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Technical Paper

Examination of High Frequency Characterization Methods for Mounts

2001-04-30
2001-01-1444
The knowledge of frequency-dependent dynamic stiffnesses of mounts, in axial and flexural motions, is needed to determine the behavior of many automotive sub-systems. Consequently, characterization and modeling of vibration isolators is increasingly becoming more important in mid and high frequency regimes where very few methods are known to exist. This paper critically examines some of the approximate identification methods that have been proposed in the literature. Then we present a new experimental identification method that yields frequency-dependent multi-dimensional dynamic stiffnesses of an isolator. The scope is however limited to a linear time-invariant system and our analysis is restricted to the frequency domain. The new characterization method uses two inertial elements at both ends of an isolator and free boundary conditions are maintained during testing.
Technical Paper

Flow-Acoustic Coupling in Quarter-Wave Resonators Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

2001-04-30
2001-01-1430
Quarter-wave resonators are commonly used as acoustic silencers in automotive air induction systems. Similar closed side branches can also be formed in the idle air bypass, exhaust gas recirculation, and positive crankcase ventilation systems of engines. The presence of a mean flow across these side branches can lead to an interaction between the mean flow and the acoustic resonances of the side branch. At discrete flow conditions, this coupling between the flow and acoustic fields may produce high amplitude acoustic pressure pulsations. For the quarter-wave resonator, this interaction can turn the silencer into a noise generator, while for systems where a valve is located at the closed end of the side branch the large pressure pulsations can cause the valve to fail. This phenomenon is not limited to automotive applications, and also occurs in natural gas pipelines, aircraft, and numerous other internal and external flows.
Technical Paper

Acoustic Attenuation Performance of Perforated Absorbing Silencers

2001-04-30
2001-01-1435
The acoustic attenuation performance of a single-pass, perforated concentric silencer filled with continuous strand fibers is investigated theoretically and experimentally. One-dimensional analytical and three-dimensional boundary element methods are employed to predict the acoustic attenuation in the absence of mean flow. Measured complex characteristic impedance and wave number are used to account for the wave propagation through absorbing fiber. The perforation impedance facing the fiber is also presented in terms of the complex characteristic impedance and wave number. The effects of perforate duct porosity and the fiber density are examined. Comparisons of predictions with the experiments illustrate the need for multidimensional analysis at higher frequencies, while the one-dimensional treatment provides a reasonable accuracy at lower frequencies, as expected. The study also shows a significant improvement in the acoustic attenuation of the silencer due to fiber absorption.
Technical Paper

Vibro-Acoustic Effects of Friction in Gears: An Experimental Investigation

2001-04-30
2001-01-1516
Amongst various sources of noise and vibrations in gear meshing, transmission error and sliding friction between the teeth are two major constituents. As the operating conditions are altered, the magnitude of these two excitations is affected differently and either of them can become the dominant factor. In this article, an experimental investigation is presented for identifying the friction excitation and to study the influence of tribological parameters on the radiated sound. Since both friction and transmission error excitations occur at the same fundamental period of one meshing cycle, they result in similar spectral contents in the dynamic response. Hence specific methods like the variation of parameters are designed in order to distinguish between the individual vibration and noise sources. The two main tribological parameters that are varied are the lubricant and the surface finish characteristics of gear teeth.
Technical Paper

Vibration Power Transmission Through Multi-Dimensional Isolation Paths Over High Frequencies

2001-04-30
2001-01-1452
In many vibration isolation problems, translational motion has been regarded as a major contributor to the energy transmitted from a source to a receiver. However, the rotational components of isolation paths must be incorporated as the frequency range of interest increases. This article focuses on the flexural motion of an elastomeric isolator but the longitudinal motion is also considered. In this study, the isolator is modeled using the Timoshenko beam theory (flexural motion) and the wave equation (longitudinal motion), and linear, time-invariant system assumption is made throughout this study. Two different frequency response characteristics of an elastomeric isolator are predicted by the Timoshenko beam theory and are compared with its subsets. A rigid body is employed for the source and the receiver is modeled using two alternate formulations: an infinite beam and then a finite beam. Power transmission efficiency concept is employed to quantify the isolation achieved.
Technical Paper

Effect of Viscoelastic Patch Damping on Casing Cover Dynamics

2001-04-30
2001-01-1463
Many automotive components and sub-systems require viscoelastic damping treatments to control noise and vibration characteristics. To aid the dynamic design process, new approaches are needed for modeling of partial damping treatments and characterization of the overall dynamic behavior. The analytical component of the design process is illustrated via the transmission casing cover, along with supporting experiments. First, the vibration response of production casing plates is examined, with and without the constrained layer treatment. A modified flat plate is employed along with a generic housing that provides the realistic boundary conditions for subsequent work. A simplified analytical damping model for constrained viscoelastic layer damping is suggested based on assumed modal functions. Using the analytical model, design guidelines in terms of optimal patch shapes and locations are suggested.
Technical Paper

Applications of Computer Simulations for Part and Process Design for Automotive Stampings

