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Technical Paper

A Framework for Model Based Detection of Misfire in a Gasoline Engine with Dynamic Skip Fire

2019-04-02
2019-01-1288
A framework is proposed for model-based misfire detection in gasoline engines with dynamic skip fire by employing a novel control oriented engine model. The model-based techniques form compact description of plant behavior and have a number of well known benefits. The performance requirements and environment legislation resulted in a rigorous research on misfire detection due to which an extensive literature can be found for the problem of misfire detection in all-cylinder firing gasoline engines. Since there is no fix cylinder activation/de-activation sequence in dynamic skip fire engines. So, the problem of misfire detection in dynamic skip fire engines departs from its trivial nature. In the proposed framework, ‘cylinder skip sequence’ is also fed to the engine model along-with conventional engine inputs. The First Principle based Engine Model constructs the crankshaft angular speed fluctuation pattern for a given cylinder skip sequence.
Journal Article

A Method of Frequency Content Based Analysis of Driving Braking Behavior

2015-04-14
2015-01-1564
Typically, when one thinks of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), systems such as Forward Collision Warning (FCW) and Collision Imminent Braking (CIB) come to mind. In these systems driver assistance is provided based on knowledge about the subject vehicle and surrounding objects. A new class of these systems is being implemented. These systems not only use information on the surrounding objects but also use information on the driver's response to an event, to determine if intervention is necessary. As a result of this trend, an advanced level of understanding of driver braking behavior is necessary. This paper presents an alternate method of analyzing driver braking behavior. This method uses a frequency content based approach to study driver braking and allows for the extraction of significantly more data from driver profiles than traditionally would have been done.
Journal Article

A Numerical Study of Trailing Edge Serrations on Sunroof Buffeting Noise Reduction

2017-03-28
2017-01-0441
A numerical study on sunroof noise reduction is carried out. One of the strategies to suppress the noise is to break down the strong vortices impinging upon the trailing edge of the sunroof into smaller eddies. In the current study, a serrated sunroof trailing edge with sinusoidal profiles of wavelengths is investigated for the buffeting noise reduction. A number of combinations of wavelengths and amplitudes of sinusoidal profiles is employed to examine the effects of trailing edge serrations on the noise reduction. A generic vehicle model is used in the study and a straight trailing edge is considered as a baseline. The results indicate that the trailing edge serration has a significant impact on the sound pressure level (SPL) in the vehicle cabin and it can reduce the SPL by up to 10~15 dB for the buffeting frequency.
Technical Paper

A Physically-Based, Lumped-Parameter Model of an Electrically-Heated Three-Way Catalytic Converter

2012-04-16
2012-01-1240
The impact of cold-start emissions is well known on conventional and hybrid electric vehicles. Plug-in electric vehicles offer a unique challenge in that there are opportunities for prolonged engine-off conditions which can lead to catalyst cooling and elevated emissions on engine re-start. This research investigates the development and validation of a system for controlling emissions under these conditions, with an emphasis on a catalytic converter model used for design and analysis. The model is a one-dimensional, lumped-parameter model of a three-way catalytic converter developed in Matlab/Simulink. The catalyst is divided into discrete, axial elements and each discrete element contains states for the temperatures of the gas, substrate, and can wall. Heat transfer mechanisms are modeled from physics-based equations.
Technical Paper

A Physics-Based, Control-Oriented Turbocharger Compressor Model for the Prediction of Pressure Ratio at the Limit of Stable Operations

2019-04-02
2019-01-0320
Downsizing and boosting is currently the principal solution to reduce fuel consumption in automotive engines without penalizing the power output. A key challenge for controlling the boost pressure during highly transient operations lies in avoiding to operate the turbocharger compressor in its instability region, also known as surge. While this phenomenon is well known by control engineers, it is still difficult to accurately predict during transient operations. For this reason, the scientific community has directed considerable efforts to understand the phenomena leading to the onset of unstable behavior, principally through experimental investigations or high-fidelity CFD simulations. On the other hand, less emphasis has been placed on creating control-oriented models that adopt a physics-based (rather than data-driven) approach to predict the onset of instability phenomena.
Technical Paper

