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2017-04-04
Event
The Mobility History Committee has as its mission to link the lessons of the past to the present and, with such an understanding, to support the platform for future developments.
2016-12-01
Book
Jay Meldrum
This collection is a resource for studying the history of the evolving technologies that have contributed to snowmobiles becoming cleaner and quieter machines. Papers address design for a snowmobile using E10 gasoline (10% ethanol mixed with pump gasoline). Performance technologies that are presented include: • Engine Design: application of the four-stroke engine • Applications to address both engine and track noise • Exhaust After-treatment to reduce emissions The SAE International Clean Snowmobile Challenge (CSC) program is an engineering design competition. The program provides undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to enhance their engineering design and project management skills by reengineering a snowmobile to reduce emissions and noise. The competition includes internal combustion engine categories that address both gasoline and diesel, as well as the zero emissions category in which range and draw bar performance are measured.
2016-09-28
Event
Topics of interest include historical perspectives of Powered Lift Aviation Systems relevant to Short, Extremely Short, and Vertical Takeoff (STOL, ESTOL, VTOL) fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft. Histories of both “successful” and “unsuccessful” concepts that provided experience, lessons learned, and pushed the state-of-the-art in a way that significantly advanced the safety, efficiency, reliability and affordability of Powered Lift flight are appropriate for this session.
CURRENT
2016-08-19
Standard
AIR5354A
The following is the history of SAE Committee A-10.
CURRENT
2016-06-16
Standard
EMCB1_1
This EIA Bulletin No. EMCB1-1, "Historical Rationale for Military EM1 Limits", is presented by the Electronic Industries Association G46 Electromagnetic Compatibility Committee. It has been prepared to provide a reference source for electromagnetic compatibility practitioners to enable more knowledgeable application of EMI requirements in equipment and system specifications and designs.
2016-04-12
Event
The Mobility History Committee has as its mission to link the lessons of the past to the present and, with such an understanding, to support the platform for future developments.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0175
Edward G. Groff
Abstract Spark-ignition direct-injection technology existed since about 1930 for the primary purpose to give multifuel capability over what the compression-ignited diesel engine could provide. In subsequent decades development of multifuel engines continued both as higher-compression-ratio “spark-ignited diesel” and moderate-compressionratio stratified-charge engines. Global events in the 1960-1970’s, namely the oil embargo, oil-supply crises, and the passage of the U.S. Clean Air Act intensified interest in such engines. The military and large commercial fleet operators were particularly focused on efficiency and multifuel capability over concerns for fuel supplies. Automobile manufacturers were focused on gasoline-fueled efficiency and the potential to reduce engine-out legislated NOx emissions with the stratified-charged combustion systems.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0176
Joseph M. Colucci
Abstract This paper summarizes the history and most significant accomplishments of the GMR-GMR&D Fuels and Lubricants Department from its predecessor organization starting about 100 years ago to its demise during a reorganization in the late 1990s. It covers: Combustion research to improve engine efficiency and reduce emissions, Development of chemical, bench, engine, and vehicle tests to improve fuel and lubricant quality, Development of technology to reduce vehicle emissions, Research to understand and reduce air pollution, and Evaluation of alternative fuels and lubricants. In total, the above activities helped not only GM and the worldwide auto industry, but also society. They improved the operation of vehicles and the quality of the air in the United States and around the globe, favorably affecting the lives of hundreds of millions of people. They also created the recognition of and the reputation of the Fuels and Lubricants Department as the best of its kind in the world.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1497
William Bortles, Wayne Biever, Neal Carter, Connor Smith
Abstract This paper presents a comprehensive literature review of original equipment event data recorders (EDR) installed in passenger vehicles, as well as a summary of results from the instrumented validation studies. The authors compiled 187 peer-reviewed studies, textbooks, legal opinions, governmental rulemaking policies, industry publications and presentations pertaining to event data recorders. Of the 187 total references, there were 64 that contained testing data. The authors conducted a validation analysis using data from 27 papers that presented both the EDR and corresponding independent instrumentation values for: Vehicle velocity change (ΔV) Pre-Crash vehicle speed The combined results from these studies highlight unique observations of EDR system testing and demonstrate the observed performance of original equipment event data recorders in passenger vehicles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0177
Edward G. Groff