1997-02-24
970985
Recent studies in sheet metal forming, conducted at universities world wide, emphasize the development of computer aided techniques for process simulation. To be practical and acceptable in a production environment, these codes must be easy to use and allow relatively quick solutions. Often, it is not necessary to make exact predictions but rather to establish the influence of process variables upon part quality, tool stresses, material flow, and material thickness variation. In cooperation with its industrial partners, the ERC for Net Shape Manufacturing of the Ohio State University has applied a number of computer codes for analysis and design of sheet metal forming operations. This paper gives a few selected examples taken from automotive applications and illustrates practical uses of computer simulations to improve productivity and reduce tool development and manufacturing costs.
Technical Paper

Dynamic Modeling and Characterization of Transmission Response for Controller Design

1998-02-23
981094
Electronic closed loop control of automatic transmission functions can potentially benefit from the use of quantitative models of transmission response in a form compatible with controller design procedures. Transmission dynamic response during gear shifts of a discrete-ratio transmission is nonlinear. Procedures for developing linearized dynamic models are applied to the simulation of the nonlinear model of a representative power train during the inertia phase of a shift. The frequency responses for the resulting linear models are examined, and their implications for controller design are noted.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of Mixture Formation Processes During Start-Up of a Natural Gas Powered SI Engine

1998-05-04
981387
The mixture formation processes of methane and air in an optical access engine operating steadily at 200 RPM have been explored in order to study charge inhomogeneity in a natural gas powered spark ignition engine during transient engine cranking. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence has been used to create fuel/air equivalence ratio maps as a function of injection timing for various image planes at intervals throughout the intake and compression strokes. The work has been done using a Honda VTEC-E engine head that features port injection, four valves per cylinder, a pentroof style combustion chamber for the generation of tumble motion, and one nearly deactivated intake valve to generate swirl motion at low engine speeds in order to enhance mixing.
Technical Paper

Corner Design in Deep Drawn Rectangular Parts

1997-02-24
970437
The influence of die corner geometry on the attainable draw depth of rectangular parts was investigated using 3-D FEM and optimum rectangular blanks. Axisymmetric cup analysis was not adequate because a corner assist effect promotes corner draw. Guidelines for selecting corner radius were developed and the sensitivities of the maximum part depth to other process variables, such as drawbead restraint force; die clearance gap; friction coefficient; strain rate sensitivity; material anisotropy; and strain hardening exponent, were simulated. The results are much more conservative than handbook rules, which to not to take into account the details of blank size, drawbead restraint, die geometry, material properties, and friction.
Technical Paper

Engine and Load Torque Estimation with Application to Electronic Throttle Control

1998-02-23
980795
Electronic throttle control is increasingly being considered as a viable alternative to conventional air management systems in modern spark-ignition engines. In such a scheme, driver throttle commands are interpreted by the powertrain control module together with many other inputs; rather than directly commanding throttle position, the driver is now simply requesting torque - a request that needs to be appropriately interpreted by the control module. Engine management under these conditions will require optimal control of the engine torque required by the various vehicle subsystems, ranging from HVAC, to electrical and hydraulic accessories, to the vehicle itself. In this context, the real-time estimation of engine and load torque can play a very important role, especially if this estimation can be performed using the same signals already available to the powertrain control module.
Technical Paper

The Ohio State University Automated Highway System Demonstration Vehicle

1998-02-23
980855
The Ohio State University Center for Intelligent Transportation Research (CITR) has developed three automated vehicles demonstrating advanced cruise control, automated steering control for lane keeping, and autonomous behavior including automated stopping and lane changes in reaction to other vehicles. Various sensors were used, including a radar reflective stripe system and a vision based system for lane position sensing, a radar system and a scanning laser rangefinding system for the detection of objects ahead of the vehicle, and various supporting sensors including side looking radars and an angular rate gyroscope. These vehicles were demonstrated at the National Automated Highway System Consortium (NAHSC) 1997 Technical Feasibility Demonstration in a scenario involving mixed autonomous and manually driven vehicles. This paper describes the demonstration, the vehicle sensing, control, and computational hardware, and the vehicle control software.
Technical Paper

Dynamic Evolution of the 3-D Flow Field During the Latter Part of the Intake Stroke in an IC Engine

1998-02-23
980485
Measurements of the temporal evolution of the 3-D velocity field were performed in an IC engine during the latter part of the intake stroke using a Water Analog Engine Simulation Rig and the 3-D Particle Tracking Velocimetry technique (3-D PTV). The engine head tested was a typical 4 valve, pent-roof type combustion chamber shape with slightly asymmetric intake passages to favor a preferred swirl with one intake valve almost deactivated to reinforce the swirling flow pattern. This study was aimed at characterizing the dynamic development of the flow field resulting from this head geometry and asymmetric valve event during the latter part of the intake stroke. The most salient feature of this flow field is that this final, highly organized and energetic vortex does not emerge until relatively late in the intake stroke. Even as late at 60° BBDC, the flow field is still characterized by smaller (of the order of 1/4 or 1/3 of the bore size) structures, particularly in the tumble plane.
Technical Paper

