Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 4029
2017-04-21
Event
2017-03-10
Event
2016-11-14 ...
  • November 14-16, 2016 (8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) - Tysons, Virginia
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
SAE International is pleased to announce that this course will also be offered in London UK at IMechE, One Birdcage Walk, SW1H9JJ during the week of June 6th through June 10th. The SAE Europe Aerospace Training Week is a series of courses designed especially for the aerospace engineer. For additional information about this course, others and to register, please visit http://sae-europe.org/aerospace-training-week-june-2016-london/#programme.
2016-09-28 ...
  • September 28-29, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Cerritos, California
  • October 26-27, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Warrendale, Pennsylvania
  • November 24-25, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Shanghai, China
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The certification of transport category cabin interiors requires a thorough understanding of Part 25 Transport Category aircraft cabin interior safety and crashworthiness regulations and compliance requirements. Regardless of whether it is a simple modification, a specialized completion (VIP or VVIP) or airline passenger configuration, engineers, designers, and airworthiness personnel must understand and adhere to these requirements. This two day seminar will begin with a discussion of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) test requirements.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2112
Hilmar Apmann
As a new material FML made by aluminum foils and Glasfibre-Prepreg is a real alternative to common materials for fuselages of aircrafts. Since experiences within A380 this material has some really good advantages and becomes status as alternative to Aluminum and composite structures. Main goal for an industrial application for a higher production rates of aircrafts (like for single aisle) is the automation of production processes inside the process chain for FML-parts like skins and panels for fuselages. To reach these goals for high production rates first steps of automation inside this process chain have been developed in the last two years. Main steps is the automated lay-up of metallic foils and Glasfibre-Prepreg and also for integration of the bond film. Over this there are some more steps within positioning of i.e. stringers and doublers by automatic integration and shorter process chain to reduce process cost significantly.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2098
Christophe Vandaele, Didier Friot, Simon Marry, Etienne Gueydon
With more than 10 000 aircrafts in their order backlog, automated assembly is of critical importance to the progress for aircraft manufacturers. Moreover to obtain maximum benefit from automation, it is necessary to achieve not only an integrated fastener cell, but also a real breakthrough in fasteners technology. The optimum solution, known as "One Side Assembly", performs the whole assembly sequence from one side of the structure using an accurate robot arm equipped with a Multi function End effector and high performances fasteners. This configuration provides an efficient and flexible automated installation process, superior to current solutions which are typically, large scale, capital intensive, systems, which still require operators to complete or control the fastener installation. The search for a technological breakthrough in this domain has been targeted for more than 15 years by the majors aircrafts manufacturers.
2016-09-26 ...
  • September 26-27, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Hartford, Connecticut
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
ARP4754A substantially revises the industry guidance for the development of aircraft and aircraft systems while taking into account the overall aircraft operating environment and functions. This development process includes validation of requirements and verification of the design implementation for certification and product assurance. ARP4754A provides the practices for showing compliance with regulations and serves to assist companies in developing and meeting its own internal standards though application of the described guidelines.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2026
Dhwanil Shukla, Nandeesh Hiremath, Narayanan Komerath
Rigid or semi-rigid airships are gaining appeal for several applications requiring steady cargo transport, long endurance, low downwash and noise over populated areas, and rescue missions. Modern rigid-hulled airships use auxiliary lift and propulsion for the load-carrying segments of their operations. Tilting ducted fans and quad-rotors have been typically considered for the purpose. We are developing a concept where cycloidal rotors are used. These can operate both as lifting devices and as propulsive devices. The size of an airship allows the cylcoidal rotor to have a much larger diameter than on a helicopter, so that the rotation speed is low, and while minimizing downwash and noise. These features make the cycloidal rotor/airship combination ideas for the hypercommuting-on-demand application over congested urban and suburban areas. In this paper, the literature on hypercommuting, airships and cycloidal rotors will be surveyed.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2056
Nikolaus Thorell, Vaibhav Kumar, Narayanan Komerath
