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Technical Paper

F/A-18 E/F Outer Wing Lean Production System

2001-09-10
2001-01-2608
The Boeing F/A-18 E/F Program Wing Team, Lean Organization and Phantom Works have partnered to develop a “state of the art” lean production system for the Outer Wing that represents an evolutionary change in aircraft design and assembly methodology. This project is focused on improving quality, cycle and cost performance through the implementation of lean principles, technology integration and process improvements. This paper will discuss the approach taken to reach the end state objectives and the technologies and processes being developed to support it. Items to be discussed include lean principles and practices, new tooling concepts, improved part assembly techniques, advanced drilling systems, process flow enhancements and part handling/part delivery systems.
Technical Paper

EVA Operations Using the Spacelab Logistics Pallet for Hardware Deliveries

2001-07-09
2001-01-2201
There are a large number of space structures, orbital replacement units (ORUs) and other components that must be transported to orbit on a regular basis for the assembly and maintenance of the International Space Station (ISS). Some of this hardware will be ferried on the Spacelab Logistics Pallet (SLP), which has a long and reliable history of space flight successes. The carrier is well used, well qualified, and very adaptable for repeated use in accommodating cargoes of various sizes and shapes. This paper presents an overview of past, present and future hardware design solutions that accommodate EVA operations on the SLP. It further demonstrates how analysis techniques and design considerations have influenced the hardware development, EVA operations, and compliance with human engineering requirements for the SLP.
Technical Paper

Specification Reform of Avionics Thermal Design Criteria – An F-15 Case Study

2001-07-09
2001-01-2156
Traditional thermal design criteria for avionics equipment are reviewed. Several studies have recently been conducted on the F-15 to assess accuracy of these design criteria. An overview of the study approach and results are presented. Specific topics investigated include: emergency cooling air provisions, cold start-up, hot start-up, normal and transient bay temperatures, and altitude design. The results indicate that many existing design criteria are overly conservative. The study findings suggest that reform of the existing thermal specification process is needed. Many of these reforms are applicable to the general aerospace industry and may result in significant acquisition cost savings as a result of the trend toward usage of commercial electronic parts. The reforms suggested include a new performance based thermal specification approach that increases emphasis on aircraft usage and frequency of occurrence. New transient design criteria are also recommended.
Technical Paper

Integrated Metrology & Robotics Systems for Agile Automation

2000-09-19
2000-01-3033
Aircraft manufacturing in the 21st century sees a future much different to that seen one and two decades before. Manufacturers of both military and commercial aircraft are challenged to become Lean, Agile and Flexible. As progress is slowly made toward introducing advanced assembly systems into production, the overall cost of automation is now more closely scrutinized. After spending tens of millions of dollars on large automated systems with deep foundations, many manufacturers find themselves locked into high cost manufacturing systems that have specific, inflexible configurations. This kind of scenario has caused a shift in the attitude of airframe assemblers, to go back to basics. Lean manufacturing is seen as a way to build aircraft with very low investment in equipment and tools. Today's advanced systems developers do understand the need for more affordable assembly systems.
Technical Paper

A Generic Process for Human Model Analysis

2000-06-06
2000-01-2167
The purpose of this paper is to provide a general process for human model analysis in the digital mock-up environment. It is also intended to provide some basic guidelines for the use and application of human models. This document is intended for anyone who will be performing human model analyses. It is assumed that the person performing the analysis has at least a minimal level of training in the use of the software involved. Note that this document is limited to anthropometric and ergonomic modeling.
Technical Paper

Payload Attach System for the ISS - Development and Verification for EVA Operations

1999-07-12
1999-01-2037
The process of developing a Payload Attach System (PAS) which will support a wide range of experimental and commercial payloads on the International Space Station (ISS) has experienced an interesting evolution during its design, development, test and evaluation (DDT&E) phase. This evolution has been caused in large measure by requirements intended to insure compatibility of the PAS with the extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmember during nominal and contingency operations in and around the PAS sites. As the design of the ISS transitioned from its Freedom predecessor, the effort to keep costs down by preserving as much of the original Freedom design as possible led to design decisions that challenged engineering thinking.
Technical Paper