A Rule-Based Control for Fuel-Efficient Automotive Air Conditioning Systems

2015-04-14
2015-01-0366
In a conventional passenger vehicle, the AC system is the largest ancillary load. This paper proposes a novel control strategy to reduce the energy consumption of the air conditioning system of a conventional passenger car. The problem of reducing the parasitic load of the AC system is first approached as a multi-objective optimization problem. Starting from a validated control-oriented model of an automotive AC system, an optimization problem is formalized to achieve the best possible fuel economy over a regulatory driving cycle, while guaranteeing the passenger comfort in terms of cabin temperature and reduce the wear of the components. To complete the formulation of the problem, a set of constraints on the pressure in the heat exchanger are defined to guarantee the safe operation of the system. The Dynamic Programming (DP), a numerical optimization technique, is then used to obtain the optimal solution in form of a control sequence over a prescribed driving cycle.
Journal Article

A Scalable Modeling Approach for the Simulation and Design Optimization of Automotive Turbochargers

2015-04-14
2015-01-1288
Engine downsizing and super/turbocharging is currently the most followed trend in order to reduce CO2 emissions and increase the powertrain efficiency. A key challenge for achieving the desired fuel economy benefits lies in optimizing the design and control of the engine boosting system, which requires the ability to rapidly sort different design options and technologies in simulation, evaluating their impact on engine performance and fuel consumption. This paper presents a scalable modeling approach for the characterization of flow and efficiency maps for automotive turbochargers. Starting from the dimensional analysis theory for turbomachinery and a set of well-known control-oriented models for turbocharged engines simulation, a novel scalable model is proposed to predict the flow and efficiency maps of centrifugal compressors and radial inflow turbines as function of their key design parameters.
Technical Paper

A Unified, Scalable and Replicable Approach to Development, Implementation and HIL Evaluation of Autonomous Shuttles for Use in a Smart City

2019-04-02
2019-01-0493
As the technology in autonomous vehicle and smart city infrastructure is developing fast, the idea of smart city and automated driving has become a present and near future reality. Both Highway Chauffeur and low speed shuttle applications are tested recently in different research to test the feasibility of autonomous vehicles and automated driving. Based on examples available in the literature and the past experience of the authors, this paper proposes the use of a unified computing, sensing, communication and actuation architecture for connected and automated driving. It is postulated that this unified architecture will also lead to a scalable and replicable approach. Two vehicles representing a passenger car and a small electric shuttle for smart mobility in a smart city are chosen as the two examples for demonstrating scalability and replicability.
Technical Paper

Accuracy Assessment of Three-Dimensional Site Features Generated with Aid of Photogrammetric Epipolar Lines in PhotoModeler and Using Minimal sUAS Imagery

2019-04-02
2019-01-0410
Photogrammetry is widely used in the accident reconstruction community to extract three-dimensional information from photographs. This article extends a prior study conducted by the authors, whereby model accuracy was assessed for a technique that exploited vehicle edges and epipolar line projections to construct 3D vehicle models, by examining 3D roadway and site features. To do so, artificial images were generated using an ideal computer-generated camera within a computer-assisted drawing environment to allow for a known reference model to compare with results produced using photogrammetry. A systematic study was undertaken by modeling the curvature, elevation, and super-elevation of a roadway and associated markings, sidewalks, and buildings, either by relying on discrete points or utilizing epipolar lines. The models were assessed for accuracy, and the sensitivity of the accuracy to camera elevation was considered.
Technical Paper

Accuracy Assessment of Three-Dimensional Vehicle Edge Features Generated with Aid of Photogrammetric Epipolar Lines

2018-04-03
2018-01-0530
Photogrammetry is widely used in the automotive and accident reconstruction communities to extract three-dimensional information from photographs. Prior studies in the literature have demonstrated the accuracy of such methods when photographs contain easily-identifiable, distinct points; however, it is often desirable to determine measurements for locations where a seam, edge, or contour line is available. To exploit such details, an analyst can control the direction that the epipolar line is projected onto the camera plane by strategic selection of photographs. This process constrains the search for the corresponding 3D point to a straight line that can be projected perpendicular to the seam, edge, or contour line. Thus, the goal of this study was to evaluate the modeling accuracy for cases in which an analyst uses epipolar lines in a workflow.
Technical Paper

