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Technical Paper

A Bifurcation Analysis of an Open Loop Internal Combustion Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-0194
The process of engine mapping in the automotive industry identifies steady-state engine responses by running an engine at a given operating point (speed and load) until its output has settled. While the time simulating this process with a computational model for one set of parameters is relatively short, the cumulative time to map all possible combinations becomes computationally inefficient. This work presents an alternative method for mapping out the steady-state response of an engine in simulation by applying bifurcation theory. The bifurcation approach used in this work allows the engine’s steady-state response to be traced through the model’s state-parameter space under the simultaneous variation of one or more model parameters. To demonstrate this approach, a bifurcation analysis of a simplified nonlinear engine model is presented.
Technical Paper

A Comparison of Four Modelling Techniques for Thermoelectric Generator

2017-03-28
2017-01-0144
The application of state-of-art thermoelectric generator (TEG) in automotive engine has potential to reduce more than 2% fuel consumption and hence the CO2 emissions. This figure is expected to be increased to 5%~10% in the near future when new thermoelectric material with higher properties is fabricated. However, in order to maximize the TEG output power, there are a few issues need to be considered in the design stage such as the number of modules, the connection of modules, the geometry of the thermoelectric module, the DC-DC converter circuit, the geometry of the heat exchanger especially the hot side heat exchanger etc. These issues can only be investigated via a proper TEG model. The authors introduced four ways of TEG modelling which in the increasing complexity order are MATLB function based model, MATLAB Simscape based Simulink model, GT-power TEG model and CFD STAR-CCM+ model. Both Simscape model and GT-Power model have intrinsic dynamic model performance.
Technical Paper

A Computational and Experimental Investigation into the Effects of Debris on an Inverted Double Wing in Ground Effect

2018-04-03
2018-01-0726
Cars in several motor sports series, such as Formula 1, make use of multi-element front wings to provide downforce. These wings also provide onset flows to other surfaces that generate downforce. These elements are highly loaded to maximise their performance and are generally operating close to stall. Rubber debris, often known as marbles, created from the high slip experienced by the soft compound tyres can become lodged in the multiple elements of a front wing. This will lead to a reduction in the effectiveness of the wing over the course of a race. This work will study the effect of such debris, both experimentally and numerically, on an inverted double element wing in ground effect at representative Reynolds numbers. The wing was mounted at two different ride heights above a fixed false-floor in the Loughborough University wind tunnel and the effect of debris blockage modelled by closing sections of the gap between elements with tape.
Technical Paper

A Direct Comparison between Numerical and Experimental Results for Airborne Noise Levels in Automotive Transmission Rattle

2014-04-01
2014-01-1756
In this paper, a direct correlation between transmission gear rattle experiments and numerical models is presented, particularly focusing on the noise levels (dB) measured from a single gear pair test rig. The rig is placed in a semi-anechoic chamber environment to aid the noise measurements and instrumented with laser vibrometers, accelerometers and free field microphones. The input torsional velocity is provided by an electric motor, which is controlled by a signal generator, aiming to introduce an alternating component onto the otherwise nominal speed; thus, emulating the engine orders found in an internal combustion engine. These harmonic irregularities are conceived to be the triggering factor for gear rattle to occur. Hence, the rig is capable of running under rattling and non-rattling conditions. The numerical model used accounts for the gear pair's torsional dynamics, lubricated impacts between meshing teeth and bearing friction.
Journal Article

A Drag Coefficient for Test Cycle Application

2018-04-03
2018-01-0742
The drag coefficient at zero yaw angle is the single parameter usually used to define the aerodynamic drag characteristics of a passenger car. However, this is usually the minimum drag condition and will, for example, lead to an underestimate of the effect of aerodynamic drag on fuel consumption because the important influence of the natural wind has been excluded. An alternative measure of aerodynamic drag should take into account the effect of nonzero yaw angles and a variant of wind-averaged drag is suggested as the best option. A wind-averaged drag coefficient (CDW) is usually derived for a particular vehicle speed using a representative wind speed distribution. In the particular case where the road speed distribution is specified, as for a drive cycle to determine fuel economy, a relevant drag coefficient can be derived by using a weighted road speed.
Technical Paper