Experience with a Geometry Programming Language for CFD Applications

1998-09-28
985572
The Boeing Aero Grid and Paneling System (AGPS) is a programming language with built-in geometry features. Accessible through either a graphical user interface (GUI) or through a command line, AGPS can be used by operators with different levels of experience. Distributed with AGPS are approximately 300,000 lines of macros, or command files, which automate many engineering design and analysis tasks. Most command files were developed to produce inputs to engineering analysis codes such as A502 [1] and TRANAIR [2]. In many cases, command files have been grouped together in AGPS “packages,” which offer users simple menu pick and dialog options to automate entire engineering processes.
Technical Paper

Machine Readable Coding of 777 Wing Fastening Systems Tooling

1998-09-15
982133
This paper presents a detailed overview of the advantages and benefits of using 2-D barcodes, called Data Matrix codes, on Wing Fastening System (WFS) Tooling. This project was conducted on, but not limited to, the 777 Wing Fastening System (GEMCOR) tooling including the drills, fingers, and button dies. This paper will show how using Data Matrix codes to identify tooling will: Eliminate excessive downtime due to the operator using the incorrect tooling for a given tool setup. Reduce the cost associated with panel rework due to the use of incorrect tooling. Reduce the cost associated with excessive tool inventory or last minute ordering to keep up with production needs. Track tool life information for each specific tool. Provide operators with an easy to use tool setup reference document. And provide the factory with the ability to trace panel damage or defects back to the specific machine and exact tooling used.
Technical Paper

Airplane Flow-Field Measurements

1997-10-01
975535
The utility of airplane flow-field measurements for wind-tunnel testing is reviewed. The methods and equipment developed at Boeing for these measurements are also described. The details of the latest system are presented along with typical results from recent wind-tunnel tests. Using the latest system, flow-field surveys of airplane configurations in industrial low-speed and transonic wind tunnels provide spatial distributions of lift and drag (profile and induced) with good repeatability. In addition, the probe speed and survey region is optimized so that typical full-wake surveys take 20-30 minutes to complete. Final data, displayed as total pressure, velocity vectors, vorticity contours, and distributions of lift and drag (profile and induced) are available approximately 10 minutes after survey completion.
Technical Paper

Evolution to Lean Manufacturing A Case Study of Boeing of Spokane

1997-06-03
972235
The evolution of a manufacturing organization toward “Lean” manufacturing does not necessarily come cheaply or quickly. It is the experience at Boeing that technology and different visions can dramatically impact the evolutionary process-consuming great amounts of time and resources. The Boeing of Spokane case study, where aircraft floor panels are manufactured1, is but one of several case studies that suggests moving to “Lean” manufacturing is usually done in large steps, not small ones. These initial steps can be costly unless the systems (equipment and workforce) are flexible. Workforce flexibility is dependent on the attitude in the workforce as both touch and support labor move from their comfort zone to try new approaches and job descriptions. The workforce must be properly motivated to make the change. The equipment must also be flexible in adapting to new line layouts, product mixes, and process change or large cost penalties will be incurred.
Technical Paper

ETOPS and Service Ready Standards and Processes

1992-10-01
921919
A review of the current extended-range twin-engine operations (ETOPS) and the modifications to the standards and processes that led to its successful operational record has contributed to the feasibility of developing an airplane and preparing an operator for ETOPS at entry into service. The airplane and engine manufacturers and component suppliers have continued to expand on these modified standards and processes in their design, build, test and support programs to meet regulatory authority ETOPS requirements and to facilitate the development of regulatory authority criteria for substantiating ETOPS capability prior to entry into service. Airlines, in conjunction with the manufacturers, have also developed improved processes that meet regulatory authority requirements for preparing an operator to integrate a new airplane into its existing ETOPS programs at entry into service.
Technical Paper

Test Results of the Effects of Air Ionization on Cigarette Smoke Particulate Levels Within a Commercial Airplane

1992-07-01
921183
Passengers and flight attendants often notice a haze of smoke under the overhead stowage bins in aircraft cabins when cigarette smoking is allowed. As normally operated, the ventilation system in Boeing 737/757 aircraft does not rapidly remove this smoke haze. Air ionization systems from three vendors were tested in a 10 foot long Boeing 737/757 cabin test section with a cruise condition ventilation rate and two cigarette smoking rates to assess their effectiveness in removing smoke haze from the local breathing areas of passengers and flight attendants. Smoke particulate densities were monitored at five breathing areas and at an exit grill in the test section. All of the ionization systems significantly increased the rate of smoke removal after smoking had stopped, increasing the removal rate by about 25%. None of the systems showed a statistically significant reduction of smoke levels at the individual monitoring points while cigarettes were being smoked.
Technical Paper