A combat aircraft in landing approach is likely to encounter wind turbulence, causing the flow over its swept wings to be yawed. This paper examines the effect of yaw on the spectra of turbulence above and aft of the wing, in the region where fins and control surfaces are located. Prior work has shown the occurrence of narrowband velocity fluctuations in this region for most combat aircraft models, including those with twin fins. Fin vibration and damage has been traced to excitation by such narrowband fluctuations. The issue in this paper is the effect of yaw on these fluctuations, as well as on the aerodynamic loads on a wing. A 42 degree delta wing with rounded leading edges, roughly equivalent to a 1/25 scale of existing combat aircraft, is used in a 2.74 m low speed wind tunnel in the angle of attack range 18 to 35 degrees and at significant yaw settings.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2010
Nandeesh Hiremath, Dhwanil Shukla, Narayanan Komerath
The design of advanced rotorcraft hinges on knowledge of the flowfield and loads on the rotor blade at extreme advance ratios (ratios of the forward flight speed to rotor tip speed). In this domain, strong vortices form above and below the rotor, and their evolution has a sharp influence on the aerodynamics loads experienced by the rotor, particularly the loads experienced at pitch links. To capture the load distribution, the surface pressure distribution must be captured. This has posed a severe problem in wind tunnel experiments. A 2-bladed teetering rotor with collective and cyclic pitch controls is used in a 2.74m wind tunnel, under conditions of dynamic stall and then in reverse flow. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry us used. Recently we have shown that the accuracy of stereoscopic particle image velocimetry has reached the point where velocity measurements can be converted to pressure both at and away from the blade surface.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1979
William D. Bertelsen
Technology to create a VTOL for general aviation that is fast, efficient, easy to fly, and affordable, has proven elusive. Bertelsen Design LLC has built a large research model to investigate the potential of the arc wing VTOL to fulfill these attributes. The aircraft that is the subject of this paper weighs approximately 145 kg (320 lbs) and features coaxial, dual-rotating propellers, diameter 1.91 m (75 inches). Power is from an MZ-202 two-cycle, two-cylinder engine. Wingspan is 1.82 m (72 inches). The arc wing differentiates this aircraft from previous deflected-slipstream prototypes, which suffered from pitch-trim issues during transition. This paper will present configuration details of the Bertelsen model, showing how it is possible to generate high lift from a short-span wing system. The Bertelsen model can hover out of ground effect using just two arc-wing elements: a main wing and a “slat”.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1989
Qiong Wang, Rolando Burgos, Xuning Zhang, Dushan Boroyevich, Adam White, Mustansir Kheraluwala
In modern aircraft power systems active power converters have been increasingly adopted to replace passive (diode-based) rectifiers seeking to increase the power-density and specific-weight of these units. These converters represent a significant challenge from a design standpoint due to the added degrees of freedom they offer, which have been further expanded by the adoption of wide-bandgap (WBG) power semiconductors. As such, their design requires the formulation of complex multi-disciplinary, multi-loop design procedures to ensure that they are built to fully exploit their power processing capabilities, while meeting the operational requirements of aircraft applications; including electromagnetic interference (EMI) standards, power quality standards, form factor and weight constraints, efficiency, and other relevant figures of merit.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2059
Rolf Loewenherz, Virgilio Valdivia-Guerrero, Daniel Diaz Lopez, Joshua Parkin
Auto transformer rectifier units (ATRUs) are commonly used in aircraft applications such as electric actuation for harmonic mitigation due to its high reliability and relative low cost. However, those components and the magnetic filter components associated to it are major contributors to the overall size and weight of the system. Optimization of the magnetic components is essential in order to minimize weight and size, which are major market drivers in aerospace industry today. This requires knowledge of the harmonic content of the current. This can be obtained by simulation, but the process is slow. In order to enable fast and efficient design space exploration of optimal solutions, an algebraic calculation process is proposed in this paper for multi-pulse ATRUs (e.g. 12-pulse and 18-pulse rectifiers), starting from existing solution proposed for 6 pulse rectifier in the literature.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1984
Michael Krenz
The cost of going from point A to point B is really all about how efficiently we convert stored energy into the motion desired to move us to the desired end point in a given amount of time and within the constraints of infrastructure. While it may be theoretically possible to use a rocket powered car to go from New York to Los Angeles, it is not practical to consider doing so given the available infrastructure. Several constraints will bound this discussion. First, the desired travel distance is approximately 4,000nm within 1 business day (~8 hours). Second, this distance may be either over land or water. Third, existing infrastructure is assumed without significant changes. And fourth, the individual cost of the trip shall not exceed 75% of the cost of a comparable trip today (that is, a 25% cost reduction is required). While mature (e.g.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2024
Allan J. Volponi, Liang Tang