A Fault-Tolerant Processor Core Architecture for Safety-Critical Automotive Applications

2005-04-11
2005-01-0322
The introduction of drive-by-wire systems into modern vehicles has generated new challenges for the designers of embedded systems. These systems, based primarily on microcontrollers, need to achieve very high levels of reliability and availability, but also have to satisfy the strict cost and packaging constraints of the automotive industry. Advances in VLSI technology have allowed the development of single-chip systems, but have also increased the rate of intermittent and transient faults that come as a result of the continuous shrinkage of the CMOS process feature size. This paper presents a low-cost, fault-tolerant system-on-chip architecture suitable for drive-by-wire and other safety-related applications, based on a triple-modular-redundancy configuration at the processor execution pipeline level.
Technical Paper

A Fuel Cell System Sizing Tool Based on Current Production Aircraft

2017-09-19
2017-01-2135
Electrification of aircraft is on track to be a future key design principal due to the increasing pressure on the aviation industry to significantly reduce harmful emissions by 2050 and the increased use of electrical equipment. This has led to an increased focus on the research and development of alternative power sources for aircraft, including fuel cells. These alternative power sources could either be used to provide propulsive power or as an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). Previous studies have considered isolated design cases where a fuel cell system was tailored for their specific application. To accommodate for the large variation between aircraft, this study covers the design of an empirical model, which will be used to size a fuel cell system for any given aircraft based on basic design parameters. The model was constructed utilising aircraft categorisation, fuel cell sizing and balance of plant sub-models.
Journal Article

A Fully Coupled, 6 Degree-of-Freedom, Aerodynamic and Vehicle Handling Crosswind Simulation using the DrivAer Model

2016-04-05
2016-01-1601
In a real-world environment, a vehicle on the road is subjected to a range of flow yaw angles, the most severe of which can impact handling and stability. A fully coupled, six degrees-of-freedom CFD and vehicle handling simulation has modelled the complete closed loop system. Varying flow yaw angles are introduced via time dependent boundary conditions and aerodynamic loads predicted, whilst a handling model running simultaneously calculates the resulting vehicle response. Updates to the vehicle position and orientation within the CFD simulation are achieved using the overset grid method. Using this approach, a crosswind simulation that follows the parameters of ISO 12021:2010 (Sensitivity to lateral wind - Open-loop test method using wind generator input), was performed using the fastback variant of the DrivAer model. Fully coupled aerodynamic and vehicle response was compared to that obtained using the simplified quasi-steady and unsteady, one way coupled method.
Technical Paper

A Low Order Model of SCR-in-DPF Systems with Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

2018-04-03
2018-01-0953
This paper presents a method to achieve a low order system model of the urea-based SCR catalyst coated filter (SCR-in-DPF or SCRF or SDPF), while preserving a high degree of fidelity. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), also known as principal component analysis (PCA), or Karhunen-Loéve decomposition (KLD), is a statistical method which achieves model order reduction by extracting the dominant characteristic modes of the system and devises a low-dimensional approximation on that basis. The motivation for using the POD approach is that the low-order model directly derives from the high-fidelity model (or experimental data) thereby retains the physics of the system. POD, with Galerkin projection, is applied to the 1D + 1D SCR-in-DPF model using ammonia surface coverage and wall temperature as the dominant system states to achieve model order reduction.
Journal Article

A Modal-Based Derivation of Transient Pressure Distribution Along the Tyre-Road Contact

2009-04-20
2009-01-0457
The two-dimensional, frictional tyre-road contact interaction is investigated. A transient contact algorithm is developed, consisting of an analytical belt model, a non linear sidewall structure and a discretized viscoelastic tread foundation. The relationship between the magnitude/shape of the predicted two-dimensional pressure distribution and the corresponding belt deformation is identified. The effect of vertical load and the role of sidewall non linearity are highlighted. The modal expansion/reduction method is proposed for the increase of the computational efficiency and the effect of the degree of reduction on the simulation accuracy is presented. The qualitative results are physically explained through the participation of certain modes in the equilibrium solution, offering directions for the application of the modal reduction method in shear force oriented tyre models.
Technical Paper