Engine Maintenance Cost Reduction Through Improved Component Design and Development

1975-02-01
750621
High maintenance costs of the three 40,000 lb. thrust class aircraft engines manufactured by Pratt and Whitney, General Electric, and Rolls-Royce are discussed. Primary emphasis is on existing engine problems which contribute to high shop visit rate. Maintenance cost in terms of monetary value is not discussed. Concludes that increased emphasis on total life cycle durability is necessary by the engine manufacturers. Recommends higher level of priority be given durability in design and analysis, pre-production proof-of-design testing, and engine program management.
Technical Paper

Potentials for Advanced Civil Transport Aircraft

1973-02-01
730958
In this lecture, a review of Boeing commercial transport models is presented in chronological order from the B-1 flying boat of 1919 to the 747. The problems of air transport systems including convenience, reliability, safety, comfort, performance, and financial and environmental costs are discussed. The probability of more severe future problems is considered, and suggestions are offered as to technology and system improvements which may need to be pursued if civil air transport systems are to continue to provide fast, convenient transportation with a high level of public acceptance.
Technical Paper

Aircraft Noise, Its Source and Reduction

1971-02-01
710308
Since the advent of the turbojet engine, there has been much research by aircraft and engine manufacturers into the source of aircraft noise and its reduction. A review of this research is presented delineating the transition from turbojet engines to turbofan engines to the high by-pass ratio engines being introduced today, and the progress that has been made. Application of the current state-of-the-art to existing airplanes through engine replacement, nacelle retrofit, and flight procedures are also discussed.
Technical Paper

A Progress Report on the Development of an Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft

1971-02-01
710757
The joint development of an augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft by NASA and the Canadian Government Department of Industry, Trade, and Commerce has progressed to the point that the design of the modifications to the de Havilland C-8A Buffalo are complete and the engines are being tested. The predicted performance shows that the airplane will be able to take off and land in less than 1500 ft. Simulation studies indicate that the handling qualities of the airplane, with stability augmentation, will be acceptable for STOL research missions.
Technical Paper

High Altitude Performance of High Bypass Ratio Engines - an Airframe Manufacturer's Point of View

1969-02-01
690652
The traditional method of determining the net thrust of an engine in cruise is explained. It is shown to result in a satisfactory net thrust uncertainty for jet and low bypass ratio engines but to be unsuitable for high bypass ratio engines. A redefinition of net thrust results in a new thrust determination method, called continuity method, which yields acceptable levels of net thrust uncertainty. The new method no longer requires supporting tests in a simulated altitude facility. The question is raised whether in future programs the demonstration of guaranteed cruise performance of an engine should not be carried out in flight tests rather than in an altitude test facility.
Technical Paper

Incipient Failure Detection - The Detection of Certain Contaminating Processes

1967-02-01
670633
Three separate and distinct electrolytic and one galvanic process were identified by visual inspection, metallographic, electron microprobe, and x-ray diffraction analysis in a clocked, flip-flop integrated circuit flat pack and/or the associated printed circuit test jig (two on flat pack and two on circuit board). These four processes were all found to be detectable by the use of noise measurements in microvolts per root cycle at 1000 Hz (cycles per second). The direct current applied for noise measurement to the integrated circuit devices was 100 micro-amperes, as compared to the 6-8 milliamperes required for normal operation. After initial experimentation, the devices were caused to fail in a laboratory ambient environment, followed by an acceleration of the rate of electrolytic reaction through the use of essentially 100 percent relative humidity, versus the upper specification limit of 80 to 98% relative humidity.
Technical Paper

Composite Structure for Orbiting Space Stations

1964-01-01
640291
An overview of composite structure required for manned orbiting space stations is presented. Following a brief introduction of typical configurations and major subsystems, the major structural areas requiring composite structure and their particular functions and requirements are discussed. A summary weight breakdown is presented to assess the dependence of launch weight on these areas. To illustrate, the primary wall composite structure is presented in detail. The design interplay of boost, pressure, meteoroid, radiation, and thermal control requirements are presented. Resultant composite structure for each remaining major structural area is presented in summary form with a brief description of typical design compromises required.
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