During the late 1980’s and early 1990’s the two-stroke-cycle engine was an extremely popular and highly publicized automotive powertrain technology globally. Active development programs existed at many OEMs during that period, including GM, where the author was involved, and production seemed eminent. Autoweek stated on the cover of its March 12, 1990 issue, “Revolution for the millennium or Wankel of the ‘90s?” This paper covers the new technologies that led to the generation of so much excitement in the industry and press, the advantages and disadvantages of the engine concept, R&D tools developed at that time that are still in use today, and various engine concepts pursued in the industry. The story is not only interesting from engineering and technology perspectives but illustrates how innovations in certain subsystems become enablers to revive a system technology by eliminating issues that prevented it from making it to production in the past.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2487
Dara Childs
Abstract Rotordynamics developed from the beginning of the 20th century to deal with problems associated with steam turbines. This paper deals with intense developments starting around 1975 through 2000 in rotordynamics to deal with new, larger machines running at higher speeds and higher power levels. Most of the new problems of interest dealt with subsynchronous instabilities. Issues associated with “synchromnously unstable” motion due to the Morton Effect is also reviewed.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2581.01
Paul Dees, Scott Eberhardt
The original paper published mistakenly did not include Paul Dees, Boeing in the author listing.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2581
Scott Eberhardt
Abstract World War 1 began with the airplane as a frail, unarmed means of observing enemy troop movements and ended with the airplane as a powerful, much more evolved weapon of war. There were specialized roles for fighter, bomber and ground attack aircraft as well as newly developed aerial strategies and tactics for operational effectiveness. Many aircraft design technologies greatly matured during the war. Four will be the subject of this paper: Drag reduction, aircraft handling qualities, stability and control, airfoil design technology, and structures design technology. Propulsion and armament also matured greatly but are not discussed in the paper. The discussion of drag reduction will illustrate the innovations of the British on external wire bracing drag, the French on cowl design and the Germans on cantilevered wings and induced drag.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2580
David Lednicer
Abstract During the 1930s and 1940s, aircraft designers worked on developing novel design features. Some of these features worked and are commonplace today. Other features fell by the wayside and have been forgotten. These novel design features include laminar flow wings, low-drag cooling systems, buried propulsion systems, canard configurations, jet engines, break-away wing tips, pressure cabins and swept wings. The development and applications of these features will be examined. Specific technical details of these applications will be included in this examination. For the design features that fell by the wayside, the reasons for this outcome will be discussed
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0416
Howard Evans
Abstract This paper summarises the history of Rochdale Motor Panels and Engineering Ltd. (RMP), established in England after the Second World War, from its origins as a small car-repair business though to the manufacture of sports coupés utilising an innovative glass-fibre monocoque construction. The political climate which caused RMP and similar undertakings to develop and flourish in the 1950s and 60s is explained together with details of the three men who had the defining influence on the cars that were created. Products, including aluminium-bodied cars, produced primarily for racing, are described, leading into the introduction of glass-fibre construction which enabled a profitable transition into higher volume body and chassis manufacture, and ultimately completely assembled cars.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0972
Alexander Pawlowski, Derek Splitter
Abstract It is well known that spark ignited engine performance and efficiency is closely coupled to fuel octane number. The present work combines historical and recent trends in spark ignition engines to build a database of engine design, performance, and fuel octane requirements over the past 80 years. The database consists of engine compression ratio, required fuel octane number, peak mean effective pressure, specific output, and combined unadjusted fuel economy for passenger vehicles and light trucks. Recent trends in engine performance, efficiency, and fuel octane number requirement were used to develop correlations of fuel octane number utilization, performance, specific output. The results show that historically, engine compression ratio and specific output have been strongly coupled to fuel octane number.
2014-11-24
Book
Gijs Mom
This book covers one and a quarter century of the automobile, conceived as a cultural history of its technology, aimed at engineering students and all those who wish to have a concise introduction into the basics of automotive technology and its long-term development . Its approach is systemic and includes the behavior of drivers, producers, nonusers, victims, and other "stakeholders" as well as the discourse around mobility. Nowadays, students of innovation prefer the term co-evolution, emphasizing the parallel and mutually dependent development of technology and society. This acknowledges the importance of contingency and of the impact of the past upon the present, the very reason why The Evolution of Automotive Technology: A Handbook looks at car technology from a long-term perspective. Often we will conclude that the innovation was in the (re)arrangement of existing technologies. Since its beginnings, car manufacturers have brought a total of 1 billion automobiles to the market.
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