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Video

Characterization of a New Advanced Diesel Oxidation Catalyst with Low Temperature NOx Storage Capability for LD Diesel

2012-06-18
Currently, two consolidated aftertreatment technologies are available for the reduction of NOx emissions from diesel engines: Urea SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) systems and LNT (Lean NOx Trap) systems. Urea SCR technology, which has been widely used for many years at stationary sources, is becoming nowadays an attractive alternative also for light-duty diesel applications. However, SCR systems are much more effective in NOx reduction efficiency at high load operating conditions than light load condition, characterized by lower exhaust gas temperatures.
Video

Analysis of Various Operating Strategies for a Parallel-Hybrid Diesel Powertrain with a Belt Alternator Starter

2012-05-30
The sustainable use of energy and the reduction of pollutant emissions are main concerns of the automotive industry. In this context, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) offer significant improvements in the efficiency of the propulsion system and allow advanced strategies to reduce pollutant and noise emissions. The paper presents the results of a simulation study that addresses the minimization of fuel consumption, NOx emissions and combustion noise of a medium size passenger car. Such a vehicle has a parallel-hybrid diesel powertrain with a high-voltage belt alternator starter. The simulation reproduces real-driver behavior through a dynamic modeling approach and actuates an automatic power split between the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) and the Electric Machine (EM). Typical characteristics of parallel hybrid technologies, such as Stop&Start, regenerative braking and electric power assistance, are implemented via an operating strategy that is based on the reduction of total losses.
Technical Paper

Combining Flow Losses at Circular T-Junctions Representative of Intake Plenum and Primary Runner Interface

2007-04-16
2007-01-0649
The interface between a plenum and primary runner in log-style intake manifolds is one of the dominant sources of flow losses in the breathing system of Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). A right-angled T-junction is one such interface between the plenum (main duct) and the primary runner (sidebranch) normal to the plenum's axis. The present study investigates losses associated with the combining flow through these junctions, where fluid from both sides of the plenum enters the primary runner. Steady, incompressible-flow experiments for junctions with circular cross-sections were conducted to determine the effect of (1) runner interface radius of 0, 10, and 20% of the plenum diameter, (2) plenum-to-runner area ratio of 1, 2.124, and 3.117, and (3) runner taper area ratio of 2.124 and 3.117. Mass flow rate in each branch was varied to obtain a distribution of flow ratios, while keeping the total flow rate constant.
Technical Paper

Common Rail without Accumulator: Development, Theoretical-Experimental Analysis and Performance Enhancement at DI-HCCI Level of a New Generation FIS

2007-04-16
2007-01-1258
An innovative hydraulic layout for Common Rail (C.R.) fuel injection systems was proposed and realized. The rail was replaced by a high-pressure pipe junction to have faster dynamic system response during engine transients, smaller pressure induced stresses and sensibly reduced production costs. Compared to a commercial rail, whose inside volume ranges from 20 to 40 cm3, such a junction provided a hydraulic capacitance of about 2 cm3 and had the main function of connecting the pump delivery to the electroinjector feeding pipes. In the design of the novel FIS layout, the choice of high-pressure pipe dimensions was critical for system performance optimization. Injector supplying pipes with length and inner diameter out of the actual production range were selected and applied, for stabilizing the system pressure level during an injection event and reduce pressure wave oscillations.
Technical Paper

Performance of Combination Particulate/Gaseous Contaminant Air Filters in the Highway and Street Traffic Environment

2007-04-16
2007-01-1425
Automotive cabin filters of the “combo” type are intended to remove both aerosols and gaseous contaminants from air entering the climate control system. We analyze the performance of two filters of this type, using published values for the concentration of gaseous contaminants found in highway and street traffic. Using existing expressions for the performance of activated carbons, including the effects of contaminant concentration, flow rate and carbon bed depth, we calculate retentivity and breakthrough time for benzene and carbon tetrachloride at street-level concentrations. The calculated factors are compared to published test data on similar filters.
Technical Paper