A Parallel Hybrid Drive System for Small Vehicles: Architecture and Control Systems

2016-04-05
2016-01-1170
The TC48 project is developing a state-of-the-art, exceptionally low cost, 48V Plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) demonstration drivetrain suitable for electrically powered urban driving, hybrid operation, and internal combustion engine powered high speed motoring. This paper explains the motivation for the project, and presents the layout options considered and the rationale by which these were reduced. The vehicle simulation model used to evaluate the layout options is described and discussed. The modelling work was used in order to support and justify the design choices made. The design of the vehicle's control systems is discussed, presenting simulation results. The physical embodiment of the design is not reported in this paper. The paper describes analysis of small vehicles in the marketplace, including aspects of range and cost, leading to the justification for the specification of the TC48 system.
Journal Article

A Parametric Study of Automotive Rear End Geometries on Rear Soiling

2017-03-28
2017-01-1511
The motivation for this paper is to consider the effect of rear end geometry on rear soiling using a representative generic SUV body. In particular the effect of varying the top slant angle is considered using both experiment and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Previous work has shown that slant angle has a significant effect on wake shape and drag and the work here extends this to investigate the effect on rear soiling. It is hoped that this work can provide an insight into the likely effect of such geometry changes on the soiling of similarly shaped road vehicles. To increase the generality of results, and to allow comparison with previously obtained aerodynamic data, a 25% scale generic SUV model is used in the Loughborough University Large Wind Tunnel. UV doped water is sprayed from a position located at the bottom of the left rear tyre to simulate the creation of spray from this tyre.
Technical Paper

A Process Definition Environment for Component Based Manufacturing Machine Control Systems Developed Under the Foresight Vehicle Programme

2002-03-04
2002-01-0468
The COMponent Based Paradigm for AGile Automation (COMPAG) provides a component-based solution to engine production-line machine control systems. The traditional PLC system is replaced with a distributed control network containing intelligent nodes comprising locally controlled actuators and sensors. The Process Definition Environment provides support for the specification, configuration, and maintenance of the machine control application and facilitates both the initial design and maintenance stages of the lifecycle by describing the control logic as a set of consistent timing and state transition diagrams commonly used in the initial design stages.
Technical Paper

Aerodynamic Drag Reduction for a Simple Bluff Body Using Base Bleed

2003-03-03
2003-01-0995
Wind tunnel tests have been conducted on a simple bluff body model, representing a car like shape, to investigate drag reduction opportunities from injecting low velocity air into the base region. This flow is known as base bleed. Most tests have been carried out using a square back shape. The effects of flow rate, porosity and porosity distribution over the base area have been investigated. In all cases drag is reduced with increasing bleed rate, but the optimum porosity is a function of bleed rate. A significant part of the drag reduction occurs without the bleed flow and arises from the presence of a cavity in the model. The effects of cavity size are examined for different base configurations. Some factors affecting implementation are considered.
Journal Article

Aerodynamic Drag Reduction on a Simple Car-Like Shape with Rear Upper Body Taper

2013-04-08
2013-01-0462
Various techniques to reduce the aerodynamic drag of bluff bodies through the mechanism of base pressure recovery have been investigated. These include, for example, boat-tailing, base cavities and base bleed. In this study a simple body representing a car shape is modified to include tapering of the rear upper body on both roof and sides. The effects of taper angle and taper length on drag and lift characteristics are investigated. It is shown that a significant drag reduction can be obtained with moderate taper angles. An unexpected feature is a drag rise at a particular taper length. Pressure data obtained on the rear surfaces and some wake flow visualisation using PIV are presented.
Journal Article