Acoustic Characteristics of Automotive Catalytic Converter Assemblies

2004-03-08
2004-01-1002
An experimental study of the acoustic characteristics of automotive catalytic converters is presented. The investigation addresses the effects and relative importance of the elements comprising a production catalytic converter assembly including the housing, substrate, mat and seals. Attenuation characteristics are measured for one circular and one oval catalytic converter geometry, each having 400 cell per square inch substrates. For each geometry, experimental results are presented to address the effect of individual components in isolation, and in combination with other assembly components. Additional experiments investigate the significance of acoustic paths around the substrate and through the peripheral wall of the substrate. The experimental results are compared to address the significance of each component on the overall attenuation.
Technical Paper

Adaptation of TruckSim Models to Simulate Experimental Heavy Truck Hard Braking Test Data Under Various Levels of Brake Disablement

2010-10-05
2010-01-1920
This research focuses on the development and performance of analytical models to simulate a tractor-semitrailer in straight-ahead braking. The simulations were modified and tuned to simulate full-treadle braking with all brakes functioning correctly, as well as the behavior of the tractor-semitrailer rig under full braking with selected brakes disabled. The models were constructed in TruckSim and based on a tractor-semitrailer used in dry braking performance testing. The full-scale vehicle braking research was designed to define limits for engineering estimates on stopping distance when Class 8 air-braked vehicles experience partial degradation of the foundation brake system. In the full scale testing, stops were conducted from 30 mph and 60 mph, with the combination loaded to 80,000 lbs (gross combined weight or GCW), half payload, and with the tractor-semitrailer unladen (lightly loaded vehicle weight, or LLVW).
Technical Paper

Analysis and Mathematical Modeling of Car-Following Behavior of Automated Vehicles for Safety Evaluation

2019-04-02
2019-01-0142
With the emergence of Driving Automation Systems (SAE levels 1-5), the necessity arises for methods of evaluating these systems. However, these systems are much more challenging to evaluate than traditional safety features (SAE level 0). This is because an understanding of the Driving Automation system’s response in all possible scenarios is desired, but prohibitive to comprehensively test. Hence, this paper attempts to evaluate one such system, by modeling its behavior. The model generated parameters not only allow for objective comparison between vehicles, but also provide a more complete understanding of the system. The model can also be used to extrapolate results by simulating other scenarios without the need for conducting more tests. In this paper, low speed automated driving (also known as Traffic Jam Assist (TJA)) is studied. This study focused on the longitudinal behavior of automated vehicles while following a lead vehicle (LV) in traffic jam scenarios.
Journal Article

Analysis of Motor Vibration Isolation System with Focus on Mount Resonances for Application to Electric Vehicles

2015-06-15
2015-01-2364
The vibration isolation effectiveness of powertrain mount configurations is examined for electric vehicle application by considering the effect introduced by internal mount resonances. Unlike internal combustion engines where mounts are typically designed only for static support and low frequency dynamics, electric motors have higher excitation frequencies in a range where mount resonances often occur. The problem is first analytically formulated by considering a simple 3-dimensional powertrain system, and the vibration isolation effectiveness significantly deteriorates at the mount resonance(s). It is shown that by modifying the mount shape, the mount resonance(s) can be shifted while maintaining the same static rate, tuning the frequency away from any engine excitation or natural frequencies. Further, internal mount resonances are utilized to improve vibration isolation over a narrow frequency range, using non-identical mounts to split mount resonance peaks.
Technical Paper

Application of Adversarial Networks for 3D Structural Topology Optimization

2019-04-02
2019-01-0829
Topology optimization is a branch of structural optimization which solves an optimal material distribution problem. The resulting structural topology, for a given set of boundary conditions and constraints, has an optimal performance (e.g. minimum compliance). Conventional 3D topology optimization algorithms achieve quality optimized results; however, it is an extremely computationally intensive task which is, in general, impractical and computationally unachievable for real-world structural optimal design processes. Therefore, the current development of rapid topology optimization technology is experiencing a major drawback. To address the issues, a new approach is presented to utilize the powerful abilities of large deep learning models to replicate this design process for 3D structures. Adversarial models, primarily Wasserstein Generative Adversarial Networks (WGAN), are constructed which consist of 2 deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) namely, a discriminator and a generator.
Technical Paper

