Mrinmoy Kalita, M Muralidharan, M Sithananthan, M Subramanian, Yogesh Kumar Sharma, Bhuvenesh tyagi, Sarita Garg, Ajay Kumar Sehgal, S S V Ramakumar, R Suresh
Indian Two-Wheeler Industry is the largest in the world with the annual growth rate more than 10percent year after year. More than 60% of gasoline production in India is consumed by two wheeler segment. Ever rising fuel demand and global concern on climate change have focused to develop energy efficient and eco-friendly vehicles. Several techniques such as engine design, efficient transmission and use of better quality of fuels and lubricants are applied world over to improve the efficiency of the vehicles. Low viscosity engine lubricant is one of the approaches which can be easily applied for better fuel economy. The lubricant requirement of motorcycles differs from that of passenger cars. The motorcycle engine oil is subject to both engine as well as wet clutch transmission system which operate under severe conditions.
2016-10-27 ...
  • October 27-28, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Baltimore, Maryland
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized.
2016-10-26
Event
Improving the fuel economy performance of engines is one of if not the most critical performance property of engine lubricants. In order to improve fuel economy, engines may operate under conditions where low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) is occurring more frequently, which can cause damage to the engine. Lubricant advances to improve fuel economy and control LSPI are discussed in this session.
2016-10-25
Event
The main performance properties of engine oils include preventing wear and improving fuel efficiency. However, engine lubricants must also prevent corrosion, seal degradation and not degrade over time. Techniques to study and lubricant technologies to control these often overlooked performance properties of engine oils are constantly being improved. This session will discuss the latest advances in these areas.
2016-10-24
Event
In the industry there is continuing work on understanding the interaction of lubricating fluids with driveline hardware and on improving the fluids used in these applications. In this session are presented a variety of papers dealing with different applications where the interaction of driveline fluids with equipment is important.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2269
Peter Morgan, Alexander Michlberger, Michael Kocsis, Matt Gieselman, Ewan Delbridge
Chassis dynamometer tests are often used to determine vehicle fuel economy (FE). Since the entire vehicle is used, these methods are generally accepted to be more representative of ‘real-world’ conditions than engine dynamometer tests or small-scale bench tests. Unfortunately, evaluating vehicle fuel economy introduces higher levels of test-to-test variability than seen on engine dynamometer or bench tests. Recently, improvements to controls and procedures have led to drastically improved test precision in chassis dynamometer testing. Described herein are chassis dynamometer results from five fully-formulated engine oils (utilizing improved testing protocols on the FTP-75 and HwFET cycles) which not only show statistically significant FE changes across viscosity grades but also meaningful FE differentiation within a viscosity grade where additive systems have been modified.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2276
Toyoharu Kaneko, Kazuo Yamamori, Hiroyuki Suzuki, Ko Onodera, Satoshi Ogano
This paper describes our newly developed friction reduction technology for low viscosity engine oils formulated with molybdenum dithio-carbamate (MoDTC) and magnesium detergents. The surface chemistry of additive interactions will also be discussed. Low viscosity grade engine oils are being utilized in modern engines to achieve improved fuel economy. As a result, engine conditions increase in severity through a tendency to operate in a higher degree of boundary lubrication conditions. Therefore, MoDTC, a friction modifier known to reduce friction under these conditions, is becoming a key component. In addition to fuel economy, formulation chemistry to prevent Low Speed Pre-Ignition (LSPI) is also required. These chemistry advances are a necessity for downsized, turbocharged engines to maximize fuel economy improvement. To ensure sufficient engine oil performance, magnesium detergents are a key additive to prevent damaging LSPI events in the engine.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2318
Wangkan Lin, Nancy Diggs, Catherine Frampton
As modern heavy-duty diesel engines produce more power while running at higher temperatures, increased levels of oxidation can introduce more acidic chemical species into the engine lubricants. In addition, higher compression ratios of the combustion chamber can lead to increased blow-by gases into the crankcase. These severe conditions can cause higher levels of corrosion on key engine parts, such as soft-metal-containing bearings. Protection against this type of corrosion in engine hardware has always been an important performance function of today’s HDD engine lubricants. All today’s lubricants contain various additives which neutralize the acids to prevent hardware corrosion through their base content, commonly measured as total base number (TBN). The majority of the TBN in lubricants comes from metal-containing over-based detergents, with different chemistries of the metals and soap molecules.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2182
Olivier Laget, Louis-Marie Malbec, Julian kashdan, Nicolas Dronniou, Romain boissard, Patrick Gastaldi