Aerodynamic Drag of Passenger Cars at Yaw

2015-04-14
2015-01-1559
The aerodynamic drag characteristics of a passenger car are typically defined by a single parameter, the drag coefficient at zero yaw angle. While this has been acceptable in the past, it may not allow a true comparison between vehicles with regard to the impact of drag on performance, especially fuel economy. An alternative measure of aerodynamic drag should take into account the effect of non-zero yaw angles and some proposals have been made in the past, including variations of wind-averaged drag coefficient. For almost all cars the drag increases with yaw, but the increase can vary significantly between vehicles. In this paper the effect of various parameters on the drag rise with yaw are considered for a range of different vehicle types. The increase of drag with yaw is shown to be an essentially induced drag, which is strongly dependent on both side force and lift. Shape factors which influence the sensitivity of drag with yaw are discussed.
Technical Paper

Aerodynamic Drag of a Compact SUV as Measured On-Road and in the Wind Tunnel

2002-03-04
2002-01-0529
Growing concerns about the environmental impact of road vehicles will lead to a reduction in the aerodynamic drag for all passenger cars. This includes Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs) and light trucks which have relatively high drag coefficients and large frontal area. The wind tunnel remains the tool of choice for the vehicle aerodynamicist, but it is important that the benefits obtained in the wind tunnel reflect improvements to the vehicle on the road. Coastdown measurements obtained using a Land Rover Freelander, in various configurations, have been made to determine aerodynamic drag and these have been compared with wind tunnel data for the same vehicle. Repeatability of the coastdown data, the effects of drag variation near to zero yaw and asymmetry in the drag-yaw data on the results from coastdown testing are assessed. Alternative blockage corrections for the wind tunnel measurements are examined.
Technical Paper

Aerodynamic Side Forces on Passenger Cars at Yaw

2016-04-05
2016-01-1620
Side force has an influence on the behaviour of passenger cars in windy conditions. It increases approximately linearly with yaw angle over a significant range of yaw for almost all cars and the side force derivative, (the gradient of side force coefficient with yaw angle), is similar for vehicles of a given category and size. The shape factors and components which affect side force for different vehicle types are discussed. The dominant influence on side force, for most cars, however, is shown to be the vehicle height which is consistent with slender wing theory if the car and its mirror image are considered. This simple theory is shown to apply to 1-box and 2- box shapes, covering most MPVs, hatchbacks and SUVs, but does not adequately represent the side forces on notchback and fastback car shapes. Data from simple bodies is used to develop a modification to the basic theory, which is applied to these vehicle types.
Technical Paper

An Assessment of a Sensor Network Using Bayesian Analysis Demonstrated on an Inlet Manifold

2019-04-02
2019-01-0121
Modern control strategies for internal combustion engines use increasingly complex networks of sensors and actuators to measure different physical parameters. Often indirect measurements and estimation of variables, based off sensor data, are used in the closed loop control of the engine and its subsystems. Thus, sensor fusion techniques and virtual instrumentation have become more significant to the control strategy. With the large volumes of data produced by the increasing number of sensors, the analysis of sensor networks has become more important. Understanding the value of the information they contain and how well it is extracted through uncertainty quantification will also become essential to the development of control architecture. This paper proposes a methodology to quantify how valuable a sensor is relative to the architecture. By modelling the sensor network as a Bayesian network, Bayesian analysis and control metrics were used to assess the value of the sensor.
Journal Article

An Experimental Investigation into DEF Dosing Strategies for Heavy Duty Vehicle Applications

2015-04-14
2015-01-1028
In recent years urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has become the principal method of NOx abatement within heavy duty (HD) diesel exhaust systems; however, with upcoming applications demanding NOx reduction efficiencies of above 96 % on engines producing upwards of 10 g·kWh−1 NOx, future diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) dosing systems will be required to operate stably at significantly increased dosing rates. Developing a dosing system capable of meeting the increased performance requirements demands an improved understanding of how DEF sprays interact with changing exhaust flows. This study has investigated four production systems representing a diverse range of dosing strategies in order to determine how performance is influenced by spray structure and identify promising strategies for further development. The construction of an optically accessible hot-air flow rig has enabled visualisation of DEF injection into flows representative of HD diesel exhaust conditions.
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