Application of Collision Probability Estimation to Calibration of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems

2019-04-02
2019-01-1133
Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) are designed and calibrated rigorously to provide them with the robustness against highly uncertain environments that they usually operate in. Typical calibration procedures for such systems rely extensively on track (controlled environment) testing, which is time-consuming, expensive, and sometimes cannot cover all the critical test scenarios that could be encountered by ADAS in the real world. Therefore, virtual (simulation-based) testing and validation has been gaining more prominence and emphasis for ensuring high coverage along with easier scalability and usage. This paper attempts to provide an alternative approach for calibrating ADAS in the controller validation phase by the aid of simulated test case scenarios. The study executes characterization of the uncertainty in the position and heading of the ego and the obstacle vehicles.
Technical Paper

Application of Scaled Deflection Injury Criteria to Two Small, Fragile Females in Side Impact Motor Vehicle Crashes

2018-04-03
2018-01-0542
Thoracic injury criteria have been previously developed to predict thoracic injury for vehicle occupants as a function of biomechanical response. Historically, biomechanical testing of post-mortem human surrogates (PMHS) for injury criteria development has primarily been focused on mid-sized males. Response targets and injury criteria for other demographics, including small females, have been determined by scaling values from mid-sized males. The objective of this study was to explore the applicability of scaled injury criteria to their representative population. Two PMHS were subjected to a side-impact loading condition which replicates a near-side, MDB-to-vehicle impact for the driver. This was accomplished using the Advanced Side Impact System, or ASIS, on a HYGE sled. The sled acceleration matched the acceleration profile of an impacted vehicle, while the four pneumatic cylinders of the ASIS produced realistic door intrusion.
Technical Paper

Biologically Inspired, Intelligent Muscle Material for Sensing and Responsive Delivery of Countermeasures

2000-07-10
2000-01-2514
The design and development of new biologically inspired technologies based on intelligent materials that are capable of sensing the levels of target biomolecules and, if needed, trigger appropriate countermeasures to regulate biological processes and rhythms of the astronauts is being undertaken in our laboratories. This is accomplished by coupling biologically inspired sensors that monitor the levels of the target biomolecules with intelligent polymeric materials that can regulate the release of a countermeasure. The technology developed here integrates sensors and artificial muscle material into a self-regulating device that can perform with minimal crew intervention. Further, it takes advantage of microfabrication technology to construct lightweight and robust responsive delivery systems. These “intelligent” devices address the need for the control and regulation of biological processes and rhythms under spaceflight conditions.
Journal Article

Comparative Assessment of Frequency Dependent Joint Properties Using Direct and Inverse Identification Methods

2015-06-15
2015-01-2229
Elastomeric joints are utilized in many automotive applications, and exhibit frequency and excitation amplitude dependent properties. Current methods commonly identify only the cross-point joint property using displacement excitation at stepped single frequencies. This process is often time consuming and is limited to measuring a single dynamic stiffness term of the joint stiffness matrix. This study focuses on developing tractable laboratory inverse experiments to identify frequency dependent stiffness matrices up to 1000 Hz. Direct measurements are performed on a commercial elastomer test system and an inverse experiment consisting of an elastic beam (with a square cross section) attached to a cylindrical elastomeric joint. Sources of error in the inverse methodology are thoroughly examined and explained through simulation which include ill-conditioning of matrices and the sensitivity to modeling error.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Intermediate-Combustion Products Formed in Engine with and without Ignition

1955-01-01
550262
RESULTS of tests performed on a modified type F-4 CFR engine show that precombustion reactions in both the fired and motored engine gave the same carbonyl products. The maximum specific yields of these carbonyls were similar for a given fuel compressed with comparable pressure-time-temperature histories in both motored- and fired-engine tests. As the motored engine seems to duplicate precombustion reactions occurring in a fired engine under normal operating conditions, the authors of this paper conclude that the motored engine, offering ease of control and sampling, is a convenient and valid tool for combustion research.
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