The accumulation of particulate matter in lubricant oil has become an issue in Diesel engines where large amounts of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) are used at medium to high load operating conditions. Indeed, the accumulation of particulate matter in the engine oil can alter its lubricant properties resulting in mechanical durability issues or TCO increase due to shortened servicing intervals. It is therefore important to gain an improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for this accumulation of particulate matter in the lubricating oil, and ultimately provide design guidelines to help limit this phenomenon. The present study presents the development and validation of experimental and numerical tools used to investigate this phenomenon.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2277
Kristin Fletcher, Lisa dingwell, Kongsheng Yang, William Lam, Jeremy Styer
Low speed preignition (LSPI) is an undesirable combustion phenomenon that limits the fuel economy, drivability, emissions and durability performance of modern turbocharged engines. Because of the potential to catastrophically damage an engine after only a single event, the ability to reduce LSPI frequency has grown in importance over the last several years. This is evident in the significant increase in industry publications. It quickly became apparent that select engine oil components impact the frequency of LSPI events when evaluated in different engine tests, notably calcium detergent, molybdenum and phosphorus. However, a close examination of the impact of other formulation additives is lacking. A systematic evaluation of the impact of ashless as well as ash-containing additives has been undertaken using a GM 2.0L Ecotec engine installed on a conventional engine dynamometer test stand.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2256
Kristin Götz, Barbara Fey, Anja Singer, Juergen Krahl, Jürgen Bünger, Markus Knorr, Olaf Schröder
The climate target of the European Union (EU) is the reduction of 40 % greenhouse gas reduction from the 1990s level by 2030 [1]. Currently the transport sector is one of the biggest greenhouse gas emission producer in the EU [2]. Drop-in biofuels can contribute to the reduction of GHG emissions in the transport sector and so as well the total GHG emissions. Diesel R33, a new developed biofuel enables sustainable mobility fulfilling the European diesel fuel specification and can reduce the GHG emissions of about 17 % versus fossil diesel fuel. Diesel R33 is made from seven percent used cooking oil methyl ester, 26 percent hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) and 67 percent high quality diesel fuel. HVO was produced from rapeseed and palm oil. This new biofuel was tested in a fleet of 280 vehicles (passenger cars, light duty vehicles, off-road vehicles and urban buses) covering all emission classes.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2275
Kongsheng Yang, Kristin Fletcher, Jeremy Styer, William Lam, Gregory Guinther
There has been a global technology convergence by engine manufacturers as they strive to meet or exceed the ever-increasing fuel economy mandates that are intended to mitigate the trend in global warming associated with CO2 emissions. While turbocharging and direct-injection gasoline technologies are not new, when combined they create the opportunity for substantial increase in power output at lower engine speeds. Higher output at lower engine speeds is inherently more efficient, and this leads engine designers to overall smaller engines. Lubricants optimized for older engines may not have the expected level of durability with more operating time being spent at higher specific output levels. Additionally, a phenomenon that is called low-speed preignition has become more prevalent with these engines.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2315
Xiaobo Shen, Rajiv Taribagil, Stuart Briggs, Isabella Goldmints
An unprecedented global focus on the environment and greenhouse gas emissions has driven recent government regulations on automotive emissions across the globe. To achieve this improvement, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have advocated a progressive move to the use of low viscosity grade oils; the rationale being that lower viscosity oils reduce hydrodynamic frictional losses in the engine, thereby delivering higher levels of fuel economy and lower carbon emissions. However, the use of lower viscosity grades should not come at a compromise of engine durability and wear protection. Viscosity modifiers (VM) –polymeric additive components used to tailor the lubricant’s viscometric properties – have been viewed as a key enabler for achieving the desirable balance between fuel economy and engine durability performance.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2168
Masaharu Kassai, Taisuke Shiraishi, Toru Noda, Mamoru Hirabe, Yoshiki Wakabayashi, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
For the development of downsized spark ignition (SI) engine, an abnormal combustion issue which is called low speed pre-ignition(LSPI) was recognized and desired to be solved. To explain the too early pre-ignition timing in LSPI, we need to assume some pre-ignition source which is containing something other than fuel. Previously, it have been reported that LSPI can be caused by droplets of fuel and lubricant oil mixture. In this report, ignition behavior of lubricant component containing fuel injected toward premixed fuel-air mixture was experimentally investigated by using rapid compression and expansion machine (RCEM) which can visualize combustion process in cylinder. Various combinations of fuel composition for premixed fuel-air mixture and fraction of base oil, metallic additives, and fuel for injecting droplets were tested.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3919

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