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Viewing 1 to 30 of 3819
Event
2015-06-22
This session is devoted to NVH issues arising within the aeronautical and aerospace industries, such as community noise, aircraft interior noise, aerospace vibro-acoustics, noise prediction, modeling and modal analysis.
Event
2015-04-24
Event
2015-03-13
Training / Education
2014-12-10
The certification of transport category cabin interiors requires a thorough understanding of Part 25 Transport Category aircraft cabin interior safety and crashworthiness regulations and compliance requirements. Regardless of whether it is a simple modification, a specialized completion (VIP or VVIP) or airline passenger configuration, engineers, designers, and airworthiness personnel must understand and adhere to these requirements. This two day seminar will begin with a discussion of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) test requirements. The instructor will then guide participants through the various cabin interior emergency provisions and their requirements such as supplemental passenger oxygen, emergency equipment, seats, flammability, emergency exits, emergency lighting and escape path markings, and various other cabin interior systems.
Training / Education
2014-12-08
ARP4754A substantially revises the industry guidance for the development of aircraft and aircraft systems while taking into account the overall aircraft operating environment and functions. This development process includes validation of requirements and verification of the design implementation for certification and product assurance. ARP4754A provides the practices for showing compliance with regulations and serves to assist companies in developing and meeting its own internal standards though application of the described guidelines. This two day seminar will provide attendees with an in-depth presentation of the guidelines introduced in the revised recommended practice for aircraft and systems development as well as the critical concepts used in aircraft and systems development processes for certification.
Event
2014-09-25
Unmanned vehicle systems provide a unique environment regarding the integration and incorporation of all of the vehicle systems. There is a need to leverage OA and open interfaces to overcome the problems associated with proprietary robotic system architectures. This session will explore standards and interface specifications that need to be established to achieve modularity, commonality, and interchangeability across the electrical power systems, payloads, control systems, video/audio interfaces, data, and communication links. Standardization will enhance competition, lower life-cycle costs, and provide war fighters with enhanced unmanned capabilities that enable commonality and joint interoperability on the battlefield.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Joseph Dygert, Melissa Morris, Patrick Browning
Abstract The high demand for traditional air traffic as well as increased use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) has resulted in researchers examining alternative technologies which would result in safer, more reliable, and better performing aircraft. Active methods of aerodynamic flow control may be the most promising approach to this problem. Research in the area of aerodynamic control is transitioning from traditional mechanical flow control devices to, among other methods, plasma actuators. Plasma actuators offer an inexpensive and energy efficient method of flow control. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD), one of the most widely studied forms of plasma actuation, employs an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) device which uses dominant electric fields for actuation. Unlike traditional flow control methods, a DBD device operates without moving components or mass injection methods. Publications discussing the optimization of DBD flow control versus a single variable such as gap width, voltage, dielectric constant, etc., have been widely published, and instigated a 2003 paper published by the IEEE-DEIS-EHD Technical Committee titled “Recommended International Standard for Dimensionless Parameters Used in Electrohydrodynamics.”
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Rostislav Sirotkin, Galina Susova, Gennadii Shcherbakov
Abstract Within the Russian aviation industry the necessary level of reliability risks related to the failures of aircraft mechanical parts and systems vital to the safety of flight is assured via the system of activities aimed at influencing the parameters of critical parts (CP). The goal of the system is to provide a relationship between activities aimed at prevention of dangerous failures at all phases of airplane life cycle. The system operation is regulated by the normative documents and by controlling their observance. Normative documents containing requirements and recommendations were developed about 15 years ago based on the industry experience and traditions and taking into account the requirements of AS9100 series of international standards [2] wherever possible. The documents were developed taking into account typical safety management errors outlined in [1]. Requirements specifying the necessity of CP-related activities are specified in the national standards concerning the organization of quality management system (QMS) in the aviation industry as well as programs of safety, reliability and maintainability activities.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Jason Rediger, Joseph Malcomb, Craig Sylvester
Abstract A new portable floor drilling machine, the 767AFDE, has been designed with a focus on increased reach and speed, ease-of-use, and minimal weight. A 13-foot wide drilling span allows consolidation of 767 section 45 floor drilling into a single swath. A custom CNC interface simplifies machine operations and troubleshooting. Four servo-driven, air-cooled spindles allow high rate drilling through titanium and aluminum. An aluminum space frame optimized for high stiffness/weight ratio allows high speed operation while minimizing aircraft floor deflection. Bridge track tooling interfaces between the machine and the aircraft grid. A vacuum system, offline calibration plate, and transportation dolly complete the cell.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Massimo Conte, Michele Trancossi
Abstract This paper introduces a new equipment, which allows autonomous landing and docking of a VTOL aircraft and any mobile system. It has been studied and developed inside the MAAT (Multibody Advanced Airship for Transport) EU FP7 project to control autonomous docking of manned cruiser and feeder airships in movement. After a detailed analysis it has been verified that It could be considered a technological spin off the MAAT project. It defines a new instrumental system for governing relative positioning between a movable target and VTOL air vehicles, such as helicopters, airships and multi-copters. This solution is expected to become a short time to market equipment for helicopters (both manned and unmanned) ensuring autonomous landing ability even in case of low visibility. Infrared emitters allow controlling both position and yaws angle. It is in advanced testing phase after a preliminary successful testing using a quadcopter. Tests has produced autonomous landing on a small platform mounted on an unmanned vehicle.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Marco Amrhein, Brian Raczkowski, Jason Wells, Eric Walters, Sean Field, Jason Gousy
Abstract Analyzing and maintaining power quality in an electrical power system (EPS) is essential to ensure that power generation, distribution, and loads function as expected within their designated operating regimes. Standards such as MIL-STD-704 and associated documents provide the framework for power quality metrics that need to be satisfied under varying operating conditions. However, analyzing these power quality metrics within a fully integrated EPS based solely on measurements of relevant signals is a different challenge that requires a separate framework containing rules for data acquisition, metric calculations, and applicability of metrics in certain operating conditions/modes. Many EPS employed throughout industry and government feature various alternating-current (ac) power systems. Ac systems have similar power quality metrics as direct-current (dc) systems, but also feature additional metrics for frequency and phase angle, which are part of the ac signal (unlike dc signals, for which frequency and phase angle have no meaning).