An Objective Evaluation of the Comfort During the Gear Change Process

2007-04-16
2007-01-1584
This paper presents the methodology adopted by Politecnico di Torino Vehicle Dynamics Research Team to obtain objective indices for the evaluation of the comfort during the gear change process. Some test drivers and different passengers traveled on a test vehicle and assigned marks on the basis of their subjective feeling of comfort during the gearshifts. The comparison between the most significant subjective evaluations and the experimental values obtained by the instruments located on the vehicle is presented. As a consequence, some indices (based on physical parameters) to evaluate the efficiency and the comfort of the gearshift process are obtained. They are in good agreement with the subjective evaluations of the drivers and the passengers. The second part of the paper presents a driveline and vehicle model which was conceived to reproduce the phenomena experimented on the vehicle. The experimental validation of the model is presented.
Technical Paper

Transient Clunk Response of a Driveline System: Laboratory Experiment and Analytical Studies

2007-05-15
2007-01-2233
A laboratory experiment is designed to examine the clunk phenomenon. A static torque is applied to a driveline system via the mass of an overhanging torsion bar and electromagnet. Then an applied load may be varied via attached mass and released to simulate the step down (tip-out) response of the system. Shaft torques and torsional and translational accelerations are recorded at pre-defined locations. The static torque closes up the driveline clearances in the pinion/ring (crown wheel) mesh. With release of the applied load the driveline undergoes transient vibration. Further, the ratio of preload to static load is adjusted to lead to either no-impact or impact events. Test A provides a ‘linear’ result where the contact stiffness does not pass into clearance. This test is used for confirming transient response and studying friction and damping. Test B is for mass release with sufficient applied torque to pass into clearance, allowing the study of the clunk.
Technical Paper

Identification of Modal Parameters in Frequency Domain with Emphasis on Output Only Cross-Spectral Density Functions

2007-05-15
2007-01-2382
This paper presents a technique for extracting modal parameters of a linear multi degree of freedom system in the frequency domain. The roots of the technique are the well known rational fraction polynomials method but emphasis is given to the application to output-only data in the form of cross-spectral density functions. A discussion is presented on the possibility of achieving reliable results also for structures undergoing multiple input excitations. Numerical stability of the technique is obtained by properly scaling both the frequency and the cross-spectrum axes. Good performance of the method are shown for numerical examples and for a test case on an actual structure.
Technical Paper

Effect of Viscoelastic Patch Damping on Casing Cover Dynamics

2001-04-30
2001-01-1463
Many automotive components and sub-systems require viscoelastic damping treatments to control noise and vibration characteristics. To aid the dynamic design process, new approaches are needed for modeling of partial damping treatments and characterization of the overall dynamic behavior. The analytical component of the design process is illustrated via the transmission casing cover, along with supporting experiments. First, the vibration response of production casing plates is examined, with and without the constrained layer treatment. A modified flat plate is employed along with a generic housing that provides the realistic boundary conditions for subsequent work. A simplified analytical damping model for constrained viscoelastic layer damping is suggested based on assumed modal functions. Using the analytical model, design guidelines in terms of optimal patch shapes and locations are suggested.
Technical Paper

Examination of High Frequency Characterization Methods for Mounts

2001-04-30
2001-01-1444
The knowledge of frequency-dependent dynamic stiffnesses of mounts, in axial and flexural motions, is needed to determine the behavior of many automotive sub-systems. Consequently, characterization and modeling of vibration isolators is increasingly becoming more important in mid and high frequency regimes where very few methods are known to exist. This paper critically examines some of the approximate identification methods that have been proposed in the literature. Then we present a new experimental identification method that yields frequency-dependent multi-dimensional dynamic stiffnesses of an isolator. The scope is however limited to a linear time-invariant system and our analysis is restricted to the frequency domain. The new characterization method uses two inertial elements at both ends of an isolator and free boundary conditions are maintained during testing.
Technical Paper

Vibration Power Transmission Through Multi-Dimensional Isolation Paths Over High Frequencies

2001-04-30
2001-01-1452
In many vibration isolation problems, translational motion has been regarded as a major contributor to the energy transmitted from a source to a receiver. However, the rotational components of isolation paths must be incorporated as the frequency range of interest increases. This article focuses on the flexural motion of an elastomeric isolator but the longitudinal motion is also considered. In this study, the isolator is modeled using the Timoshenko beam theory (flexural motion) and the wave equation (longitudinal motion), and linear, time-invariant system assumption is made throughout this study. Two different frequency response characteristics of an elastomeric isolator are predicted by the Timoshenko beam theory and are compared with its subsets. A rigid body is employed for the source and the receiver is modeled using two alternate formulations: an infinite beam and then a finite beam. Power transmission efficiency concept is employed to quantify the isolation achieved.
Technical Paper

Vibro-Acoustic Effects of Friction in Gears: An Experimental Investigation

2001-04-30
2001-01-1516
Amongst various sources of noise and vibrations in gear meshing, transmission error and sliding friction between the teeth are two major constituents. As the operating conditions are altered, the magnitude of these two excitations is affected differently and either of them can become the dominant factor. In this article, an experimental investigation is presented for identifying the friction excitation and to study the influence of tribological parameters on the radiated sound. Since both friction and transmission error excitations occur at the same fundamental period of one meshing cycle, they result in similar spectral contents in the dynamic response. Hence specific methods like the variation of parameters are designed in order to distinguish between the individual vibration and noise sources. The two main tribological parameters that are varied are the lubricant and the surface finish characteristics of gear teeth.
Technical Paper

Refinements of a Heavy Truck ABS Model

2007-04-16
2007-01-0839
In 2004, a model of a 6s6m ABS controller was developed in order to support NHTSA's efforts in the study of heavy truck braking performance. This model was developed using Simulink and interfaced with TruckSim, a vehicle dynamics software package, in order to create an accurate braking simulation of a 6×4 Peterbilt straight truck. For this study, the vehicle model braking dynamics were improved and the ABS controller model was refined. Also, the controller was made adaptable to ABS configurations other than 6s6m, such as 4s4m and 4s3m. Controller models were finally validated to experimental data from the Peterbilt truck, gathered at NHTSA's Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC).
Technical Paper

Development and Verification of Suspension Parameters for The Ohio State Buckeye Bullet 2 Land Speed Vehicle

2007-04-16
2007-01-0814
The Buckeye Bullet set domestic as well as international speed records for electric vehicles in 2004. The next generation of land speed vehicle from Ohio State called the Buckeye Bullet 2 (henceforth the BB2) will again challenge and hopefully achieve several new speed records. The Buckeye Bullet suspension worked relatively well but was found to not be quite optimal for the vehicle. The purpose of the work outlined here was to develop a new front and rear suspension for the BB2 that would be an improvement over the suspension of the original Bullet. Previous to the start of this work part of the suspension had already been designed in the form of an upright/control arm setup. This paper works on taking the suspension to completion from this point of design. Work done includes developing the final design, determining suspension parameters, building an ADAMS model, and testing the ADAMS model.
Technical Paper

Development and Implementation of a Path-Following Algorithm for an Autonomous Vehicle

2007-04-16
2007-01-0815
This paper describes the development and implementation of an accurate and repeatable path-following algorithm focused ultimately on vehicle testing. A compact, lightweight, and portable hardware package allows easy installation and negligible impact on the vehicle mass, even for the smallest automobile. Innovative features include the ability to generate a smooth, evenly-spaced path vector regardless the quality of the given path. The algorithm proposed in this work is suitable for testing in a controlled environment. The system was evaluated in simulation and performed well in road tests at low speeds.
Technical Paper

Automated Steering Controller for Vehicle Testing

2007-08-05
2007-01-3647
Automating road vehicle control can increase the range and reliability of dynamic testing. Some tests, for instance, specify precise steering inputs which human test drivers are only able to approximate, adding uncertainty to the test results. An automated steering system has been developed which is capable of removing these limitations. This system enables any production car or light truck to follow a user-defined path, using global position feedback, or to perform specific steering sequences with excellent repeatability. The system adapts itself to a given vehicle s handling characteristics, and it can be installed and uninstalled quickly without damage or permanent modification to the vehicle.
Technical Paper

Effect of Intake Primary Runner Blockages on Combustion Characteristics and Emissions with Stoichiometric and EGR-diluted Mixtures in SI Engines

2007-10-29
2007-01-3992
In-cylinder charge motion is known to significantly increase turbulence intensity, accelerate combustion rate, and reduce cyclic variation. This, in turn, extends the tolerance to exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), while the introduction of EGR results in much lowered nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and reduced fuel consumption. The present study investigates the effect of charge motion in a spark ignition engine on fuel consumption, combustion, and engine-out emissions with stoichiometric and EGR-diluted mixtures under part-load operating conditions. Experiments have been performed with a Chrysler 2.4L 4-valve I4 engine under 2.41 bar brake mean effective pressure at 1600 rpm over a spark range around maximum brake torque timing. The primary intake runners are partially blocked to create different levels of tumble, swirl, and cross-tumble (swumble) motion in the cylinder before ignition.
Technical Paper

DPF Supporting Nano-Structured Perovskite Catalysts for NOx and Diesel Soot Emission Control in Commercial Vehicles

2007-10-30
2007-01-4173
Nano-structured perovskite-type oxides catalysts La1-xAxFe1-yByO3 (where A = Na, K, Rb and B = Cu), prepared by the Solution Combustion Synthesis (SCS) method and characterized by BET, XRD, FESEM, AAS and catalytic activity tests in microreactors and engine bench, proved to be effective in the simultaneous removal of soot and NO, the two prevalent pollutants in diesel exhaust gases in the temperature range 350-450°C. The best compromise between soot and nitrogen oxide abatement was shown by La-K-Cu-FeO3 catalyst which displayed the highest catalytic activity towards carbon combustion and the highest NO conversion activity.
Technical Paper

Impact of Tumble on Combustion in SI Engines: Correlation between Flow and Engine Experiments

2007-10-29
2007-01-4003
The introduction of tumble into the combustion chamber is an effective method of enhancing turbulence intensity prior to ignition, thereby accelerating the burn rates, stabilizing the combustion, and extending the dilution limit. In this study, the primary intake runners are partially blocked to produce different levels of tumble motion in the cylinder during the air induction process. Experiments have been performed with a Chrysler 2.4L 4-valve I4 engine at maximum brake torque timing under two operating conditions: 2.41 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) at 1600 rpm, and 0.78 bar BMEP at 1200 rpm. A method has been developed to quantify the tumble characteristics of blockages under steady flow conditions in a flow laboratory, by using the same cylinder head, intake manifold, and tumble blockages from the engine experiments.
Technical Paper

Common Rail HSDI Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions with Fossil / Bio-Derived Fuel Blends

2002-03-04
2002-01-0865
In order to evaluate the potentialities of bioderived diesel fuels, the effect of fueling a 1.9 l displacement HSDI automotive Diesel engine with biodiesel and fossil/biodiesel blend on its emission and combustion characteristics has been investigated. The fuels tested were a typical European diesel, a 50% biodiesel blend in the reference diesel, and a 100% biodiesel, obtained by mixing rape seed methyl ester (RME) and recycled cooking oil (CME). Steady state tests were performed at two different engine speeds (2500 and 4000 rpm), and for a wide range of loads, in order to evaluate the behavior of the fuels under a large number of operating conditions. Engine performance and exhaust emissions were analyzed, along with the combustion process in terms of heat release analysis. Experimental evidences showed appreciably lower CO and HC specific emissions and a substantial increase in NOx levels. A significant reduction of smoke emissions was also obtained.
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