AFR Control on a Single Cylinder Engine Using the Ionization Current

1998-02-23
980203
Over the years numerous researchers have suggested that the ionization current signal carries within it combustion relevant information. The possibility of using this signal for diagnostics and control provides motivation for continued research in this area. To be able to use the ion current signal for feedback control a reliable estimate of some combustion related parameter is necessary and therein lies the difficulty. Given the nature of the ion current signal this is not a trivial task. Fei An et al. [1] employed PCA for feature extraction and then used these feature vectors to design a neural network based classifier for the estimation of air to fuel ratio (AFR). Although the classifier predicted AFR with sufficient reliability, a major draw back was that the ion current signals used for prediction were averaged signals thus precluding a cycle to cycle estimate of AFR.
Technical Paper

A Fuzzy Decision-Making System for Automotive Application

1998-02-23
980519
Fault diagnosis for automotive systems is driven by government regulations, vehicle repairability, and customer satisfaction. Several methods have been developed to detect and isolate faults in automotive systems, subsystems and components with special emphasis on those faults that affect the exhaust gas emission levels. Limit checks, model-based, and knowledge-based methods are applied for diagnosing malfunctions in emission control systems. Incipient and partial faults may be hard to detect when using a detection scheme that implements any of the previously mentioned methods individually; the integration of model-based and knowledge-based diagnostic methods may provide a more robust approach. In the present paper, use is made of fuzzy residual evaluation and of a fuzzy expert system to improve the performance of a fault detection method based on a mathematical model of the engine.
Technical Paper

Fault Diagnosis Of Steering System For Advanced Vehicle Control Systems

1998-02-23
980604
The viability of many new technologies for improving the drivability and safety of a vehicle has improved with the availability of advanced software and hardware tools. On-line diagnosis of steering system faults is one such area on which a lot of attention has been focused. When used in a manually driven automobile this technology can improve the safety of the vehicle by providing the driver with the fault information. While when used with a computer controlled steering (as envisaged in many of the IVHS technologies) it is of even greater importance, because electronic fault information is crucial to the proper functioning of many such systems. This paper deals with the design of a linear unknown input observer (UIO) based residual generator for steering system diagnosis. The observer was designed based on an accepted model of the automatic car steering problem. The observer was validated through experiments conducted on the OSU-autonomous vehicle.
Technical Paper

Process Simulation to Improve Quality and Increase Productivity in Rolling, Ring Rolling and Forging

1991-02-01
910142
The practical and proven use of computers in forming technology include: CAD/CAM for die making; transfer of geometric data from the customer's CAD/CAM system to that of the supplier and vice versa; application of artificial intelligence and expert systems for part and process design; simulation of metal flow to eliminate forging defects; prediction and optimization of process variables; and analysis of stresses in dies as well as prevention of premature die failure. Intelligent use of this information can lead to significant gains in product quality and productivity. This paper presents three examples of application of process simulation to forming : rolling, ring rolling and forging.
Technical Paper

Analysis and Development of A Real-Time Control Methodology in Resistance Spot Welding

1991-02-01
910191
The single-parameter, in-process monitor and automatic control systems for the resistance spot welding process have been studied by many investigators. Some of these have already been commercialized and used by sheet metal fabricators. These control systems operate primarily on one of the three process parameters: maximum voltage or voltage drop, dynamic resistance, or thermal expansion between electrodes during nugget formation. Control systems based on voltage or dynamic resistance have been successfully implemented for industrial applications. A great amount of experience on these two control methods has been accumulated through trial-and-error approaches. The expansion-based control system is not commonly utilized due to lack of experience and understanding of the process. Since the expansion displacement between electrodes during welding responds directly to the weld nugget formation, this control parameter provides a better means to produce more precise spot welds.
Technical Paper

Planning Ohio's Transportation Research Center

1968-02-01
680166
Planning is proceeding on the research and development programs for Ohio's Transportation Research Center and on its physical layout. This 5600 acre research complex will contain some 60-70 miles of roadways, an extensive building complex and a 6000 ft airstrip. The planning includes: establishing an overall framework within which research and development demands can be related to available and potential resources; determining the nature, magnitude, and urgency of demands and the nature, quality, and quantity of resources; identifying constraints on future operation: establishing the payoff of alternative programs; selecting final short- and long-term programs and optimal physical layout.
Technical Paper

Testing and Validation of a Belted Alternator System for a Post-Transmission Parallel PHEV for the EcoCAR 3 Competition

2017-03-28
2017-01-1263
The Ohio State University EcoCAR 3 team is building a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) post-transmission parallel 2016 Chevrolet Camaro. With the end-goal of improving fuel economy and reducing tail pipe emissions, the Ohio State Camaro has been fitted with a 32 kW alternator-starter belt coupled to a 119 kW 2.0L GDI I4 engine that runs on 85% ethanol (E85). The belted alternator starter (BAS) which aids engine start-stop operation, series mode and torque assist, is powered by an 18.9 kWh Lithium Iron Phosphate energy storage system, and controlled by a DC-AC inverter/controller. This report details the modeling, calibration, testing and validation work done by the Ohio State team to fast track development of the BAS system in Year 2 of the competition.
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