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Evgeni Ganev, William Warr, Keming Chen
Abstract This paper presents a novel method and system for an electric power alternating-current (AC)-to-direct-current (DC) converter employing composite technology. The term composite entails utilization of more than one type of conversion operating in parallel. In addition, background information for the prior art, based on conventional autotransformer rectifier units (ATRUs), and active converters are discussed. The major requirements of AC-to-DC converters from both functional and protection perspectives are provided. The concept of the new approach is defined. Comparative analysis between the new and old methods is documented. The performance features and technical details of the system parameters with respect to AC-to-DC converter system requirements are presented and discussed. Analysis, simulation results, and test data are included. Finally, the advantages of this technology, which nearly doubles power density compared to the state-of-the-art, are summarized and a conclusion included.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Mike Boost
Abstract Rechargeable lithium batteries are essentially ubiquitous in our daily lives and in virtually every industry from pocket key fobs to billion dollar space programs, in benign as well as extreme environments. Cell production in 2012 was estimated at 4.4 billion cells and expected to double by 2016. However within civil aviation, lithium batteries are still in the early stages of deployment. The general consensus within the industry is that the use of lithium batteries within civil aviation will increase substantially in the coming years. This paper focuses on design considerations with respect to deployment of rechargeable, or secondary, lithium batteries within civil aviation.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Kyle Merical, Troy Beechner, Paul Yelvington
Abstract A series hybrid-electric propulsion system has been designed for small rapid-response unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) with the goals of improving endurance, providing flexible and responsive electric propulsion, and enabling heavy fuel usage. The series hybrid architecture used a motor-driven propeller powered by a battery bank, which was recharged by an engine-driven generator, similar to other range-extended electric vehicles. The engine design focused on a custom, two-stroke, lean-burn, compression-ignition (CI), heavy-fuel engine, which was coupled with an integrated starter alternator (ISA) to provide electrical power. The heavy-fuel CI engine was designed for high power density, improved fuel efficiency, and compatibility with heavy fuels (e.g., diesel, JP-5, JP-8). Commercially available gasoline spark-ignition engines and heavy-fuel spark-ignition engines were also considered in the trade study. The series hybrid configuration allowed the engine to be mechanically decoupled from propeller, so that the engine could be operated at the load/speed condition for peak fuel-conversion efficiency.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Michael Izenson, Jerry Bieszczad, Patrick Magari, James Sisco
Abstract We have assembled and demonstrated a prototype power system that uses an innovative hydrogen generator to fuel an ultra-compact PEM fuel cell that is suitable for use in small unmanned aerial system (UAS) propulsion systems. The hydrogen generator uses thermal decomposition of ammonia borane (AB) to produce hydrogen from a very compact and lightweight package. An array of AB fuel pellets inside a low pressure container is activated sequentially to produce hydrogen on demand as it is consumed by the fuel cell. The fuel cell plant utilized in the power system prototype has been flown as part of several small UAS development programs and has logged hundreds of hours of flight time. The plant was designed specifically to be readily integrated with a range of hydrogen fueling subsystems and contains the balance of plant necessary to facilitate stand-alone operation. Based on results of these tests, we produced a conceptual design for a flight system. We project overall gravimetric and volumetric power densities of 350 W hr/L and 600 W hr/kg.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Ralf D. Pechstedt
Abstract Recently, there has been an increasing interest in Fiber Optic Sensors (FOS) for aircraft applications. Many of the FOS are based on different transducer mechanisms and hence, employ sensor-specific readout systems. However, for ease of maintenance and cost saving purposes, a ‘universal interrogator’ that can be used with at least a large sub-group of sensors is the preferred option for deployment in aircraft. Oxsensis has been developing sensors for harsh environments with focus on land based gas-turbine monitoring and combustion control and more recently is also looking at applying its technology to other areas such as Aerospace and Oil & Gas. In this paper we report on recent progress on the development of a number of FOS and how these could find application in aircraft with a ‘universal interrogator’ concept in mind.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Karen Davies, Patrick Norman, Catherine Jones, Stuart Galloway, Graeme Burt
Abstract Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) is actively being investigated as a means of providing thrust in future generations of aircraft. In response to the lack of published work regarding the system-level fault behaviour of a fully superconducting network, this paper presents key points from a two stage Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of a representative TeDP network. The first stage FMEA examines the qualitative behaviour of various network failure modes and considers the subsequent effects on the operation of the remainder of the network, enabling the identification of key variables influencing the fault response of the network. For the second stage FMEA, the paper focuses on the characterisation of the rate at which electrical faults develop within a TeDP network. The impact of system quench and associated rise in network resistance as well as network parameters such as network voltage and pre-fault current, on the resulting fault profile are also examined using a range of sensitivity studies.
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