Engine module performance trending and engine system anomaly detection and identification is a core capability for any engine Condition Based Maintenance system. The genesis of on-condition monitoring can be traced back nearly 4 decades, and a methodology known as Gas Path Analysis (GPA) has played a pivotal role in its evolution. Gas Path Analysis is a general methodology that assesses and quantifies changes in the underlying performance of the major modules of the engine (compressors and turbines) which directly affect performance changes of interest such as fuel consumption, power availability, compressor surge margins, etc. It utilizes instrumentation such as spool speeds, inter-stage temperatures and pressures and power output, much of which is already available on the propulsion system for control purposes.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2025
Amir Fazeli, Adnan Cepic, Susanne Reber
Aircraft weight and center of mass are two critical design and operational parameters that have to be within a design envelope to ensure a safe and efficient operation of aircraft. Previous efforts to accurately determine aircraft weight and center of mass before takeoff using landing gear shock strut pressures have failed due to the distortion of measured pressures by shock strut seal friction. Currently, aircraft loading process is controlled with loading sheets and passenger/cargo weight estimation as there are no online measurement systems that can accurately and efficiently estimate aircraft weight and determine the center of mass location before takeoff. However, errors in loading sheets, shifting cargo and errors in weight estimation could lead to incorrect loading of aircraft and, consequently, increase the risk of accidents, particularly in cargo flights.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2034
Tobias Kreitz, Frank Thielecke
The aviation industry is facing major challenges due to increased environmental requirements that are driven by economic constraints. For this reason, guidelines like "Flightpath 2050", the official guide of European aviation, call for significant reductions in pollutant emissions. The concept of the "More Electric Aircraft" offers promising perspectives to meet these demands. A key-enabler for this concept is the integration of new technologies on board of the next generation of civil transportation aircraft. Examples are electro-mechanical actuators for primary flight controls or the fuel cell technology as innovative electrical energy supply system. Due to the high complexity and interdisciplinary, the development of such systems is an equally challenging and time-consuming process. To support the classical development process, a continuous model-based approach for the design and test of complex aircraft systems is currently developed at the Hamburg University of Technology.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2031
Michal Sztykiel, Steven Fletcher, Patrick Norman, Stuart Galloway, Graeme Burt
There is a well-recognized need for robust simulation tools to support the design and evaluation of future More-Electric Engine and Aircraft (MEE/MEA) design concepts. Design options for these systems are increasingly complex, and normally include multiple power electronics converter topologies and machine drive units. In order to identify the most promising set of system configurations, large number of existing technology variants need to be rapidly evaluated. This paper will describe a method of MEE/MEA system design with the use of a newly developed transient modelling, simulation and testing tool aimed at accelerating the identification process of optimal components, testing novel technologies and finding key solutions at an early development stage. The developed tool is a Matlab/Simulink library consisting of functional sub-system units, which can be rapidly integrated to build complex system architectures.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1987
Mingming Yin, Serhiy Bozhko, Seang Shen Yeoh
The paper will deal with the control design for an electric generation system which for future aircrafts. The future on-board systems are expected to be more efficient, safer, simpler in servicing and easier in maintenance. As a result, many existing hydraulic and pneumatic power driven systems are being replaced by their electrical counterparts. This trend is known as a move towards the More-Electric Aircraft (MEA). As a result, a large number of new electrical loads have been introduced in order to power many primary functions including actuation, de-icing and anti-icing, cabin air-conditioning, and engine start. Therefore electric power generation systems have a key role in supporting this technological trend. The state-of-the-art generation technology typically employs a three-stage wound-field synchronous machine. Advances in modern power electronics now allow the developers to consider including other machine types within the S/G.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2014
Jonathan M. Rheaume, Charles Lents
The United Technologies Research Center has investigated a hybrid electric aircraft propulsion system for a commercial single aisle aircraft. The propulsion system features twin Geared Turbo Fan (GTF) engines in which each low speed spool is assisted by a 2,500 HP electric motor during takeoff and climb. During cruise, the aircraft is powered solely by the turbine engines which are sized for efficient operation during this mission phase. A survey of state of the art energy storage options was conducted. Battery, supercapacitor, and flywheel metrics were collected from the literature including Specific Energy (Wh/kg), Volumetric Energy Density (Wh/L), Power Density (W/kg), Cost ($/kWh), and Number of Cycles. Energy storage in fuels with converters was sized for comparison including fuel cells (both proton exchange membrane and solid oxide operating on hydrogen or on jet fuel) and a turbogenerator (jet fuel or LNG).
Viewing 1 to 30 of 4029

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: