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AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL HEATING SYSTEMS

1965-01-10
HISTORICAL
AIR860
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only.
Standard

Aircraft Electrical Heating Systems

2000-06-01
HISTORICAL
AIR860A
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only. No attempt has been made to develop the complete electrical circuitry associated with the electrical heating components; however, the electrical circuitry required for heating component operation, safety, and monitoring will be included as available. Specific design information is given for various modern aircraft utilizing electrical heating. Each aircraft discussed will be identified by alphabetical letter designation and included in the appropriate appendix.
Standard

Aircraft Electrical Heating Systems

2011-10-17
CURRENT
AIR860B
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only. No attempt has been made to develop the complete electrical circuitry associated with the electrical heating components; however, the electrical circuitry required for heating component operation, safety, and monitoring will be included as available. Specific design information is given for various modern aircraft utilizing electrical heating. Each aircraft discussed will be identified by alphabetical letter designation and included in the appropriate appendix.
Standard

Air Conditioning of Aircraft Cargo

1997-10-01
CURRENT
AIR806B
The report presents air conditioning data for aircraft cargo which is affected by temperature, humidity, ventilation rate and atmospheric pressure. The major emphasis is on conditioning of perishable products and warm-blooded animals. The report also covers topics peculiar to cargo aircraft or which are related to the handling of cargo.
Standard

AIR CONDITIONING OF SUBSONIC AIRCRAFT AT HIGH ALTITUDE

1984-03-01
CURRENT
AIR795A
This report is limited to the special problems of air quantity, purity, movement, pressure, temperature, and humidity which arise from the requirements of the human body during high altitude flight, together with the associated aircraft design problems.
Standard

Electrical and Electronic Equipment Cooling in Commercial Transports

1992-09-01
CURRENT
AIR64B
This document considers the cooling of equipment installed in equipment centers, which usually consist of rack-mounted equipment and panel mounted equipment in the flight deck. In instances where these two locations result in different requirements, these are identified. For purposes of this document, the cooled equipment is referred to generally as E/E equipment, denoting that both electrical and electronic equipment is considered, or as an E/E equipment line-replaceable-unit (LRU). The majority of cooled equipment takes the form of LRUs. This document primarily relates to E/E equipment which is designed to use forced air cooling in order to maintain the equipment within acceptable environmental limits, in order to maintain equipment operating performance (within acceptable tolerances), and to maintain reliability. Cooling may be applied internally or externally to the case of the item of E/E equipment.
Standard

FAULT ISOLATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORTS

1977-08-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1266
This AIR outlines concepts for the design and use of fault isolation equipment that have general application. However, the specific concern applies only to use with Environmental Control Systems in commercial transports. In particular, automatic Built In Test Equipment (BITE) with manual initiation and software programs are covered as systems already in use.
Standard

Fault Isolation in Environmental Control Systems of Commercial Transports

1993-11-01
CURRENT
AIR1266A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) outlines concepts for the design and use of fault isolation equipment that have general application. The specific focus is on fault isolation of environmental control systems (ECS) in commercial transports. Presented are general fault isolation purposes, design principles, and demonstration of compliance criteria. These are followed by three design examples to aid in understanding the design principles. Future trends in built-in-test-equipment (BITE) design are discussed, some of which represent concepts already being implemented on new equipment.
Standard

Transparent Area Washing Systems for Aircraft

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1102A
This information report presents data and recommendations pertaining to the design and development of transparent area washing systems for aircraft.
Standard

The Control of Excess Humidity in Avionics Cooling

2010-06-17
CURRENT
ARP987B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the causes and impacts of moisture and/or condensation in avionics equipment and provides recommendations for corrective and preventative action.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems Terminology

2001-12-14
CURRENT
ARP147E
This ARP provides the definition of terms commonly used in aircraft environmental control system (ECS) design and analysis. Many of the terms may be used as guidelines for establishing standard ECS nomenclature. Some general thermodynamic terms are included that are frequently used in ECS analysis, but this document is not meant to be an inclusive list of such terms.
Standard

Heat Sinks for Airborne Vehicles

2002-09-16
HISTORICAL
AIR1957
This document summarizes types of heat sinks and considerations in relation to the general requirements of aircraft heat sources, and it provides information to achieve efficient utilization and management of these heat sinks. In this document, a heat sink is defined as a body or substance used for removal of the heat generated by hydrodynamic or thermodynamic processes. This document provides general data about airborne heat sources, heat sinks, and modes of heat transfer. The document also discusses approaches to control the use of heat sinks and techniques for analysis and verification of heat sink management. The heat sinks are for aircraft operating at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
Standard

Compartment Decompression Analysis

2017-01-05
CURRENT
AIR5661A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides data and general analysis methods for calculation of internal and external, pressurized and unpressurized airplane compartment pressures during rapid discharge of cabin pressure. References to the applicable current FAA and EASA rules and advisory material are provided. While rules and interpretations can be expected to evolve, numerous airplanes have been approved under current and past rules that will have a continuing need for analysis of production and field modifications, alterations and repairs. The data and basic principles provided by this report are adaptable to any compartment decompression analysis requirement.
Standard

Compartment Decompression Analysis

2010-02-12
HISTORICAL
AIR5661
This report provides data and general analysis methods for calculation of internal and external, pressurized and unpressurized airplane compartment pressures during rapid discharge of cabin pressure. References to the applicable current FAA and EASA rules and advisory material are provided. While rules and interpretations can be expected to evolve, numerous airplanes have been approved under current and past rules that will have a continuing need for analysis of production and field modifications, alterations and repairs. The data and basic principles provided by this report are adaptable to any compartment decompression analysis requirement.
Standard

Guide for Qualification Testing of Aircraft Air Valves

2015-05-29
CURRENT
ARP986D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines recommended analysis and test procedures for qualification of pneumatically, electrically, manually, and hydraulically actuated air valves. They may be further defined as valves that function in response to externally applied forces or in response to variations in upstream and/or downstream duct air conditions in order to maintain a calibrated duct air condition (e.g., air flow, air pressure, air temperature, air pressure ratio, or air shutoff). Qualification testing performed on the airplane to verify compatibility of the valve function and stability as part of a complete system is outside the scope of this document. Refer to ARP1270 for design and certification requirements for cabin pressurization control system components. As this document is only a guide, it does not supersede or relieve any requirements contained in detailed Customer specifications.
Standard

Engine Bleed Air Systems for Aircraft

2007-03-22
HISTORICAL
ARP1796A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, installation environment and design considerations for military and commercial aircraft systems within the Air Transport Association (ATA) ATA 100 specification, Chapter 36, Pneumatic. This ATA system/chapter covers equipment used to deliver compressed air from a power source to connecting points for other systems such as air conditioning, pressurization, ice protection, cross-engine starting, air turbine motors, air driven hydraulic pumps, on board oxygen generating systems (OBOGS), on board inert gas generating systems (OBIGGS), and other pneumatic demands. The engine bleed air system includes components for preconditioning the compressed air (temperature, pressure or flow regulation), ducting to distribute high or low pressure air to the using systems, and sensors/instruments to indicate temperature and pressure levels within the system.
Standard

Engine Bleed Air Systems for Aircraft

2015-07-13
CURRENT
ARP1796B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, installation environment and design considerations for military and commercial aircraft systems within the Air Transport Association (ATA) ATA 100 specification, Chapter 36, Pneumatic. This ATA system/chapter covers equipment used to deliver compressed air from a power source to connecting points for other systems such as air conditioning, pressurization, ice protection, cross-engine starting, air turbine motors, air driven hydraulic pumps, on board oxygen generating systems (OBOGS), on board inert gas generating systems (OBIGGS), and other pneumatic demands. The engine bleed air system includes components for preconditioning the compressed air (temperature, pressure or flow regulation), ducting to distribute high or low pressure air to the using systems, and sensors/instruments to indicate temperature and pressure levels within the system.
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